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How is the nice even chamfer on the edges of hammers done? The one pictured may be done in the mold. How is it done on the machined hammers? I could use a file or sand paper to take the sharp edge off, but I want it to look even.
 

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The perfection is achieved by CNC equipment.

LOG
 

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There's a number of methods from being a real pro with files and abrasives, to using a milling machine, to using a precision surface grinder.
 

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The question wasn't how can this be done by hand, but simply how was it done. If you look at the C&S, Extreme Engineering, and Vickers Blue Force 1911 Gear you will see the same chamfer, it's been machined that way.

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Not this.
I hate to disagree with you, but that's how I do all the ones that I get in the shop that have a sharp edge.

I have a carbide engraving bit that I put in my die grinder, give it a nice edge break and then switch to a pink chainsaw sharpening stone to smooth it out so it is nice and even.

Once that is done, I put in an MX 1/4 X 1/2 inch bit and polish the grind marks from the sharpening stone and final polish it with a felt bob and some 555.

I've done this a few times so I have had practice though. A very steady couple of hands (I don't put it in a vice) and you would be surprised what the results can be had.

I just wanted to throw that out there. I'll try to get some pics for you to see and post them.

Take care,
Bob
 

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You might use the Cratex as part of the finish process, but would be very slow and would lose a lot of points if that was all you used. Cratex breaks done quickly on edges and would be difficult to maintain a shape also. Small files and time.

LOG
 

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I hate to disagree with you, but that's how I do all the ones that I get in the shop that have a sharp edge.

I have a carbide engraving bit that I put in my die grinder, give it a nice edge break and then switch to a pink chainsaw sharpening stone to smooth it out so it is nice and even.

Once that is done, I put in an MX 1/4 X 1/2 inch bit and polish the grind marks from the sharpening stone and final polish it with a felt bob and some 555.

I've done this a few times so I have had practice though. A very steady couple of hands (I don't put it in a vice) and you would be surprised what the results can be had.

I just wanted to throw that out there. I'll try to get some pics for you to see and post them.

Take care,
Bob
Dr. Bob... no offense but you do this for a living. Probably have messed up parts learning too. Arm chair gunsmiths would do this, mess something up, then blame the part and bad mouth it.
 

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You might use the Cratex as part of the finish process, but would be very slow and would lose a lot of points if that was all you used. Cratex breaks done quickly on edges and would be difficult to maintain a shape also. Small files and time.

LOG
I use the carbide cutter to get the bevel started, but it's not a smooth and equidistant champfer, so that's why I switch to the chainsaw sharpening stone. This evens up the profile so it's all nice and neat. The MX does wear fast, especially around the serrations so the previous tools are used. All I do is use the MX to buff out the grinding marks left by the stone. The final felt bob is to give it that nice luster that the CNC profiling tool like Cylinder and Slide turns out.

I really need to post some pictures of the in process. Let me go out to the shop and see if I have a hammer that needs this done and I'll snap some pics.

Bob

Dr. Bob... no offense but you do this for a living. Probably have messed up parts learning too. Arm chair gunsmiths would do this, mess something up, then blame the part and bad mouth it.
Oh, no offense taken - I'd never get offended for somebody remarking like that. You drive a sincere point. As I said just a few lines ago, I'll try to see if I can get a hammer out and do some pictures for you all to see. Maybe this will help some of you and give some alternatives or ideas for a process that works for those that are interested.

Bob


One more thing, when I do this operation in the fashion I explained, I use almost ZERO pressure with the tool on the part. This is very, very important. It takes a little while to get done, but light and long strokes works best.
 

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That's the one thing I don't like about Wilson Combats hammers. Arguably the best hammer out there, but it takes forever to bevel them nicely. You could skin a deer with them when new.
 

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Well, I looked through the shop, and I don't have any without a bevel to take pictures and post a "how to." I suppose if there is anyone out there that has a really sharp hammer, and would like it beveled, if you want to send it into me I'll bevel it and send it back. I'll use it to take the pictures and post for you all.

I won't have it very long at all - but remember I go to school full time and only come home on the weekends to work. That fact will add a few days to the wait, but I'll do it immediately and get it back out.

If there are any takers, just shoot me a PM for my address and I'll be happy to do this.

Take care,
Bob
 
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