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Wilson Combat EDC X9L, Kimber Custom II gfo
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had previously posted about getting a trigger job for my new Kimber Custom II that just doesn't feel right to me. I figured I would start a new thread and post the videos I took of the trigger right off the bat.

In the first video, you can see the take-up, followed by some resistance to get to the wall. It seems to break smooth after that. Given my lack of experience, what are your thoughts? It kind of feels like I am pulling through instead of coming to a wall and then a clean break
Also, If I am explaining this all wrong, feel free to correct me. I am always up for learning.


In the second video I pulled the trigger, racked the slide, and then started recording to show the reset. It feels like it resets in stages kind of like someone walking and dragging their feet. I am unsure of how long the travel should be for reset.


Let me know your thoughts. I called Kimber and the rep I spoke with told me this was normal and to go ahead and put 500 rounds through it and see how it feels. Personally, I think that is complete BS. I have put about 150 rounds through it thus far. I went to the gun shop and tested the trigger on several other pistols around the same price range including a SA 1911 range officer and they all feel better to me.
 

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...And I previously posted this.
Your videos exemplify why one would want a "trigger job".

Take up should be clean, and then break at the weight set. Then the slide cycles and when releasing the trigger it should reset with very little forward trigger movement.

LOG

So the cure is to either have a GS or some one in the know tune it.
Or
My suggestion is to first learn everything you can about the 1911's operation. Then after fully grasping its operation, the how and why proceed to learn how to tune it to your satisfaction. Then you will be in control.

LOG
 
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Wilson Combat EDC X9L, Kimber Custom II gfo
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
...And I previously posted this.
Your videos exemplify why one would want a "trigger job".

Take up should be clean, and then break at the weight set. Then the slide cycles and when releasing the trigger it should reset with very little forward trigger movement.

LOG

So the cure is to either have a GS or some one in the know tune it.
Or
My suggestion is to first learn everything you can about the 1911's operation. Then after fully grasping its operation, the how and why proceed to learn how to tune it to your satisfaction. Then you will be in control.

LOG
The main reason I posted it was to see how others Kimbers compared. I guess so I can better explain to Kimber if it is a warranty issue.
 

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Wilson Combat EDC X9L, Kimber Custom II gfo
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The whole reason I purchase a Kimber is because of the reputation I heard of. They are supposed to be better than the competition. If they are not, it would be nice to know. If I got one that has a defect, I would like them to make it right. If this is acceptable, then I will learn my lesson and never purchase from Kimber again.
 

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The whole reason I purchase a Kimber is because of the reputation I heard of. They are supposed to be better than the competition. If they are not, it would be nice to know. If I got one that has a defect, I would like them to make it right. If this is acceptable, then I will learn my lesson and never purchase from Kimber again.
Kimber is a production gun and not in the same class as the semi customs like Wilson and most certainly not like the full customs. What you are likely experiencing is a contrast between your Wilson and the Kimber. A better comparison is with a selection of other Kimbers, Colts, and Springfield Armory guns. I think you will find that it is pretty common for that kind of trigger action. Common, but not desireable to those with a discriminating trigger finger.
 

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If pulling the trigger fires the Kimber, and it cycles ready to be fired again, Kimber will do nothing. If you can convince them it feels terrible they may change parts, but if any of the parts has been touched they will force you to pay for new parts that are the same as the original parts. As Bill said Kimber is a production gun. I do agree it has potential and all of it original parts can be tuned to provide a good feeling trigger.

Do as you feel comfortable doing. Read, and understand.

LOG
 
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The whole reason I purchase a Kimber is because of the reputation I heard of. They are supposed to be better than the competition.
They just spend more for advertising. They make some pretty guns, but pretty does not equate to finely tuned.

At any rate, any smithy worth his shingle ought to be able to fix whats goin on. Trigger bow rubbin' on something is my guess, either the magazine, or its slot in the receiver. Could be something with the disconnector... but that wouldn't really effect reset, so I'll stick with rubbin' trigger.
 

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My smith has a $1000 minimum order. If you think I'm sending him a Kimber....

Do the trigger job yourself. Stone it nicely and bring back the sear spring a touch.

