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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
N/G = natural gas


I have already made up my mind that it would not make sense for me to leave my house. I have tens of thousands of rounds of ammo plus powder primers and bullets to make more, plus I have a good supply of food and other necessities. I have arthritis and joint problems that get worst in the cold weather so leaving a warm house to wind up in some cold tent or hole in the ground or cave will just put me in a lot of pain. I am sure there are others like me that are too old to be leaving a warm house to hide out in a tent.


Now to get to the point of this question what would be a good generator in a SHTF situation.

I am fortunate because this house is heated by natural gas and I have a gas fireplace so I have heat regardless of if I have electricity. So it seems as if a generator that runs on N/G would be a good choice because there would be an unlimited supply of fuel, and there would be no need to store a fuel supply nor worry about carrying and pouring fuel and making sure the generator tank does not run dry and replenishing my supply of fuel if it runs out. If power is out the gas stations pumps won't work unless they have a generator and if they do have a a jenny they will be charging 420 a gallon which is a good reason not to bug out in your car unless you can get there on one tank allowing for the fact that you will be burning a lot of gas standing still stuck in traffic . One of the reasons I ask this question is because i don't know how N/G is delivered. Does it require pumps the keep up the pressure and if something happens and the pumps are down will the pressure drop to the point where there isn't enough pressure to make the gas flow through th system.

Or does the gas flow through the system because it comes out of the ground under pressure. That was just a long way of asking if the gas will continue to flow in the event of some kind of situation where the workers are not able to maintence. I have eliminated gasoline so the choice would be N/G or Diesel.

If you had a supply of N/G would you install a N/G generator? If not why.

If things become so bad that people are considering leaving their houses will there still be a supply of N/G?

I moved here at the end of Aug of 2007 and I want to start doing some research about the best type generator to buy.
 

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Welcome to the preparedness mindset. Sounds like you are just getting started and as you read up you will see how ill prepared the vast majority of folks are.

As for N/G supply you are close. N/G if you are close to a well head you maybe fine, but they do pressurize the supply lines. I haven't studied that particular question in depth because there is no N/G in my area.

Gen Sets are covered at length on www.survivalblog.com use the search function or about mid way down the page there are links to subjects as well as a huge amount of info in the archives.

If you do use a Tri-Fuel (Gas/NG/Propane) there are some great advantages. The fuel does not go bad, foul sparkplugs from siting for months etc.

You will want to protect yourself and your gen as they are hot commodities in a grid down situation like after a hurricane. People have been known to steal them while the owner sleeps. The noise/ lights are a dead giveaway in an otherwise dark quite area. Weld/lock/secure it somehow, black out blinds maybe worth considering as well as muffling the noise.

My personal favorite gen is a "Lister" type or low RPM diesel. They are ultra efficient and will run on just about any oil based fuel from kerosene on down. The down side is they are heavy and expensive.
 

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Natural gas normaly moves through pipelines under pressure from a well to a processing facility to an interstate distrubution network to a utility service storage facility to distribution system. Depending on the specific network and location, there may be some variation. There are typicaly pumping stations every 50-100 miles to keep the pressure up. These require power of some sort to operate.
The system will fail eventualy without maintance and operators. For short-term emergancies (hurricaines, blizzards, etc) its probably much more reliable than electricity. However, if there is a concern that the system may be damaged, someone will likely shut it down.
Just because your furnace runs on gas doesn't mean you'll have good heat. Electric fans move the warm air though the house. Traditional fireplaces, regardless of fuel type, are a poor heating source. Fireplace inserts work much better, but also require fans to circulate heat.
I use primaraly wood heat, and propane as a backup (as well as hot water, clothes dryer, and cooking). I normaly only need to fill a 500 gallon tank once a year. 2 5k generators (1 gas and 1 diesel) provide electricity when needed.
I've currently got 4 years worth of wood, and normaly have 30-50 gallons each of gas and diesel. I'm comfortable that I can easily outlast a natural disaster (hurricaines in my part of NC), assuming it doesn't destroy the place.
 

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We have a 15,000w unit that will run the whole house plus one 240v item (electric stove, electric dryer, or A/C). Ours is powered by a 25HP Kohler gas engine. If I had it to do over I would go with an LPG unit and have a small LPG tank set beside the house. We have natural gas, but I would rather be totally independant of their delivery system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My personal favorite gen is a "Lister" type or low RPM diesel. They are ultra efficient and will run on just about any oil based fuel from kerosene on down. The down side is they are heavy and expensive.
Heavy can be a good thing it would make them harder to carry off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Just because your furnace runs on gas doesn't mean you'll have good heat. Electric fans move the warm air though the house. Traditional fireplaces, regardless of fuel type, are a poor heating source. Fireplace inserts work much better, but also require fans to circulate heat.
When I was buying my house most of the places I looked at all had gas fireplaces. I the time I was disappointed because I would rather have had wood. After owning the place I am glad I have gas because all i need to do is flick a switch to get it to fire up. It works well with no power, if I crank it up to the high setting the room will quickly jump to over 90 degrees but the bedrooms will be cold.
the first year I lived here I blew the furnace transformer when I installed a digital thermostat and I had to sleep on the pull up sofa bed till I got it fixed but at least I know I will be warm with just the fireplace to heat the house. I can still stay warn if the N/G supply ended because I have LPG heaters (LPG= Liquefied petroleum gas) that would keep me comfortable.


The reason I would like to go N/G or LPG is that storing 100 gallons of gasoline could be hazardous and gasoline goes bad if stored for a long time, it can akso gum up the injectors or carburetor.
 

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Thanks to Global Warming and Obama's failed schemes we haven't had a hurricane in South Carolina for twenty years. Back then, my electricity was off for over three weeks. There was no city water, fuel, or food. The National Guard was called in when the democrats started looting. People were fighting over ice and generators (both high theft items). Those of us with solar panels, private wells, and a little food did okay. Not a shot had to be fired and none of my friends were turned away (showers, water, meals, etc).
To be independent from the kindness of strangers, you should go Green (solar, wind, geothermal). Or do as many do, wait for Uncle Sam to rescue you.
 

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Even if you buy a generator that runs on gasoline you can buy conversion kits to switch over to LPG or NG. I plan on converting mine to LP if for no other reason than longer time between fill-ups.
 
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