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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an Ed Brown Tac Ambi Safety I would like to install. Is there a FAQ that has instructions for installing an ambi safety?

Thanks
 

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It's basically the same as a std safety,but you need to relieve the right grip to allow the retention tab to swing freely under it.The Sight or www.m1911.org.com has pretty good instructions on the basic fitting.If you never did this before,pick up a cheap safety somewhere to do your first on.It's easy to cut the wrong angle or go too far,and an ambi is expensive to turn to junk.Also,mate and polish the joint of the 2 halves so it rotates like a solid pin in the grip safety.Hope this helps
 

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Recently I installed an Ed Brown ambi saftey on
my Colt. Careful fitting gave me a good looking
positive right or left hand orerating thumb safety. However, after shooting 100 rounds , the area of my hand that contacts the rear portion of the right side of the safety was getting quite a beating. It seems to be too squared off and I had to dehorn it a bit. The kicker is that it did not want to come apart very easy. So you may want to defang yours prior to pressing the two halves together then add a little cold blueing.
Now I really like it.
 

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Originally posted by gewehr3:
I have an Ed Brown Tac Ambi Safety I would like to install. Is there a FAQ that has instructions for installing an ambi safety?
Thanks
While I don't advocate an untrained person attempting to install a critical safety related component such as a grip safety. I will describe the difference in the ambi unit. First of all, the sear and hammer pins are all smooth on the right side. The pins have to be flat on the right side. Because the pins protrude on the right side of the frame and need to be flat to allow the right lever to move up and down. So right off the bat, the hammer/sear pins are ambi style. The grip needs a slot cut in the right pannel to allow the ambi unit to move up and down. The grip, hammer and sear pins are therefore different. Have it installed by a 1911 qualified and properly licensed person. Good luck

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HeiloMan,
I strongly agree with your post. Good advice. But could you expand on "properly licensed person"?

Originally posted by HeiloMan:
. . . Have it installed by a 1911 qualified and properly licensed person. Good luck

[/B]
 

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I've installed a half-dozen (am working on one now), and while it is very important that it be done properly, doing so is not outside the abilities of anyone who understands how the safety operates. Assemble the gun without the grip safety in place, and operate the stock safety to see where/how the safety interacts with the sear. There should be enough extra material on the ambi that it won't even go into the frame until some of the excess is removed. You must know exactly where and how much to remove, or you will have both a dangerous gun and a trashed part. Removing the safety plunger from the plunger tube will make it easier to do the repeated installation and removal that will be required to get the fit just right. Do the final fitting with the off-side lever in place, to make sure the safety stud is aligned exactly as it will be when the gun is fully assembled. Even when the part is functional, there can still be some "art" to getting a nice, crisp release. As noted above, make sure the pin is smooth at the joint, and that the grip panel is properly relieved. Go slow - measure twice, cut once.
 

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Originally posted by Slo cat:
HeiloMan,
I strongly agree with your post. Good advice. But could you expand on "properly licensed person"?
Slow Cat,
That the poor bastard doesn't give the gun to some clown that does not have an F.F.L. and other appropriate legal authority. You know, a reputable gunsmith (who is also properly trained in the repair of 1911's).


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Originally posted by RickB:
I've installed a half-dozen (am working on one now), and while it is very important that it be done properly, doing so is not outside the abilities of anyone who understands how the safety operates. Assemble the gun without the grip safety in place, and operate the stock safety to see where/how the safety interacts with the sear. There should be enough extra material on the ambi that it won't even go into the frame until some of the excess is removed. You must know exactly where and how much to remove, or you will have both a dangerous gun and a trashed part. Removing the safety plunger from the plunger tube will make it easier to do the repeated installation and removal that will be required to get the fit just right. Do the final fitting with the off-side lever in place, to make sure the safety stud is aligned exactly as it will be when the gun is fully assembled. Even when the part is functional, there can still be some "art" to getting a nice, crisp release. As noted above, make sure the pin is smooth at the joint, and that the grip panel is properly relieved. Go slow - measure twice, cut once.
RickB,
I think many people don't understand how the thumb safety indexes and the lobe arrests what I call the "foot" of the sear. It is not just enough to remove metal off the thumb safety's lobe to have the thumb safety index upwards. The lobe must be very closely fit to both index (engaged position) and maintain almost 0 clearance (in fully indexed position) relative to the sears "feet". Mindlessly removing metal to get the thumb safety to move upwards will not do the job. The thumb safety has to be closely fit to the sear to index and arrest the sear.



