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I suppose to ask this question on behalf of my friend. Though I am a noob I have no idea about this. He is a gun enthusiast and knows some of the skills in gunsmithing, such as repairing guns. However, he also possesses expertise in filling firearms and some Welding and soldering techniques. My question is whether gunsmithing has a good career? What are the courses he needs to do, and what are the eligibility criteria. Well, after some research on the web, I was taken by some blogs where they mentioned gunsmithing has a bright future with an average package of about $39,935.

However, I need all your suggestions on this. Thanks for any inputs.
 

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There are way better people to answer this than I, but I have though about it a lot. I cannot for the life of me figure out the right business model, but I’ll throw out what I have considered. I think you need a 4-5 part business model that operates out of one building.

IME as a consumer, it seems like “indoor gun range” is one of the more profitable parts of the business. Seems like $60 per lane per hour is pretty common with rental, ammo, etc. This can be managed by a few trained staff and be foundational income. It will drive training, ammo, gun and Gunsmithing. So, the range is probably a must.

Gun Sales Counter.....I’m not sure if you need a full sales counter, but you probably do to turn rentals into buys. It would also give you a place to sell your gunsmithing. Having guns behind the counter that you built is important. It also allows you practice without any issues with customer gun.

Frankly, it would be nice to partner with a quality custom holster maker for that personal touch....maybe they keep you in inventory and come in on Saturdays to take custom orders.

It would be nice to develop a relationship with local LEO for service, sales, training space.

The think is this is a huge operation now just to make a little money.

The other option is building guns with more of a web interface to customers. Lots of folks do this. Many make incredible products, but struggle to eat. Just to be middle class, you would have to make $2000 plus per week. That is 1-2 guns per week shipped. This is for a process that looks like: order made....customer ships gun...1 week...tear down and order parts.....1 week(if in stock).....build gun.....1-2 days.....test...1 day.....metal prep.....1 day......send to finisher...1 day - 3 months.....Rebuild gun and final test/fit/fir .....1 day. So you have a variable 8-12 week process that you have to schedule and build efficiencies in to turn a gun out every 3 days. It can be done, but this is a pretty high level of organization.

I know an old guy that has like 100 rifles in his shop. Knows every one by name and features when you call him. He builds truly amazing rifles. I’ll bet he makes as much money from social security as he does from rifle building. He is truly top of the game in hunting rifle builders. That said, I don’t know how long a wood stock takes, but those are $2000 to $5000 worth of hand work! I bet his key to success is some amazing paperwork activity by his wife.
 

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Apprentice for other gunsmiths, attend armorers classes, then apply for work at a major firearms manufacturer, learn all the traits of the job at each build station. After all that, consider becoming an independent. Join gun forums, don’t represent yourself as an expert, until you are one. Then, be prepared to work most of your early career, just to break even.

Be sure to have a backup career. There’s allot of forces working against you, some of which is age, natural disasters (effects the supply chain) and the political climate. At the rate our country is going, Gunsmithing might be outlawed in the coming years.
 

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You're asking for a friend, right? :) Why are you asking instead of him? It appears you joined this Forum to ask this question. Your friend, that wants to be a gunsmith, should join a couple of the better gun forums. The would be a first step in the right direction. A way to learn about real world gun problems and solutions from knowledgeable people.

If your friend truly has a burning desire to become a gunsmith, I would not discourage him. Gunsmiths will always be needed, and good gunsmith's will always be in demand. You won't (can't) become a good gunsmith overnight, but with curiosity about how guns work, enough intelligence to learn, and integrity to deal honestly with your clients/customers you can achieve it.
 

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I suppose to ask this question on behalf of my friend. Though I am a noob I have no idea about this. He is a gun enthusiast and knows some of the skills in gunsmithing, such as repairing guns. However, he also possesses expertise in filling firearms and some Welding and soldering techniques. My question is whether gunsmithing has a good career? What are the courses he needs to do, and what are the eligibility criteria. Well, after some research on the web, I was taken by some blogs where they mentioned gunsmithing has a bright future with an average package of about $39,935.

However, I need all your suggestions on this. Thanks for any inputs.
Gunsmithing is a tough business to break into. If you want to work for someone else, you need to be a graduate of one of the community college courses (Lassen college, Colorado School of Trades, etc). STAY AWAY from the correspondence courses, they're VERY expensive for what they are and don't give you ANYWHERE NEAR the skills you'll need to work in an actual shop.

BTW, I'm a retired gunsmith.
 

