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Okay I realize this is mostly a hypothetical question but on average how many rounds do you think were fired an M-1911A1 pistol. Let's say, for an example, a Remington Rand built in 1943 and served at a garrison in the U.S. during World War II, but saw service in Korea with an infantry captain, with an MP in Saigon during Vietnam, and finished out its days being fired by recruits in basic training at Fort Bliss, Texas before being retired in 1985 when the M-9 entered service. Heh, I already find this gun endearing and it's not even real...
 

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Somewhere between 1 to 300,000 rounds. Some were almost never fired, while others were used for fam firing and got more than their fair share.
 

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USGI M1911s

The ones that went to the navy and spent their lives aboard ship were in all likelyhood fired very little.I spent four years on a submarine and the only use the 45s ever got was when the topside watch dropped the parts into the super structure during the mid watch.I was on a cruiser that had a pistol team and the weapons got a little use.I was on a landing ship that had a very large armory,must have had 50 or more 45s.In three years I saw them shot once!I guess its pretty much a crap shoot.I have my uncles Colt that he carried in the island landings during WW11.Its pretty much pitted on the outside but fine inside.Told me he never fired it at anything during combat(he was a Lt.(Calvery)USA.
 

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The pistols at the range probably caught it the worse. The one I was issued in Viet Nam, I fired every chance I could. I had three or four loaded mags plus at least 50 rounds in a box. Once while guarding Liberty Bridge, we were given a bunch of M-16 and .45 ammo that had gotten a little tarnished. We were instructed to shot at anything that floated down the Song Bon Thu (Song in Viet is river) we did! I skipped rounds like a rock, I shot at tree limbs floating by and even the corpse of an NVA soldier that was floating along. It was cool to fire one in the air and see how long it took to make a splash.

Okay, enough b/s. I have a Series 70 Gold Cup that I used as a target pistol in 2700 matches for years. I can't even begin to imagine how many rounds I put through it. I do know at one point I was storing all the spent primers from my reloads in a large size mayonaisse jar. I filled that jar with spent primers in something like 7 months or so. After that, I didn't bother. I bought cast bullets by the 1,000 count, and primers too. They didn't last long. I haven't worn out my Dillion 550, buy it shows some wear. The Gold Cup? Still has original barrel, and all other parts. The only thing that I replaced was the pin that holds the rear sight in place. The bonus, I bought that gun used from another bullseye shooter and have no idea how much he used it. Granted, the loads are lighter, and the bullets cast lead instead of FMJ, but still consider the punishment that gun has taken.

The worst I've seen USGI guns is due to rust and barrels ruined from not cleaning after using corrosive ammo (all ammo used during WWII and Korea too was corroisive), and Bubba. They will take a lickin and keep on tickin.
 

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That "fam firing" as dsk calls it, is familiarization firing. In my army period, it meant a half small tables with pistols on them. Whole companies of 200 men were marched to the range, and six at a time went to the firing line and each fired two magazines in about a minute or less. Then another six, and another. When that company was done, there was another waiting. Roughly 0800-1700, five days a week, sometimes six. Anyone who wants to do the math can figure out the number of rounds each pistol took in a month or a year, but believe me, it wore out pistols.

Jim
 
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