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I wish that every handgun that I owned had tritium sights on it...I am going broke converting them...What do you think of tritium sights...JM
 

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They are great for low light situations...and for finding your gun from a dead sleep...

Just be sure you ID your target first!
 

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I don't rely on them, but do consider them a huge potential bonus. Two things you need for night shooting. One is to see the target and one is to know exactly where your gun is pointed. You can do that with lasers or night sights. Night sights don't immediately disclose your location like a laser.

Some people claim their night sights don't work all that great. From what I have found, they are useful when lighting is such that I can't see my sights normally. In other words, it needs to be pretty dark before they are effective, but then they are very effective.

I really like the idea that night sights are passive. You don't have to activate them in any manner. Plus, they are long lasted and there are no batteries to change.

Night sights won't replace flashlights. You need a flashlight to help illuminate the target and target area. You need flashlights for searching out targets.

Oh, and I agree with LW McVay, I can find my gun in the dark very easily, even after being awakened in the dark during a deep sleep.
 

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Good point DNS...a good flashlight is mandatory at night or even low light.

Absolutely ID the target FIRST...
 

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DNS is right: before you can use night sights, you have to be able to ID your target. If it's too dark to see your sights, it's probably too dark to identify your target as a threat. If you're strapped for cash, a flashlight is probably a better investment than nightsights. A flashlight and the balance spent on some ammo to practice shooting in low-light with the flashlight is even better.

My PD has a yearly low light qualification in addition to 2x/year daylight. Same course except low light. Really, really low light with no flashlights allowed. It usually isn't until the 15 yard line (far beyond where most shootings occur), that you can tell a difference between the night-sight equipped guns and the plain sights.

Before they were common, I didn't feel helpless without nightsights. After spending many years on midnight shift patrol and drawing my pistol many, many times (never firing, thank God), I cannot recall a single episode where I drew my pistol and could not see my sights because it was too dark.

Having said that, if you have the cash to spend, I think night sights are a worthy addition to a pistol. I'd put them on the one I carry and leave the others alone. Money probably better spent elsewhere.
 

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Like "double naught spy", I think "rely" is too strong a word. They can be helpful in a narrow range of lighting where it is too dark to see one's sights, but light enough to ID one's target. Even in this context, they are most helpful if the shooter has to fire from a contorted position for which he has developed no "muscle memory". If the shooter is well-practiced and can fire from his normal stance, very good results can be had with non-illuminated sights.

Once it gets too dark to ID the target, then one needs a flashlight and the issue of night-sights becomes moot.

Personally, I think a single tritium dot in the front sight only is the best set-up.

Rosco
 

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Well put, guys - I'm a little to late entering this thread to add anything that hasn't been (well) said here already.
 

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Well I had was composing a "great" response to this question as I scanned the responses but, once again, Rosco beat me to it.. just ditto what he said.

FWIW, I installed only a tritium front sight on my most used 1911 and used that in the 2000 RM Winter Region Championship... it seemed to work
Of course competition is not the absolute test of things combative but that was a particularly relevant match.

On the other hand Chris Edwards shot a Glock in .357 Sig. After the first shot he did not need night sights or flashlight


Carry on,
Jim Higginbotham
 

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I'm also a believer in Tritium night sights. When it's just getting dark at the range, I find them extremely useful for target alignment. I have them on just about every gun I own.

[This message has been edited by traevin (edited 04-14-2001).]
 

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Truth be known, the flashlight will get more use than your tritium sights any day. I carry a Scorpion light I really like. When it is not being used to spotlight targets at the range, it is employed in dangerous tasks like looking for my car keys I dropped in the yard, tracking down a critter out back, and looking around and in my car at night in the parkinglot before I get in.

Tritium sights are a warm and fuzzy addition - not necessary, but they make me feel warm and fuzzy knowing they are there.

While the flashlight gets more actual use, the tritium sights are like the gun itself in that when you need a gun, you really need it and when you need to see your sights, you really need to see them. I don't think there is much grey area on this for me.
 

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Jim... you know how I do it... I use the Coonan to light up the room first.. then while the bad guys are blinded... I shoot them with my 1911.


FYI, Sr. McCord got that Coonan running hunert percent now. What a hoot to play with.


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Bubba
www.dbl-tap.com
 

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I have them on my guns that I would use at night. I like them. Rely is too strong a word for me.

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Get your 1911s and AR15s while you still can!
 

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Heinie Slant Pro's with tritium on front only, for me. Like Rosco sez.

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The person formerly known as Covert Mission.
 

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I won't own a defensive gun without them, including my 870. And, a tactical flashlight is essential.

Three reasons for light:
1) to be able to move
2) to be able to id your target
3) to be able to acquire your target.

In darkness, you will usually need the light for #2 and night sights for # 3. In low light, you may be fine with no light and night sights.

The key is: Practice, practice, practice with both.
 

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Originally posted by Bubba:
Jim... you know how I do it... I use the Coonan to light up the room first.. then while the bad guys are blinded... I shoot them with my 1911.


FYI, Sr. McCord got that Coonan running hunert percent now. What a hoot to play with.



There you go! There is a use for everything.

Jim H.
 

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The range of lighting in which the light gap between the front sight and the rear notch can be washed out making the front hard to pick up is far too wide to be without a white dot.

The range of lighting in which a dark background will eliminate your front sight from existence is far too wide to be without that bit of radioactive gas-under-glass.

Just from what I've seen, which is damn little. I feel better knowing they're there, and that may make as much difference as anything.

TRB
 
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