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I have no experience with gunsmithing, except as a customer who values the work. From what I've seen, there seem to be two models:

(1) Big player in a niche market.
I'm thinking of someone like Cajun Gun Works, who has become the "go-to" smith in the CZ community. I sent my 97B to them. After a 3-month wait, they started the job at 9am and completed it by the end of the same day. The total bill was just shy of $1000 with maybe $150 in parts. That comes out to over $100/hr in labor alone. With the length of the wait list they have, they're probably pulling in that kind of cash 5 days/week. If you figure 240 working days per year (no weekends; 4 weeks annual vacation) that's a solid $190k in billing from labor alone. If you lost half that in expenses, you're still coming out with $95k in your pocket before taxes.

(2) Small-time general gunsmith. If you're a small player in a local market, you're not going to be able to charge $100/hr in labor. And even if you do, you probably won't be booked solid 8hrs/day for 5days/week. You'll need to find a way to attract customers, which means spending money on marketing. Even if it's just participating in local pistol competitions and handing out your card, you'll be spending your time to put your name out there.

Of course all this assumes you have space to work and the tools you need. Again, I'm not an expert, but I don't think it's trivial to build a machine shop for the kind of fiddly, high-precision work you'd need as a gunsmith.
 

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There certainly appears to be a lot of interest in this field. A guy that I know who actually is a pretty accomplished gunsmith (Military trained via the Marine corp). He recently sold his own business near me to go and teach a gunsmithing course at a university in North Carolina. A four year bachelors degree course as a matter of fact.

He told me that every time they offer the course it fills up overnight with applicants. I am guessing that it is pretty much as in any other skilled trade. You pay your dues and put your time in. And eventually if you are good enough, it will pay off for you. But as some have mentioned. In these uncertain times, it is hard to predict weather it will pay off in the long run or not.
 

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Maybe 15 years ago I needed some work done. I was recommended a home based smith who was a retired LEO. At the time he was 40 minutes away but as a LE myself I liked the former LE as a smith idea. Little did I know he was a REALLY good one. JC Blauvelt is his name. After the ultra left gun laws expanded in NY he up and left to PA. Still reachable for me at an hour and 15. I have used him for years and will continue too.

The model he has is IMHO a great way to go about it. He is retired LEO and has that pension. Works out of his home and his shop is not extensive but has all the tools he needs. Pretty low overhead and I can tell you he is flooded with work. Has to turn down plenty of jobs. I love that business plan! Certainly not for everyone.
 

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If you figure 240 working days per year (no weekends; 4 weeks annual vacation) that's a solid $190k in billing from labor alone. If you lost half that in expenses, you're still coming out with $95k in your pocket before taxes.
which would leave you near the poverty line in many locations....might do ok in flyover country.
 

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Forget about the skills needed.

The red tape & fees alone will take $100/hr down to $20/hr real fast.

Look into the insurance you'll need.

My view only (as I am sitting on a biz plan)

1) run a primary biz of gun range
2) provide gun smith'ing service (hire or become a smith)
3) no gun sales (difficult to run, difficult on profiting)

That said, still a bunch of red tape & fees in there.

Indoor ranges have a bunch of EPA associated with them.

Then you have to do some honest homework, how much can you honestly charge per lane per hour? How many hours will you be open daily, multiply that out x365, then assume you'll only capture about 10% of that # (you can adjust up/down depending on your market area). I use 10% for an honest 5-10yr forecast of the biz model, etc. There will be ups and downs, but on avg over that span, 10%.

Franchises are also something to look into, but they are not for me.

Becoming a smith for the 1st time, to make a living???? You think you can become an Olympic figure skater even though you went to ice skating class for 4yrs? Like the SEALS, only a few will make it, but all were good.

If you are not in it full time to make a living, then it's a hobby.
 

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Not gonna be a career in gun smithing from an extra bedroom in your house. Simply won't happen. Hobby yes, career no.
 

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Some years back I went that route. I applied for my FFL, but the town would not sign off on it because you have to have a actual business location. You can't work out of your house.
This was around the time ATF was getting rid of people with FFL's working out of their house. Those people were mostly doing it for their own collections and friends.
I actually ran the numbers and I was was just shy of being able to pay rent and make a profit.
I then did Gunsmithing for a local store working under their roof.
Now I do my own work and make alittle pocket money when a friend needs help.
Back in the late 80's when things were poping it was great. I was young, worked long hours, got little sleep.
There were customers that you did work for and when they got the gun back they were complaining about a problem that had nothing to do with the work that I had done.
I would take care of that issue usually at my expense just to keep the customer happy.
Would I do it again? Yes
I made some great friends and generally enjoyed tinking.
Would I do it to get rich? Nope
 

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There are gunsmiths, and then there are pistolsmiths. A "general" gunsmith should know a great deal about rifles, pistols, and shotguns. A pistolsmith should know a great deal about different types and models of pistols.....

