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I’m 72 yr old and have finally had a few lessons manage to stay in my head. About 35 yr ago a good friend introduced me to shotgun sports. One of the first lessons he taught me was to never shoot a reload from someone unless I really knew that they were a good safe reloader. His favorite saying was, some people are sloppy careless reloaders. He would go on to say that some people should never be allowed to reload. A policy I have adhered to shooting 3 position and shooting pistols.
Sounds like my kind of fellow.

Enjoy your new press.
I can also appreciate Joe's advice.

I became a shooting addict when assigned to a Coast Guard cutter at Base Kodiak in the 70's. We had WWII vintage indoor shooting range which overlooked the base housing complex (and which was later shut down when the backstop was found to be "operationally deficient"). The shooting positions were separated by hanging sheets of 3/4" plywood. I was shooting in the company of a Master Chief and a new fellow. The new guy was shooting a Charter Arms .44 that he had just purchased. The new guy fired his first round with a tremendous explosion. I looked over and saw that his cylinder and top strap were blown apart. I saw a good size chunk of the cylinder embedded in the plywood right next to where I was shooting.

Once the dust settled, the Master Chief asked in a very calm tone "Where did you get those rounds." The new guy said "I loaded them myself." He was pretty clueless and the Master Chief engaged him in dialogue, ultimately learning that he had purchased a reloading press and components, filled a 44 special case to the brim with Bullseye powder and then set the bullet. He had watched others reloading and thought that was all that was involved.

Be careful out there.
 

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Dillon 1050 warranty....

Dillon views their D1050 machines as a commercial grade reloading press, and do not have a full lifetime warranty on the machine like the D550 or D650 and similar models.

However, they are very robust machines, and are built to last...… I believe I have reloaded close to 1/2 million rounds of ammo on my D1050 without issue, and my only cost to fix the unit over my years of reloading was a case feeder switch for $6.50..... :)
 

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Not as much as you would think.

I load all my long range ammo (600-2200 yards) from 223 Ackley to 338 Lapua on a Dillon 550. I use a prometheus and fx-120 as powder scale/dispensers.

That is very reassuring.

Hoping to have some .30'06 load work up taking place soon...maybe next week.... on my 550C.

Shopping around for a chronograph now.



First, let me say Thank You to everyone who answered.

I’m 72 yr old and have finally had a few lessons manage to stay in my head. About 35 yr ago a good friend introduced me to shotgun sports. One of the first lessons he taught me was to never shoot a reload from someone unless I really knew that they were a good safe reloader. His favorite saying was, some people are sloppy careless reloaders. He would go on to say that some people should never be allowed to reload. A policy I have adhered to shooting 3 position and shooting pistols.

If you ask someone for advice and they are qualified to give you advice I think you should pay attention.

A picture is worth a thousand words.

I invite anyone to look back to post # 2. One of the nicest reloading rooms I have ever seen. I thought that the only people who had a Prometheus powder measure had ballistic labs.

Like I said, a picture is worth a thousand words, and read the recommendation that Tom Freeman made.

I have learned to take good advice. I ordered a 1050 today. Set up to load 45 acp and only 45 acp. The mention of 6.5 284 was my attempt at dry humor. I need to quit that stuff. If this run on components lasts, I might be forced to buy the parts to change over to 9mm. I don’t even shoot my 9mm guns right now.

A heartfelt Thank You to Tom Freeman, DubfromGa,1911-9mm, JMorris and BLACKTAIL 8541.


I'm really looking forward to seeing you get that sweet 1050 up and running. You'll have your very own .45acp ammo factory to enjoy. :)


I'll bet you will be very, very pleased with it.
 

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But it is worth nothing that while Dillon offers a "No BS" warranty on the majority of their product line, and has an excellent reputation for standing behind that warranty, you get a "BS" warranty with the 1050/1100.
I have been loading on 1050s since the mid to late 90s.

I have needed to use their warranty exactly zero times.

I did break one part (lower link arm, machined aluminum) and it was totally my fault for being stupid with an autodrive.
 

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I have had to replace the plastic primer tube tips but they have yet to charge me for them because it’s the same ones they use on the SD, 550 ‘s I have.

IIRC you swapped yours out with 650 tubes, might be a more permanent solution.
 

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I have a very early Super 1050. When I posted on Benos that my plate advance was jerky, a Dillon rep posted that there was a new cam and I should call in to get it. I did, but the clerk I got was going to charge me $71. I said No, thanks, and called back later. I got my original correspondent who sent me the part for free.

I understand the new 1100 has a two year guarantee.

