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Hola.

Just came back from the range (and it was another GREAT time!), and wondered if I should clean the two Colt factory mags I use. If yes, then how?

So far, I just wiped them down with oil, including the follower and inside of the feed lips (from which I got some powder).

Should I do anything more, and if so, what?

T.i.a...

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when we could run away to paradise.

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and I can't get away.

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You really don't want to use oil in there John.
I know most ammo now a days is sealed pretty good but why risk the oil getting into your primers?
Run something (small punch works good) through one of the witness holes about half way down so you can hold the spring compressed away from the follower. Then tip the magazine upside down so the follower falls forward and snitch it out from there. Remember that spring is under compression when you remove the punch to take the spring out.
 

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Also see JimV's helpful FAQ entry here: http://www.1911forum.com/ubb/Forum11/HTML/000006.html

Like Gravity said,,, oil in the mag tube isn't too great an idea. Some folks use powdered graphite available at auto parts stores for lubing locks. If you do try graphite, my experience has been that "a little goes a long, long, long way".


I have a patch with powdered graphite on it that I keep in its own baggy, I swirl the patch around a little inside the tube when I'm done brushing it out. I haven't re-"applied" any graphite since the first "coating" and the patch is only getting more useful with age.

I don't do this treatment to my Wilson or Baer magazines because the plastic (polymer?) follower doesn't seem to need it. Does anyone out there use graphite on a Wilson type mag?

Good luck, Doc... and make sure to note how the mag spring comes out so ya know which way to put it back in.

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If they have springs, they need some sort of lube after cleaning. The more "finished" they appear or polished, if you like that better, the smoother they'll be. You might want to just clean them very well and add just the graphite or other dry lube to the "spring" before you re-install it. That's about it...Doesn't hurt to check 'em every range trip, jsut remember if you clean them to re-apply dry lube before you reassemble...Change the springs to some Wolff springs or use Wilsonb replacement kits to upgrade for not much more money and you'll have very reliable mags that'll last quite awhile...

Good luck...

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Discussion Starter #5
Could one of you fine gentlemen please explain the "dry lube" concept? I'm new to this field and have no understanding of what this is or how to do it at all.

Sad but true, I'm a gun idiot.


Thanking you in advance (and for the above help)...
 

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Dry lube would be something like powdered graphite. Dry lubes will not attract dust like some of the wet lubes will.

I have a brush that is bent in a "U" shape that just fits inside a 1911 magazine. I remove the spring and follower, squirt down the inside with a spray cleaner, run the brush in and out a couple of times and then repeat the brush bit with a couple of frops of CLP to prevent rust. I wipe down the spring with a patch that has a little CLP on it and reassemble the magazines. no problems yet. You don't want to slop the oil/lube in the magazines, like the old commercian said, "A little dab'll do ya."

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wut werks 4 me

i just take it apart, hose it down with wd40, scrub with a brush and wipe clean with a rag, reassemble.
stick the toothbrush up into the mag and scrub and try to work a rag or towel into the mag to clean it out by forcing it in with the toothbrush.
(hardbristle GI brush)

or maybe use some gunscrubber and leave it at that

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Caspian frame + Colt parts = Col-spian? or Cas-olt?
 

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How do you guys take apart "Shooting Star" mags from CMC? The base plate is welded on these mags and the follower will not angle past the feed lips.

Anyone have experience with these mags?

MadDog.
 

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I just pull the follower forward and out of my SS mags. To reassemble, I "catch" the top coil on the little seat on the follower, and push the spring and follower back in; don't even need the pin/drift, or other tools. When I'm on the range, I use a mag brush any time the mags have been on the ground - don't disassemble, just hold the mag upside-down and work the brush up and down a half-dozen times - the brush will get the little junk, and anything bigger will fall out the mouth or witness holes. When I get home, I brush them again, inspect them for cracks or dents, wipe the exterior with a clean rag, and put them away. If they have sand or other junk in them, I take them apart, hose them out with brake cleaner, and reassemble. The same five mags have seen me through four years of IPSC shooting.
 

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If the magazines have removable baseplates I strip them completely first time.

Clean all with a degreaser like Tetra's or Gun Scrubber. Then coat everything inside and out with Tetra Gun Lube or Tetra Gun Grease (you don't need to saturate it - a VERY thin spread film so it just looks "wet" will do). Use a patch (tweezers or something wood for the inside of the mag - or Q-Tips) to do this.

Make sure before you start that the Lube or Grease is well-mixed; it "settles" in the containers I think. With the grease in the tubes, drive all the air out, cinch down the cap, then massage it to mix. If you get the larger tubs of grease this isn't a problem.

Then take paper towels and dry then thoroughly - finish by buffing all surfaces possible. Tetra's properties leave an ultra-thin film bonded to the metal, and it is dry. It will protect VERY well against corrosion, and makes cleanup after firing a breeze.

If the baseplates don't come off, you could compress the springs down as far as possible, lock them with a punch or the like if you have the holes there - Tetra make a spray combination cleaner/Lube that will accomplish what is described, except you wouldn't be able to dry the bottom/inside of the mag and spring completely. But this spray Lube/Cleaner partly evaporates, so it really does leave a very thin film. Anytime I use it in areas like revolver trigger actions I just stand the item up with paper towel stuffed anywhere I can get it in. The next day there will not be enough "fluid" there to run and get anywhere it is not supposed to.

I have used the stuff on a standard Browning HP; it is the only thing I have found that impedes the rust that was constantly trying to take hold on the hammer from humidity and sweat. It works just great on everything else too.
 
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