Some suggestions have been to own a gun range......I would specifically suggest an outdoor gun range. However, it usually takes quite a bit of capital investment to own and indoor or outdoor gun range.

I have no idea how much money a gunsmith or pistolsmith may earn in a year, but I would say it depends on the gunsmith's quality of work, his reputation, and his ability to manage a business to satisfy his customers. If all of the above criteria are satisfactory, as his reputation grows, so will his income. Some of the top gunsmiths/pistolsmiths, have a long waiting list for work to get completed.
I started to learn about doing my own pistol work about 40 years ago, after waiting a year and a half for a custom gun build. I am now a DIY pistolsmith, and only build guns for myself.....and I never sell them. I like and build 1911 and STI 2011 pistols as my hobby. I still reload all of my ammo, and still participate in competitive shooting..... ;)
 

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Here's an old post I did about all this.
This is sort of a "Dutch Uncle" post......

I was a professional watchmaker and gunsmith. Here's some pointers:

Forget apprenticing.
Very few gunsmiths will take on an apprentice these days, and in order to have any value in the trade, the gunsmith who teaches you has to have a well known reputation in the industry as a gunsmith and as a teacher.
Since most gunsmiths have no real reputation outside of a few miles, a recommendation from them is often worthless when applying for a job.
It can take years to learn as an apprentice and in most cases not only won't you be paid, you'll have to pay the gunsmith for the training.

Forget the internet and mail order "schools". At the very best they can give you just enough knowledge to do hobby work on your OWN guns.
They cannot prepare you to do professional work on other peoples guns.
What they do best is take money from your wallet.
Apply for a job with a "diploma" or "certificate" from one of these places and you'll be lucky they don't laugh in your face as they pitch your resume in the trash.
People who hire gunsmiths MUST know the candidate is competent, isn't going to screw up a customers gun, and that usually means he has some experience in the trade.

You can't really learn a complicated, intricate trade by mail, internet, or video.
Look at it like this; if you owned a very expensive sports car you routinely drove at extremely high speeds, would you allow a mechanic to work on it who learned his trade on the internet or by mail?
When is the last time you heard of an aircraft mechanic having a video "degree"?

The way to learn the trade is in a top school.
You'll have a pro Master gunsmith/teacher looking at your work and telling you you're doing it right or wrong, and how to do it faster/better.
The schools with the best reputation in the industry for turning out top students are Colorado School of Trades and Trinidad Junior College.
Some of the other schools are also good.

As much as possible, get close to the teachers. There's a LOT more they can show you if they know you're interested and not the typical student who's just there.
A good school will also do you the favor of letting you know if you just aren't cut out for the trade.
Desire does not translate into actual skill and talent. I saw students in watchmaker's school that had a strong desire to learn or a store owner parent putting the pressure on to learn the skill who were total all-thumbs that were incapable of doing the job.

TAKE SOME BUSINESS CLASSES.
A great many people fail at trade businesses because they know nothing about running a business.
Remember, you will not be a gunsmith......you'll be a businessman who happens to run a gunsmithing business.
A large part of your day will be spent doing businessman functions like filling out paper work for the government, doing tax work, ordering parts and equipment, talking to prospective customers, being talked AT by dissatisfied customers, and spending only a limited amount of time actually doing gunsmithing.
Always remember, over 50% of all businesses fail, NO MATTER WHAT THEY ARE OR WHO'S RUNNING THEM. This is just normal business attrition. Not knowing about how to operate a business guarantees you'll fail.

The smart move is to work for another company or store that offers gunsmithing for a few years.
While you spend eight hours doing actual gun work and really learning the trade, the owner will do the businessman functions.
This will allow you really learn the trade, which the school will only get you started on. It will allow you to build up a reputation in the trade and build a prospective customer base.
You can take time to identify a good area to open your own shop, and you can buy the VERY expensive tools and equipment over a period of time.
It will also allow you to save enough money to tide you over the starvation period new trade shops go through.
In most cases, for at least the first year you'll spend a lot of time just sitting there waiting for some work to come in. Meantime, the bills keep coming in and you can get awfully hungry.
Too many new trade shops starve out from lack of income, before they can get an established customer inflow.