Anecdote Alert:
"Once the dust settled, the Master Chief asked in a very calm tone "Where did you get those rounds." The new guy said "I loaded them myself." He was pretty clueless and the Master Chief engaged him in dialogue, ultimately learning that he had purchased a reloading press and components, filled a 44 special case to the brim with Bullseye powder and then set the bullet. He had watched others reloading and thought that was all that was involved."

We had a guy like that. He was semi-literate and did not comprehend the numbers on the powder cans. He figured "Rifle Powder" was rifle powder and filled up the case. After all, if they had wanted you to use less powder, they would have made the case smaller, wouldn't they?
He was on his third .300 Win Mag when my friend who worked at the only local source of components realized what was happening and thereafter would only sell him H870.
 

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I have a very early Super 1050. When I posted on Benos that my plate advance was jerky, a Dillon rep posted that there was a new cam and I should call in to get it. I did, but the clerk I got was going to charge me $71. I said No, thanks, and called back later. I got my original correspondent who sent me the part for free.

Anecdote Alert:
"Once the dust settled, the Master Chief asked in a very calm tone "Where did you get those rounds." The new guy said "I loaded them myself." He was pretty clueless and the Master Chief engaged him in dialogue, ultimately learning that he had purchased a reloading press and components, filled a 44 special case to the brim with Bullseye powder and then set the bullet. He had watched others reloading and thought that was all that was involved."

We had a guy like that. He was semi-literate and did not comprehend the numbers on the powder cans. He figured "Rifle Powder" was rifle powder and filled up the case. After all, if they had wanted you to use less powder, they would have made the case smaller, wouldn't they?
He was on his third .300 Win Mag when my friend who worked at the only local source of components realized what was happening and thereafter would only sell him H870.

We called him "Scoops" from his habit of scooping the case full of powder from a bowl.
Same deal on .44 Magnum, all they would sell him was 4227. A case full of 4227 is an overload but a Super Blackhawk will stand it.


Mr Scoops...... :biglaugh: :biglaugh: :biglaugh: :biglaugh:
 

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On 2/21/2020 I posted asking opinions on a good progressive reloader. After a lot of input from forum members I ordered a Xl 750. My barn has a 12 x 12 ft above ground tornado shelter in it. I am making it my reloading room. Since it is still too cold to paint the concrete walls I am at an impasse. The dealer in Oklahoma City called me the other day and asked if my room was ready, I told him no and he said he would like to sell the 750 as he had a customer and I was agreeable as he could reorder it next month.

The mayor of Ok. City has since declared a city emergency. I won’t go near Ok. City as my wife’s Pulmonologist is adamant that she must not contract even the ordinary flu. If I get anything and bring it home, it could get serious really fast.

I will order a reloader from Dillon next Tuesday, but with the current ammo shortage, believe it or not, my wife insists I get the best. I was afraid this was coming and stocked up on components so I am good there.

Now the $64,000 question for those forum members who have used a 650/750 and a Super 1050. Is the Super 1050, in your opinion, worth the difference in cost between a pimped out XL750 and a Super 1050.
The question you should be asking is whether or not you actually need that level of press. If you're like most of us, buying at that level will take forever to amortize. If your reason for a progressive press is to speed up production, that's fine, but you can get a good progressive that will provide all the speed you need for a hell of a lot less money. I'm not saying Dillon isn't high quality, it is. But a 1050 is production grade, and I seriously doubt you need that kind of power. A 650 is plenty, but then so is the Hornady LnL AP. Use the money you save on the press for extra components, dies, etc.

Of course, if you're independently wealthy, and money is not an issue, go for it. That doesn't necessarily mean you're getting the best, either. That's a rather subjective thing. When I bought my LnL AP, money was not an issue -- I could've bought a Dillon. But, the powder measure setup on the LnL is better than Dillons, and I likes their quick change die bushings, as well as how the press is laid out. In other words, I based my choice on functionality, not on name recognition or the opinions of fans.

Whatever you choose, I hope it is based on actual needs and best functionality, and not whether its red or blue.
 

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Time is money. Thats one thing few people take into account.

Some people like reloading. It is relaxing. Some of them might even shoot just so they can get back to reloading.

I prefer to spend my free time at the range.
 

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I have a bad right shoulder, the S1050 is very easy on it. Not pushing at the top of the stroke to seat a primer is much easier for me. I shoot mostly .45acp but have 9mm and .223 conversions.
OP, I predict you will not regret the choice.
 

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Dillon 1050 and Super 1050

Since I shoot and reload a great deal of 9mm ammo, the one thing that separates the D1050 machines from most all other progressive presses is it swages the primer pockets whether it is needed or not. All it takes is a few military crimped 9mm cases to really slow the reloading process down if you don't have a D1050.