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H-Man - Where/when did I tell him to "mindlessly remove metal"? I'm no gunsmith, never even took metal shop in high school, but I have successfully installed a half-dozen ambi's (and received compliments on the crisp action of same, BTW). If I can do it, so can anyone else who will take the time to figure out how the safety works, as I suggested, removes only the necessary material, as suggested, and proceeds with caution, as suggested. If you need a licensed gunsmith to do your ambi's, that's fine, but I still think fitting one is not beyond the capabilities of anyone who will take the time to pay attention to the details. If, after my description of the process, someone decides they need the services of a gunsmith, that's fine. Some of us would rather do it ourselves (just like we might like to install our own brake pads, sharpen our knives, or wire our homes).
 

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Originally posted by RickB:
H-Man - Where/when did I tell him to "mindlessly remove metal"? I'm no gunsmith, never even took metal shop in high school, but I have successfully installed a half-dozen ambi's (and received compliments on the crisp action of same, BTW). If I can do it, so can anyone else who will take the time to figure out how the safety works, as I suggested, removes only the necessary material, as suggested, and proceeds with caution, as suggested. If you need a licensed gunsmith to do your ambi's, that's fine, but I still think fitting one is not beyond the capabilities of anyone who will take the time to pay attention to the details. If, after my description of the process, someone decides they need the services of a gunsmith, that's fine. Some of us would rather do it ourselves (just like we might like to install our own brake pads, sharpen our knives, or wire our homes).
RickB, I think you are being needlessly defensive. I don't think I was even making reference to your posts. I was merely pointing out that the function of the safety is to arrest the sears feet. One member suggested in the past that the gun should be drawn to full cock and checked for a clicking sound. Yes, this is the Colt Armorer/Technician test to see if there is a clicking sound. Proof that the gun is unsafe and the sear has moved. I've seen so-called gunsmiths botch the job. With the safety engaged and the hammer cocked. Take up slack and I've heard small clicks in various weapons. I always throw that stuff in about a licensed gunsmith so some putz doesn't give his gun to somebody and never gets the gun back. Don't be so defensive. Your post was not lowered or criticized in any shape, way or form. I've got a lot of manufacturers time and training. My training has been an immense benefit in learning about quality pistolsmithing. But I must admit, revolvers are my love.

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[This message has been edited by HeiloMan (edited 09-14-2001).]
 

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No problem. I find that professional gunsmiths often have the natural tendency to recommend the services of a gunsmith for everything - such as "fitting" grip panels, or "fitting" recoil spring guides - and I think it fosters the impression among new 1911 shooters/owners that the gun is very complicated or finicky. It is certainly easy to screw one up, if one does not know what they're abou. Gewehr3 posted that his experience was more of a hassle than he imagined, and it's not over yet - he might send more customers your way, than he will convince others to give it a try.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
This post is merely a follow up on my ambi safety installation adventure.


First off, I believe any gun enthusiast is going to at some point have to learn how to install parts on their guns. Spending $35 to ship a pistol and waiting months for work to get done is a major motivating factor for me to do SOME of my own work. Of course, you have to know your own limitations but, you just have to get your feet wet and try. Sure you may screw up a part and buy another but, its a learning process. There is always some risk involved. Who wants to pay a gunsmith and ship the pistol to install a small part like a trigger ($13 part)? A barrel or expensive night sights I can understand having the work done by a gunsmith. Mainly because the parts are too expensive to junk if you screw up and some of the parts require expensive specialized tools to fit correctly.

If a person will learn exactly how their pistol functions and how the parts work together, be PATIENT, and invest in good tools and reference books, then some parts fitting is not beyond the average person's ability.

The reason installing the Brown ambi safety was difficult was because one has to file awkward angles with needle files. This is very time consuming, requires alot of concentration, and tiny filing movements . I am very happy with the results, except the safety detent doesn't align all the way with the safety plunger.

I am sure installing my second ambi saftey will go much smoother.

Thanks all for the help and good luck.
 
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