After you've learned how to do good gunsmithing FAST, bought the equipment, have a reputation in the trade, found a good place to open up, and have some customer base established, then you can take the risk of opening your own shop.
And it's ALWAYS a risk. Remember the more than 50% failure rate for all businesses.

As for salary, there's an old joke:
"How's a large pizza and a gunsmith alike....... Neither can feed a family of four".
The only gunsmiths who make much money are those like Bill Wilson who own big shops employing a number of gunsmiths.
When you take into account the hours spent doing businessman functions and actual gunsmithing the average self-employed gunsmith is lucky to be making minimum wage......This is NOT a joke.
The only gunsmiths who make good money and benefits are those who work for someone else, preferably in a big shop like a Wilson's.
A self-employed gunsmith has to be a person who can get personal satisfaction from the work, and can be content with not making a lot of money, not having the nice car, the nice house, the nice vacations, the nice Rolex, etc.

On the skills part of gunsmithing, you have to be one of those odd people who get satisfaction from constantly trying to do a job better, and always thinking you could have done a better job.
People who are the type who think "It's good enough" usually fail.
A lot of people want to be good watchmakers or gunsmiths, but not everyone has the talent. The school will, one way or another let you know if you're cut out for the trade or not.
This may be a blunt statement from an instructor, it may be hints that your work isn't up to standard, or it may be in bad grades.
Realizing you're not cut out for the trade depends on how well you listen to them and whether you're willing to admit it to yourself.
An amazing number of people in these technical schools simply refuse to accept it. In that case, your time and large amounts of money will be a total waste.

We NEED good gunsmiths, and the trade is a satisfying one on a personal level.
If you're serious, squeeze everything you can out of the school, take the business courses even if you have to do night school at a community college, and don't jump into opening your own shop until you're fully prepared.

About a year before you're due to graduate, start looking for a job. Most of the schools will help in job hunting, but it's largely up to you.
The day you graduate you should at least one FIRM job offer, and at least several strong possibilities.
The fools and boobs will wait for graduation to start looking.

There are a surprising number of sources for jobs beside gun shops. Many of the big custom shops like Wilson are often looking, Cabela's and other big retailers often need people, gun companies often are looking for GOOD people, some industries and companies you might not expect employ gunsmiths in research and government contract work.
Most police departments don't employ gunsmiths. They send cops to gun company armorers courses to be parts replacers.
Unless you're a cop, most won't accept an application, but a few do, so it can't hurt to check.
The government and military do employ gunsmiths but these are only very top, experienced people, and usually ex-military people.

Last fact........ MOST graduates of trade schools like watchmaking and gunsmithing are not in the trade within 5 years or less.
Either they never found a job, or they got tired of the low wages and left the trade.
In these trades you're either really good at it and are satisfied with a lower level life without the nice stuff, or you won't be in the trade very long.

Here's the American gunsmithing schools. Some, like Colorado School of Trades and Trinidad Junior College have better reputations than some others.

Colorado School of Trades
1575 Hoyt Street
Lakewood, CO 80215
Phone: 800-234-4594

Lassen Community College
P.O. Box 3000
Susanville, CA 96130
Phone: 530-257-4211

Modern Gun School
80 North Main Street, P.O. Box 846
St. Albans, VT 05478
Phone: 800-493-4114

Montgomery Community College
1011 Page Street
P.O. Box 787
Troy, NC 27371
Phone: 800-839-6222

Murray State College
One Murray Campus
Tishomingo, OK 73460
Phone: 580-371-2371

Pennsylvania Gunsmith School
812 Ohio River Blvd.
Avalon
Pittsburgh, PA 15202
Phone: 412-766-1812

Piedmont Community College
1715 College Drive
P.O. Box 1197
Roxboro, NC 27573
Phone: 336-599-1181

Pine Technical Institute
900 4th Street
Pine City, MN 55063
Phone: 800-521-7463

Trinidad State Jr. College
600 Prospect
Trinidad, CO 81082
Phone: 800-621-8752

Yavapai College
1100 East Sheldon Street
Prescott, AZ 86301
Phone: 520-776-2150
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Great post dfariswheel!

Reminds me of what happens in the chess world. Unless you are one of the very top level grandmasters, you will not make a living at tournament chess. The world does not reward expertise just because you deserve it. The way GMs make a living is by driving taxis, or any number of other unremarkable jobs. About 1% of them can make money on their rep, selling books teaching others how to play, or engaging in simuls where they play e.g. 40 people at a time, or some other activity. Never heard of a rich GM, living the international-playboy lifestyle.