I believe a person should consider whether or not to purchase a D1050 based on how much volume they shoot......Once a person shoots roughly 1,000 rounds of ammo per month, it would be worth it to invest in a D1050.....less time reloading will allow more time at the shooting range....! :rock:
 

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The question you should be asking is whether or not you actually need that level of press. If you're like most of us, buying at that level will take forever to amortize. If your reason for a progressive press is to speed up production, that's fine, but you can get a good progressive that will provide all the speed you need for a hell of a lot less money. I'm not saying Dillon isn't high quality, it is. But a 1050 is production grade, and I seriously doubt you need that kind of power. A 650 is plenty, but then so is the Hornady LnL AP. Use the money you save on the press for extra components, dies, etc.

Of course, if you're independently wealthy, and money is not an issue, go for it. That doesn't necessarily mean you're getting the best, either. That's a rather subjective thing. When I bought my LnL AP, money was not an issue -- I could've bought a Dillon. But, the powder measure setup on the LnL is better than Dillons, and I likes their quick change die bushings, as well as how the press is laid out. In other words, I based my choice on functionality, not on name recognition or the opinions of fans.

Whatever you choose, I hope it is based on actual needs and best functionality, and not whether its red or blue.
Rifter, I agree with your post except if I was independently wealthy, I would simply buy all the factory ammo I wanted and blast away!
 

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I am not saving a whole lot on 9mm IF you consider 147 gr subsonic vs 115 gr econoball. But like for like, it would cost about double my reload expense to buy what I shoot the most of at IDPA and USPSA.

Now .45 is a different matter. I don't know anybody selling the loads that I use, .45 Minor for practice and match, Barely Major for taking the Commander to town.
 

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either you saw a better deal on econoball than I did or you are shooting a premium bullet...

The cheapest factory 9mm I saw in the last couple months was $9/box of 50 or $0.18/ea.
 

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I have a bad right shoulder, the S1050 is very easy on it. Not pushing at the top of the stroke to seat a primer is much easier for me. I shoot mostly .45acp but have 9mm and .223 conversions.
OP, I predict you will not regret the choice.

Shoulder saving is highly relevant to my interests I'm delaying having my right shoulder replaced. We have some other family health issues that are more pressing at this time. Down the road I'll address the shoulder. Got love, live and thrive in the meantime. Still doing fun stuff...just being mindful to find methods that are easier on my body.

I've never played with a 1050 or 1100....just watched the videos. I couldn't tell what type of effort was required nor at which point in the stroke the force was greatest. Thanks for the insight.




Since I shoot and reload a great deal of 9mm ammo, the one thing that separates the D1050 machines from most all other progressive presses is it swages the primer pockets whether it is needed or not. All it takes is a few military crimped 9mm cases to really slow the reloading process down if you don't have a D1050.

I believe a person should consider whether or not to purchase a D1050 based on how much volume they shoot......Once a person shoots roughly 1,000 rounds of ammo per month, it would be worth it to invest in a D1050.....less time reloading will allow more time at the shooting range....! :rock:

Some buddies and I recently had the discussion about reloading and the current times we are living in. We said we'd not be adding any new presses for the rest of 2020....just trying to hold our own with what we already have....and keep adding components as we could find them on sale.

If Trump is re-elected then we all agreed we'd be burning up the phone lines to the Dillon mothership. :biglaugh: Everyone threw out what their ideal setup would be.


I'd keep rolling my hunting rifle loads on the existing 550C and keep the running .45acp, .44mag and 10mm on the existing 750 with an occasional swap over for runs of .38Super.

The call to the Dillon mothership would be to go nuts and unleash the Krakkens for two dedicated 1100's....one in 9mm and other other in .223/5.56. :rock:

The next money spent would be to do annual or longer range membership to the local indoor/outdoor spot that is less than a 10 minute drive from home. :rock:

Now....in the meantime prior to his hopeful re-election.....I'll need to purchase a winning lottery ticket...even a $10K scratch-off ticket would do nicely and leave room for new gun safe, bigger bench & storage.......and maybe one nice new pistol or rifle. :rock:






Time is money. Thats one thing few people take into account.

Some people like reloading. It is relaxing. Some of them might even shoot just so they can get back to reloading.

I prefer to spend my free time at the range.


I think I've had more fun simply shopping around for my reloading gear and checking off the list than I've ever expected. It's been an oasis of fun & source of good reading and such in between stressful life & work situations. At the end of each day its nice to sit down in the easy chair with a glass of iced tea and the newest Blue Press......or on a cold morning off-work to have the fire going, dogs asleep nearby and have a cup of hot coffee and a warm fire rolling.....and the MackBook open to reloading & shooting sites.


Therapeutic even in the beginning planning stages. That's good & welcome stuff.
 
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