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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok here is the situation, right now I'm Carrying a Goldmatch in a IWB open style holster. I'm not really comfortable carrying it in a C&L position. I would like to get a IWB style holster with a reinforced thumb break. Please tell me the advantage, and disadvantage of holsters with a reinforced thumb break for ccw.
Thanks
 

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I had a Bianchi thumb break left hand using ambi safties and the saftie would swipe off every time I snaped the holster.

Went to an open top holster C&L with no problems for 6 months

Cocked and locked is the only way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I carry C&L for about 3 months now, without any problems at all. But sometime I still get that funny feeling. Maybe I should give it time for those funny feeling to go away. Thanks
 

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<><> VC, I have a Milt Sparks Summer Special II, that has a [sweat guard, body shield, whatever,] that has never had the safety switched off. Besides protecting the body, it also protects the safety from accidentlly switching off.
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Originally posted by VC:
Ok here is the situation, right now I'm Carrying a Goldmatch in a IWB open style holster. I'm not really comfortable carrying it in a C&L position. I would like to get a IWB style holster with a reinforced thumb break. Please tell me the advantage, and disadvantage of holsters with a reinforced thumb break for ccw.
Thanks
I carried a cocked and locked AMT Hardballer about 20 years ago in a Bianchi Model 19. The strap was tight enough that I had to soak it, put the gun in a baggy, snap the strap in place, and let it dry before use. It was safe, quick, and reliable. I traded that gun and holster for a K-Frame .357 and carried that until a few years ago, when I started carrying another 1911 concealed in an open-top holster.

I liked the strap, because it was stretched tightly across the rear of the frame, preventing the hammer or anything else from striking the firing pin. Also, I was a good bit more active then than now, and the positive restraint was a good thing.
 
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