I am also reminded of those real estate guys who get rich teaching courses to large audiences in how to succeed in real estate.....
 

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Clearly I am not a gunsmith. I have that all figured out. No one, I mean no one, is standing in line for one of my pistols. I do have tremendous respect for the masters. The elegance of their work is really really something. Any of the pistols done by the masters seem relatively inexpensive compared to the quality that is internal to the finished product.

It seems to me that a prerequisite would be great hand eye coordination, deft use of all hand tools, and an ability to walk into a machine shop and use all machines proficiently. TIG, MIG, gas welding, lathe, mill, drill press, measuring, gauging etc. Reading prints. Heat treating. Finishing. Materials science.

And have an intuitive sense of what should or shouldn’t work. It seems that it is a calling. There have to be easier ways to make a living. It appears to me that there is a wide gulf between ok pistol smiths and the masters.
 

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Here's an old post I did about all this.
This is sort of a "Dutch Uncle" post......

I was a professional watchmaker and gunsmith. Here's some pointers:

Forget apprenticing.
Very few gunsmiths will take on an apprentice these days, and in order to have any value in the trade, the gunsmith who teaches you has to have a well known reputation in the industry as a gunsmith and as a teacher.
Since most gunsmiths have no real reputation outside of a few miles, a recommendation from them is often worthless when applying for a job.
It can take years to learn as an apprentice and in most cases not only won't you be paid, you'll have to pay the gunsmith for the training.

Forget the internet and mail order "schools". At the very best they can give you just enough knowledge to do hobby work on your OWN guns.
They cannot prepare you to do professional work on other peoples guns.
What they do best is take money from your wallet.
Apply for a job with a "diploma" or "certificate" from one of these places and you'll be lucky they don't laugh in your face as they pitch your resume in the trash.
People who hire gunsmiths MUST know the candidate is competent, isn't going to screw up a customers gun, and that usually means he has some experience in the trade.

You can't really learn a complicated, intricate trade by mail, internet, or video.
Look at it like this; if you owned a very expensive sports car you routinely drove at extremely high speeds, would you allow a mechanic to work on it who learned his trade on the internet or by mail?
When is the last time you heard of an aircraft mechanic having a video "degree"?

The way to learn the trade is in a top school.
You'll have a pro Master gunsmith/teacher looking at your work and telling you you're doing it right or wrong, and how to do it faster/better.
The schools with the best reputation in the industry for turning out top students are Colorado School of Trades and Trinidad Junior College.
Some of the other schools are also good.

As much as possible, get close to the teachers. There's a LOT more they can show you if they know you're interested and not the typical student who's just there.
A good school will also do you the favor of letting you know if you just aren't cut out for the trade.
Desire does not translate into actual skill and talent. I saw students in watchmaker's school that had a strong desire to learn or a store owner parent putting the pressure on to learn the skill who were total all-thumbs that were incapable of doing the job.

TAKE SOME BUSINESS CLASSES.
A great many people fail at trade businesses because they know nothing about running a business.
Remember, you will not be a gunsmith......you'll be a businessman who happens to run a gunsmithing business.
A large part of your day will be spent doing businessman functions like filling out paper work for the government, doing tax work, ordering parts and equipment, talking to prospective customers, being talked AT by dissatisfied customers, and spending only a limited amount of time actually doing gunsmithing.
Always remember, over 50% of all businesses fail, NO MATTER WHAT THEY ARE OR WHO'S RUNNING THEM. This is just normal business attrition. Not knowing about how to operate a business guarantees you'll fail.

The smart move is to work for another company or store that offers gunsmithing for a few years.
While you spend eight hours doing actual gun work and really learning the trade, the owner will do the businessman functions.
This will allow you really learn the trade, which the school will only get you started on. It will allow you to build up a reputation in the trade and build a prospective customer base.
You can take time to identify a good area to open your own shop, and you can buy the VERY expensive tools and equipment over a period of time.
It will also allow you to save enough money to tide you over the starvation period new trade shops go through.
In most cases, for at least the first year you'll spend a lot of time just sitting there waiting for some work to come in. Meantime, the bills keep coming in and you can get awfully hungry.
Too many new trade shops starve out from lack of income, before they can get an established customer inflow.

