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Once you pay for your initial setup, how much does it cost per 1000 to reload? What all goes into reloading? brass, bullet, primer, powder? Where do you buy all the supplies needed? I would be sharing costs among three people for a press so that cost is not as much an issue, but if I bought a Dillon 550, what else would I need. Also, what are good books to teach the basics?
 

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I would suggest a single station reloading press to start out with. There is much to learn about the reloading process. When working up a load, the single stage press is hard to beat. When you arrive at a pet load, get a progressive loader and crank out a ga-zillion of them. I have bought my primers at the gun shows to save on the haz-mat charges and find that they run around $15/k or 1.5 cents a round. The bullet cost depends on the caliber and the type. Full metal jacket costs more than cast lead. Casting your own costs the least. I've got my .45 loads under 5 cents a round. I cast my own and lube and size them. Store bought FMJ bullets are around 5 to 6 cents apiece. Primers are 1.5 cents, powder about 0.5 cents and brass around 4 to 5 cents. The brass cost goes away if you gather it up after shooting it. I've reloaded the same brass more than 30 times and it still works ok. I am currently experimenting with Precision Cast bullets to find out if the guys there will put me out of the bullet casting business.
op2
 

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1K of Starline brass = $93 (includes shipping), good for 20 loadings, so $93/20 = $4.65.

14oz of Hodgdon Clays = $16, good for 1200 rnds. So $16/1200 * 1000/1200 = $13.33.

1K of WLP primers = $18

1K of Oregon Trail 180gr LSWC = $53 (includes shipping).

So $53 + $18 + $13.33 + $4.65 = $92.98.

If you buy your bullets from a local caster your bullet price would drop to $34/1000.
 

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Most of the manuals do a good job of teaching the basics, and do it in a step-by-step approach.

IMO, the Lyman 47th edition is currently the best of the bundh.

They go through the process step-by-step for both rifle and pistol, and show you what the basic equipment you need to get started looks like, what it does, and how to use it.

I got mine a couple of years ago, so it has likely been updated, but I still use it without concern. It cost me $20 if I remember right. Well worth the price.

Most gun stores will have it, along with the components you'll need: primers, cases (new), projectiles (if you don't want to wait for mail order delivery), propellants, case lube, shell holders, and so on. Some sporting goods stores will, too, but your best bet is to stop by your favorite gun store first.



[This message has been edited by feedramp (edited 10-15-2001).]
 

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I don't reload, but several buddies do. The cost to reload is cheap, but where the major expense comes in is with the time involved in the process. I can't afford the time of reloading, so it is actually cheaper for me to buy ammo.
 

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The NRA offers an excellent reloading course. Suggest you contact the NRA for an instructor in your area. GLV
 

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I bought a Dillon 550 for around 500 for everything to reload 45 including the brass cleaner and scale. It costs me about $4.50 a box but I think I can get that down to less than $4 by buying in bulk.
 

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$2.59 per box, at the last calculation, for ammo with match grade cast bullets. It changes somewhat, depending on variations in component prices.

That would be $51.80 per thousand.

I have to buy bullets in lots of 5,000 to get them for $29 per thousand.
 

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If you want to learn to shoot a handgun, with acceptable skill, you must reload! Or be damn wealthy! If you only want to hit a man-sized silhouette, at 7 yards, then save your money and buy your ammo. Of course, competence breeds confidence, in case you ever need the skill.
 

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My cost for 1000 rounds of .45 auto 200 SWC is $33.25 if I don't include the brass. I get so much .45 brass free that there's no need to include it. I cast my own bullets, so that keeps the price down.

Buying powder in any size more than the 1 Lb container is also a big help.

I buy most of my powder and primers from gun shows where prices are generally lower than anywhere else. The savings on sales tax is usually enough to pay for the ticket and parking.



[This message has been edited by Walking Point (edited 10-20-2001).]
 

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I am coming late to this discussion so forgive me if I am rehasing it. I currently shoot 9mm for two reasons. 1. All my guns are 9mm. 2. I can shoot it for $5-6 for a box of 50.

Are you guys saying that if I reload I can save a few $$ more on 9mm or better yet I can finally buy that 1911 in .45 and be able to afford ammo.

I shoot 1-2 matches a month and practice on the off weeks, so that would be 400-700 rounds per month.
 
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