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I am practicing my reloads with my new lightweight Kimber CDP. I notice that this 1911 thing is a little different than my Glock


Namely, with the Glock I always practiced slingshot, as even Glock says that their slide lock is NOT a slide release and their gun is meant to be slingshotted.

I notice that the slingshot technique is not as reliable with my Kimber. Probably due to the recoil buffer I have in there, but the slide stop does not always release when I slingshot it.
I think that maybe the slide release is a better way to go with the 1911. The Glock has a spring which pulls the slide lock out of the way when you slingshot the slide. The 1911 does not have that feature and depends on the slide coming back and pushing the slide lock out of the way, which seems less reliable. In my trials it seems that thumbing the slide release is better, but I am willing to be proven wrong as I am here to learn.

My specific question is this: If I use my shooting hand thumb to release the slide, I have to reach a lot to hit that lever (even with my big paws) and the gun ends up angling to the left as I reach with my thumb.
It seems faster and better to use my support hand thumb when I have the option of two hands.

I am going to be practicing a lot so whatever technique I decide to go with will become rote.

I will be going to Gunsite in two weeks so I will learn more there, but I would like to get a head start in practicing so that I am a little smoother when I get there.



So, what do you all think? What are the most prescribed modern methods for reliably releasing the slide under combat stress?


ps- I am looking for self defense here, not gamesmanship.
 

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Originally posted by thaddeus:

It seems faster and better to use my support hand thumb when I have the option of two hands.

Thaddeus, you have answered your own question. This is indeed the proper way to drop the slide from lock on a 1911.

Some trainers will tell you to slingshot all slides, but this is simply a generic answer for folks who use/own more than one type of gun. The slingshot method works for all semi-auto's. It is considered a gross motor skill that is better to be maintained and used when "muscle-memory" takes over under stress.

I train anyone (and have been trained) that if they use the 1911 specifically for carry, the correct method is using the slide stop. When you seat a new mag after slide lock, your support hand thumb is in perfect position to drop the slide with the slide stop. Why would you want to take that same hand (which is now almost in a good two hand hold anyway if you have finished seating the mag) and bring it back over the gun to drop the slide by slingshotting? Wasted time and movement, which could be better served by getting a firm two-hand grip and begin firing.
 

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One way to make the controls a little easier to access with with thin grips. I find that I can reach all the controls without very small or no change in grip.

The change of grips is just a mechanical adaptation to facilitate accessing the controls.
 

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Yeah, I'm liking the support hand thumb too. It's fast, my hand is into a solid two hand firing position, etc...very natural and positive for me. I used to always use the slide release on my Glock and never had any problems with this. However, I am having problems with my Springfield jamming on the first round of the mag after slide lock. But only after a hundred rounds or so, so not even a "real world" issue. Stay safe.
 
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