After you've learned how to do good gunsmithing FAST, bought the equipment, have a reputation in the trade, found a good place to open up, and have some customer base established, then you can take the risk of opening your own shop.
And it's ALWAYS a risk. Remember the more than 50% failure rate for all businesses.

As for salary, there's an old joke:
"How's a large pizza and a gunsmith alike....... Neither can feed a family of four".
The only gunsmiths who make much money are those like Bill Wilson who own big shops employing a number of gunsmiths.
When you take into account the hours spent doing businessman functions and actual gunsmithing the average self-employed gunsmith is lucky to be making minimum wage......This is NOT a joke.
The only gunsmiths who make good money and benefits are those who work for someone else, preferably in a big shop like a Wilson's.
A self-employed gunsmith has to be a person who can get personal satisfaction from the work, and can be content with not making a lot of money, not having the nice car, the nice house, the nice vacations, the nice Rolex, etc.

On the skills part of gunsmithing, you have to be one of those odd people who get satisfaction from constantly trying to do a job better, and always thinking you could have done a better job.
People who are the type who think "It's good enough" usually fail.
A lot of people want to be good watchmakers or gunsmiths, but not everyone has the talent. The school will, one way or another let you know if you're cut out for the trade or not.
This may be a blunt statement from an instructor, it may be hints that your work isn't up to standard, or it may be in bad grades.
Realizing you're not cut out for the trade depends on how well you listen to them and whether you're willing to admit it to yourself.
An amazing number of people in these technical schools simply refuse to accept it. In that case, your time and large amounts of money will be a total waste.

We NEED good gunsmiths, and the trade is a satisfying one on a personal level.
If you're serious, squeeze everything you can out of the school, take the business courses even if you have to do night school at a community college, and don't jump into opening your own shop until you're fully prepared.

About a year before you're due to graduate, start looking for a job. Most of the schools will help in job hunting, but it's largely up to you.
The day you graduate you should at least one FIRM job offer, and at least several strong possibilities.
The fools and boobs will wait for graduation to start looking.

There are a surprising number of sources for jobs beside gun shops. Many of the big custom shops like Wilson are often looking, Cabela's and other big retailers often need people, gun companies often are looking for GOOD people, some industries and companies you might not expect employ gunsmiths in research and government contract work.
Most police departments don't employ gunsmiths. They send cops to gun company armorers courses to be parts replacers.
Unless you're a cop, most won't accept an application, but a few do, so it can't hurt to check.
The government and military do employ gunsmiths but these are only very top, experienced people, and usually ex-military people.

Last fact........ MOST graduates of trade schools like watchmaking and gunsmithing are not in the trade within 5 years or less.
Either they never found a job, or they got tired of the low wages and left the trade.
In these trades you're either really good at it and are satisfied with a lower level life without the nice stuff, or you won't be in the trade very long.

Here's the American gunsmithing schools. Some, like Colorado School of Trades and Trinidad Junior College have better reputations than some others.

Colorado School of Trades
1575 Hoyt Street
Lakewood, CO 80215
Phone: 800-234-4594

Lassen Community College
P.O. Box 3000
Susanville, CA 96130
Phone: 530-257-4211

Modern Gun School
80 North Main Street, P.O. Box 846
St. Albans, VT 05478
Phone: 800-493-4114

Montgomery Community College
1011 Page Street
P.O. Box 787
Troy, NC 27371
Phone: 800-839-6222

Murray State College
One Murray Campus
Tishomingo, OK 73460
Phone: 580-371-2371

Pennsylvania Gunsmith School
812 Ohio River Blvd.
Avalon
Pittsburgh, PA 15202
Phone: 412-766-1812

Piedmont Community College
1715 College Drive
P.O. Box 1197
Roxboro, NC 27573
Phone: 336-599-1181

Pine Technical Institute
900 4th Street
Pine City, MN 55063
Phone: 800-521-7463

Trinidad State Jr. College
600 Prospect
Trinidad, CO 81082
Phone: 800-621-8752

Yavapai College
1100 East Sheldon Street
Prescott, AZ 86301
Phone: 520-776-2150
Dfariswheel is online now Report Post
This is an excellent post and mirrors my experience.

I graduated from Trinidad State Junior college 10 years ago and I've been a full time gunsmith at an indoor range since then. I had 17 classmates when I started school, we graduated 15 and now there's only 2 of us left in the trade.

Gunsmithing is neither profitable or easy. It's the rare gunsmith that takes home 50k+ a year.

--
Pat Jones
Firestone CO
 
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