My well worn older 1911's all have triggers that improved with time. 10k rounds later, thay're all very nice.
 

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My smith has a $1000 minimum order. If you think I'm sending him a Kimber....

Do the trigger job yourself. Stone it nicely and bring back the sear spring a touch.

My well worn older 1911's all have triggers that improved with time. 10k rounds later, thay're all very nice.
$1,000 minimum??? Never seen such a thing, curious what smith that is


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

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Don't start messing with "do it youself" trigger jobs. I do think 500 rounds will start to smooth things out.

You could break down the gun and flitz the trigger bow and the the channel it travels in and then spray down the internals with a CLP so they are properly lubricated and keep firing it.

Or find a competent 1911 smith and pay for a trigger job.
 

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OP - Kimber Custom II is not a real custom 1911 at all . The "custom : is a name they use on there 5" models with different exterior finishes and features but there still the same inside and just a production 1911 with there lowest price that street prices sells for $ 850 today and will feel like many other lower priced models with in a line just like colt , ruger , remmington , kahr , springfield along with the majority of 1911 imports .

So as noted above - Find a quality gunsmith to give your kimber a tune up for around 80 dollars OR go shoot 500 rounds after a good disassembly , clean and lube job that a you tube video should be able to walk you thru .
 

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Kimber does not have "good" triggers out of the box. The 2 I have (not a large representation) had 6+ lb. triggers. Trigger job on both & they're shooting fine. You're not going to get a Nighthawk trigger on a production pistol. Get a trigger job (gunsmith or yourself) & enjoy the Kimber.
 

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Imho, a good trigger should have a nice smooth take-up followed by a smooth clean break at the lbs you want, as Logman says above. BUT most all production guns I have sampled are gritty feeling with a break in the 5-8lb range, mostly due to burrs n the parts that will improve with rounds fired.

Personally I would buy a Ed Brown or Harrison TRS sear stoning fixture and do it myself, that’s what I did, I like the smoother trigger break of the TRS fixture myself. But you need to be very careful stoning the sear & the hammer. A really good de-burring of the trigger bow, and all associated parts will yield good results, not Wilson Combat or other custom results but much better.

If your gunsmith is halfway competent and not a hack that $100 is a cheap investment though, by the time you buy fixtures, stones eccetera.

Kimber, I’ve got one 6” Kimber that really left me less than impressed because of the very poor tolerance stack ups. The barrel hood to slide fit was excellent as was the slude to frame fits (good bones) but the barrel bushing was horrible at best, the slide stop pin to link to barrel feet was also just horrible! The trigger wasn’t great either, very gritty along with the slide operation. But a good cleaning and deburring yielded good results. Accuracy was ok but not great, fittings new tighter barrel bushing along with a new tighter slide stop pin and link have give me a really accurate piece. I also fitted a new short smooth faced fully deburred trigger and used my TRS sear fixture to setup the sear and hammer to a nice, clean, smooth breaking 3.5lbs. Now it’s a nice gun !

Not to pick on Kimber because most new guns are like this and all I have looked at required tuning the extractor. Most have a gritty slide and trigger. I just fitted a new barrel bushing to my buddies Wilson Combat that had a horrible .009in clearance to the barrel and .004in to the slide, just horrible ! Now it has .0005in to the barrel and near line to line to the slide, you need a good bushing wrench to remove/install the bushing, the accuracy is noticeably better, just one big hole now. but the trigger is as nice as I have ever sampled and past the barrel bushing all the other fits are really good. My .02
 

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Kimber has a couple different lines of pistols. Their match grade guns like the Gold Match and Super Match (Still made?) will likely have better triggers than a utilitarian Custom II. Ask to try the triggers on fellow shooters’ guns to feel a good trigger. Once you feel a good trigger you will know a good trigger.
 

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One other thing I’ll add, there’s a lot of MIM bashing here and quite frankly good MIM is as good as just about anything,,, emphasis on “good” MIM. The one area that really lacks on a MIM part like a sear or hammer is they generally have higher wear than a good tool steel part and at some point will need replacing long before a tool steel part. After several thousand rounds I looked at the sear on my Kimber under a microscope and you could see some wear. I like the Wilson Bullet-proof or Harrison steel parts.
 
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