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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi. I know case lubes have been covered in the past but I have a question. I have been searching and most of you would appear to be using Hornady One Shot. I bought two cans of this yesterday and started loading new Winchester brass on my new XL 650. I cranked out 430rds with no problems. Still 70rds short I decided to load the rest dry. Big mistake. The effort was three times of what the lubed cases need. My question is how does the Dillon case lube work. I have a bottle that came with my machine but the instuctions do not indicate how long to let it dry before loading. The Hornady worked great and this is the product I will continue to buy in the future but I hate to waste a whole bottle of the Dillon stuff. Thanks, Dom
 

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Yes, it does work. I've used Hornady One Shot and don't notice any major differences. I usually let them sit for a couple of minutes before loading.
 

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With Dillon Case Lube, dump the brass into a shallow cardboard box or onto a cooking tray, with the brass all laying down. Spray a light coat of lube on the cases, shake the box to roll the cases around, and spray on another light coat. Wait at least five minutes for the alcohol carrier to evaporate, then start loading.
 

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Dom,

What caliber are you loading, rifle?

I've used both for .223 Rem and .308. I prefer the Hornady One-Shot lube. You can get a nice thin coating that dries faster from the aerosol spray.

The Dillon lube is basically alcohol and lanolin, so it is thicker and stickier delivered from a pump spray.

In either case, pun intended, I use a shoe box cover to lay my cases flat to spray and shake around before loading. After loading, I run it through my tumbler to get a polish.
 

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I have used the Dillon Lube for many years on Rifle cartridges---But never on pistol cases. I would then tumble clean the Rifle cases after sizing the cases using the Dillon lube. No problems doing it that way. After reading this site a year ago and picking up the tips about using Hornady 1-shot Dry lube on pistol cases and Dillon Press's----I tried it and loved it. The Hornady lube turns VERY dry after the carrier evaporates and the lube does not effect the powder or primer---So the label says. However my experience with the DILLON lube is that it stays very sticky and tacky after the carrier dries. Myself---I would not use it like the Hornady stuff on pistol cases.....to sticky. Just my experience is all.....Your experience may vary..... Save the bottle....You might find a use for it next year:p
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the tips. I think I'll stick with the One Shot for loading .45acp. Dom
 

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with a 650 I dump the brass into the case feeder and spray the hornady lube in the feeder and then turn it on...has worked fawlessly for me for over 100,000 rounds, pistol, rifle...

sno
 

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Okay, I'm confused.

I do all my loading on a single-stage press, so I'm not entirely up to speed on the vagaries of loading on a progressive press like a Dillon, but is case lube really necessary with straight-walled pistol cases like .45 ACP? I would've thought that would be unnecessary with carbide dies--unless you need the extra lubrication when performing four or five operations with one pull of the lever....
 

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it's not needed but it sure makes it alot nicer....

sno
 

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A Lil' Lube Helps Us All..

I've been lightly spraying .45 ACP cases ever since I bought my RL550 in '97. Once tumbled, I use a large plastic pan to hold the cases ready to load. A short spray, stir/mix the cases up with my hand, then another short spray. You don't need to coat each case. A little goes a long way to reduce friction..
 

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I've read, I think on the Enos forum, that when you use the Hornady One Shot, you don't have to tumble the rounds afterwards (well, I guess you don't HAVE to tumble rounds loaded with the Dillon case lube, but they're awfully spoogy).

Do people here agree?
 

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When loading straight walled pistol cases, the last thing I want to fool with is lube. That's why I buy carbide dies.

The pull on the 550B isn't enough of a problem for me to be looking at ways of reducing it. I also don't much care for the idea of having lubricated rounds going into the chamber of my gun.
 

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When loading straight walled pistol cases, the last thing I want to fool with is lube. That's why I buy carbide dies.

Lubricated is relative. It is not as if the One Shot leaves them oily.

No, it is not required.

However, the Dillon 550B is one heck of a lot:

easier/faster/smoother/more pleasant/less prone to primer feed problems

...when run with cases lightly lubed with Hornady One Shot than without.
 

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Archer said:
However, the Dillon 550B is one heck of a lot:

easier/faster/smoother/more pleasant/less prone to primer feed problems when run with cases lightly lubed with Hornady One Shot than without.
Ok, I might try it then. If I can just spray on a little lube and then forget about it (i.e. not have to remove it) it won't be a big hassle.
 

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Archer said:
Lubricated is relative. It is not as if the One Shot leaves them oily.

No, it is not required.

However, the Dillon 550B is one heck of a lot:

easier/faster/smoother/more pleasant/less prone to primer feed problems

...when run with cases lightly lubed with Hornady One Shot than without.


It also keeps COL much more consistant IMO because less force is put on the shellplate.

Dog
 

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This makes absolutely perfect sense, but I've got to say that I just loaded about 1500 rounds of 9mm without lubrication, and the COL's are all within 0.002" (total range) of one another.

But I'm all for a lube which does not have to be tumbled off after. And even though the 9mm loading is easy dry, I know it's just that much easier lubed. I'm gonna try the Hornady stuff.
 
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