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I got yelled at by the missus when I went to bed last night regarding the solvent smell on my hands. I washed them **SEVERAL** times, but the smell was still there. Then, she started in on me about solvent in my system, cancer.....you know the drill.

How bad is solvent anyway?
 

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Breakfree CLP.

Best. Solvent. Ever.
 

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How bad are solvents for you anyway? That all depends. What specific solvents are you talking about?

Brake cleaner, for example, is a strong concinogen that you don't want to breath or get in contact with your skin.

Many, like brake cleaner, are transdermal and will pass from your skin and into your body and circulate via the bloodstream.

If you have solvent on your hands and you can smell it after several washings, then you know that the fluid has permeated your skin to the point that soak is not removing it. That can happen with a lot of fluids, not just solvents, but you get the idea that the solvent isn't just simply on your skin.

Instead of asking up here how bad solvents are, why not take the various products in question and read the warning labels? Find the contents or chemical names and do a search for them on the internet.

How bad are solvents anyway? Well, one way to look at the issue would be to look at how they can be disposed of properly. I think you will find that most solvents and many petrol products fall under the guise of toxic waste.
 

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Exposure to gun cleaning products can have some significant side effects. Exposure can stimulate the portion of the brain that causes one to be skeptical of blathering news anchors, newspaper writers, and liberal politicians. In extreme cases, the person so exposed starts losing interest in the safe, socially-mandated practice of sitting passively in front of the televisor and, instead, goes to range, loads ammo, or dry-practices. Some even go so far as to curl up with a good book!

Exposure can also manifest itself in a preference for red meat and potatoes and a distaste for tofu, yogurt, bean sprouts, and other such rabbit food.

Many of the exposed lose patience with the mindless prattle of the sheep-like masses and start socializing primarily with other persons who suffer from gun-cleaning product exposure.

Dangerous indeed!

Rosco
 

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fremont said:
I got yelled at by the missus when I went to bed last night regarding the solvent smell on my hands. I washed them **SEVERAL** times, but the smell was still there. Then, she started in on me about solvent in my system, cancer.....you know the drill.

How bad is solvent anyway?
It will probably add years to your life if you use enough because it will make your wife leave you and then you can focus on the things that really make a man happy (shooting guns).

If you want a stinkless cleaner that will silence the sposal unit, MPRO7 is very good and odor free.
 

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A sample of one person is not a reason to believe that solvents or smoking is ok.

For everybody who smokes and eats red meat into their 90's, I can give you three who died of a stroke or lung cancer in their 30's and 40's.

Living is dangerous enough, try to limit your exposure to any of the gun scrubber type products, these indeed to cause cancer. I do often wear surgical gloves when cleaning my guns. I also wear a $30 3M respirator when shooting at indoor ranges.
 

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Real Hawkeye said:
Strong solvents, when the fumes are breathed in, will disolve your lung tissues.
NOPE. I painted cars for years and breathed enough lacquer thinner fumes to stone out everybody at Woodstock. The fumes can be an irritant and it bothers some people more than others, but they don't "dissolve" any part of your body. Brain damage is a possibility if you sniff them for recreation.
 

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The warnings on those solvent containers are there for a reason.

However, a few simple precautions can reduce the danger substantially. Use disposable gloves and a respirator rated for organic solvents. Make sure that you use the solvents only in areas with very good ventilation. And, be careful about disposal of solvent soaked patches and rags.

Many solvents will penetrate the disposable gloves to some extent, so it's a good idea to wash your hands thoroughly after using them.
 

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Yes, it is true that there may be other things that are more dangerous to you than the occasional contact with and breathing in of solvents, such as auto accidents. Just because there are things that are more dangerous does not mean that one should not worry about the effects. DHMeieio, I understand your point, but the reality is that few people will ever redouble their efforts in car safety as opposed to spending the same effort on safely handling chemicals such as solvents. So a lot of folks will still be lax in the handling of chemicals and go about their business thinking to themselves that they are at more risk of injury in an autowreck and therefore blow off the risk posed by chemicals.

Where things get particularly troublesome is when a given individual has some sort of inability to deal with the solvents in their system. This may be due to a genetic predisposition, combined effects of multiple chemical insults (not just one type of solvent, but several), or even drug interactions where a medication you are taking somehow affects the body's ability to deal with the solvent insult.

Sort of like with lead poisoning or mechanical hearing loss, the process can be slow and the effects happen over a long period of time before getting to be really detrimental. Often, such effects occur so slowly that folks are apt not to associate the cause with the effect and hence don't do anything to correct it. Because they don't correct it and don't understand it, it just gets worse.

These days, with all the stuff known to help germinate cancer in the human body, do we really want to voluntarily introduce that many more like solvents?
 

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Toxicology axiom No. 1: there are no toxic compounds, only toxic levels. If you shoot every night at an indoor range, then go at the gun with break cleaner when you get home, I'd guess your exposure might be of some significance. Once a week? Every two weeks? I'm not worried...
 

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To heck with me

I'm worried more about my gun, no solvents touch my toys. Maybe my Marine Corp training stuck a little to well, but CLP and a nylon brush is all I clean with- solvents is for weenies and squids . :D
 
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