1911Forum banner

1 - 20 of 38 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Quick question. For those of us who don't like grease - how much oil should I be putting on the slide rails and the frame rails?

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,653 Posts
A couple of drops is more than enough. Spread it along the rails. I don't like grease because the word "grease" can be used to describe many different formulations. Lithium based greases can evaporate out and turn to glue if exposed to the air long enough. I was taught that grease is used in applications with a heavy load bearing where oil would simply be forced out of the joint from the pressure - or in a place where you cannot reach to reapply oil (like a wheel bearing). A 1911 slide does not bear heavy loads - it just reciprocates back and forth. Oil is sufficient for that application. The crankshaft and camshaft of your car's engine have heavy bearing loads but are lubricated with oil because you can't pump grease through the bearings and you can't get at it to replace grease. On a 1911 slide/frame oil will need replacing but it is easy to do. A pistol that is dripping with oil can also have oil soak into a primer and not fire when you desperately need it to. A little oil is all you need.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,190 Posts
A couple of good sized drops of a good petroleum based oil (not Rem Oil or Toad Lube) on each rail slot in the slide and let it run forward and then install on frame and rack back and forth a couple of times. Done. And stay away from the grease.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
The easy answer is; You cannot over oil your 1911. If its dripping off the gun then wipe off any excess but I assure you that oil is not going to cause any problems for your 1911. Now to little oil would be a problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,746 Posts
I get picked on by ex military members because I do have a bit of an oil leakage issue. I use a q-tip and apply 1-2 drops per rail(slide and frame) as well as lubiing springs,... as needed. works for me--who cares what others say. I can wipe off excess. You have a hard time repairing dry guns after they freeze up--JMHO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
589 Posts
You have enough when it runs off your elbow :).

Seriously tho, I've used a batch of Red oil I mixed up over 15 years ago (mixture of Mobile one, ATF & others). I use at least 4-5 drops on each side of the frame & slide. If I have too much it just oozes out and I wipe it off. Then add some to the link, barrel bushing, and area of the slide that the disconnector rides against. Anywhere there's metal to metal friction.

Too much, no. I've got over 55,000 rds down that 1911 wadcutter and it still locks up better than a bank vault while holding under 2 1/2" @ 50 yards for 10 shots with match ammo.

My Dad always said "Oil & grease are cheap, machinery isn't". I try to continue his philosophy.
Al
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,387 Posts
A lot of (perhaps all) good answers already.

If in doubt, I'd personally err on the side of too much and too frequently.

Those, including some manufacturers, who recommend the minimum necessary, are looking to minimize the dirt (etc.) that "excessive" oil can attract (esp. in dirty environments). So they too do have a point. But the risk is that someone may not know what is "just enough", and an error in the direction of "not enough" poses greater concerns.

So until you feel comfortable with the amount/frequency of oil application, I'd suggest erring on the generous side. Worst that can happen is you might have more oil splattered on yourself when shooting and a slightly greater/faster need to clean any dirt that might be attracted by the extra oil.

Excess oil on a fine leather holster would be a slightly different subject (Although I know you didn't ask that specific question).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,664 Posts
As others have stated, just a couple of drops. After applying oil, I rack the slide several times and wipe off the excess oil that comes out the back.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,374 Posts
I get picked on by ex military members because I do have a bit of an oil leakage issue. I use a q-tip and apply 1-2 drops per rail(slide and frame) as well as lubiing springs,... as needed. works for me--who cares what others say. I can wipe off excess. You have a hard time repairing dry guns after they freeze up--JMHO
I am ex military and I let mine drip with liquid love! Most mil guys are use to keeping their weapons dry because of the environment in Southeast Asia.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,149 Posts
I use a tiny dab of Tetra grease on each rail, it stays put and works. I did try Mobil 1 but I don't think it's as slippery as the Tetra grease.
My 2cents. I've also used Breakfree CLP but I usually reoil it between cleanings if I use oil.
When a 1911 gets dry you'll get stoppages.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
Rig + P stainless grease is more like a thicker oil. For those that don't like grease. Thick enough to still apply with Q-tip. Wipes clean after the fact. Use on the typical grease areas. Rig + P stays put longer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
486 Posts
Pour it on, whatever the gun doesn’t like, it’ll squeeze it out. :D

Better to have oiled then to have only oiled lightly. :eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,041 Posts
I seem to remember the Wilson Combat rep post that something like 80% of guns that get sent back to them just need a good cleaning and lube.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,456 Posts
As others have stated, just a couple of drops. After applying oil, I rack the slide several times and wipe off the excess oil that comes out the back.
I agree with this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,425 Posts
After 35 years I'm still using White Lithium on rails and barrel bushing and a drop or two of oil everywhere else. My father has been carrying a 1911 for well over 50 years and does the same.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
413 Posts
I put a couple drops of Hoppe's #9 oil on a q-tip and swab all bearing surfaces replenishing the oil when a good film isn't deposited or when the swab becomes very dirty. I do this to the rails, lugs, slide stop pin holes, bushing, barrel (except the breech), disconnector rail, recoil spring tunnel, spring cap, spring and rear of exposed trigger surface. I do this after every range session and/or cleaning.
 
1 - 20 of 38 Posts
Top