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Discussion Starter #1
So, I had what appeared to be a disconnector problem, specifically that I hadn't milled the lower lug back far enough to allow the disco to clear the slot. it turned out to not be the problem, or at least milling the barrel didn't cure it. If I had stopped and thunk about it, I would have just taken out the recoil spring and felt where the disconnector was making contact. With the slide forward, I guide the hammer down. Keeping the trigger pulled, I retract the slide over the hammer. I then pull on the hammer, and it goes "click" as it goes to full cock. The slide is failing to bring it to full cock. As I said earlier, the rails were cut well within spec, and there is no daylight between the edges of the frame top and the top of the slide's grooves, so I know I didn't screw this up. On closer observation, comparing this slide with a USGI one, it looks like the part of the slide that contacts the disco has been improperly cut! In these pictures, you can see all sorts of daylight between this surface and the top of the frame. My rails are better than they look in these puictures, for some reason. So, where am I at, and what can I do?
 

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Yikes.......what a trial by fire!

Measure the location of the hammer and sear pin holes per GI blueprints.
The gap between top of frame and the disco rail does not look very excessive.

What was the source of the slide?
 

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The gap does not look to be bad enough to cause a problem. You state with the slide retracted, you need to retract the hammer rearward to get it cocked. Could it be the hammer is the culprit? The striking face may be too short or perhaps the hammer lugs are out of place. I'd try the hammer in a different frame. Try a different hammer in troubled pistol and also try a different slide. Shouldn't be too difficult to narrow down the source of the issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yikes.......what a trial by fire!

Measure the location of the hammer and sear pin holes per GI blueprints.
The gap between top of frame and the disco rail does not look very excessive.

What was the source of the slide?
I just re-measured the hammer pin hole. I literally feel sick to my stomach. I measured again and again and again, using gauge pins and caliper. Rather than the .016 above the level of the slide stop pin, the hammer pin is dead-even with it! I drilled these holes using one of those stupid jigs, having no better way at the time of securely clamping the frame. Here's the thing, though; this jig very rigidly grabs the frame by the slide stop and mag release holes, and the last frame I did in this has the hammer hole .024 above the SS pin. It's not the frame rails, either. When I cut them, I used a Starret dial test indicator to get the frame top level, and the rail thickness is absolutely consistent.The drilling bushings aren't shot, either; they're still at a hair over .157". The only thing I can think of is that there may be some inconsistency in the location of the mag release hole. God, this is sickening! So, my hammer hole is .016" too low. This was a LOT of work! Not to mention, the tension between my wife and I with the amount of time I've spent on this.
 

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Might be possible to fabricate a plug or a bushing and
relocate the hammer pin hole.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Might be possible to fabricate a plug or a bushing and
relocate the hammer pin hole.
I'm sorry, I don't mean to be obtuse, but I'm just not experienced enough to know how to do this. I'm going to take a guess, though. would you essentially press-fit something in the holes, then re-drill them? Sorry that I'm harassing you guys. It's just that I've put so much into this. Now I've got exactly 1 week left till school resumes, and I've put so much time into this that I could have spent with my family. I'm literally heartsick. Not to mention the money. I have to try to salvage this.Any help would be greatly appreciated. I know you probably don't encounter problems like this, because this is a mistake you're unlikely to make, but any guess as to how you might approach this?
 

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Why not Loctite in a threaded plug, machine to surface and drill.

LOG
 

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I don't know what tools you have at your disposal.

I would center a 3/16" end mill over the proper location and
plunge bore a hole.
Then turn a steel bushing on the lathe to provide a .001"
press fit and install with Loc-Tite #271.

Of course, you would need to do this twice. Once on each side.
And support the frame internally when pressing in the bushings.

Check location of ALL the holes before doing this.
 

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Joe
Many posts back, you stated you were a certified machinist.. Forget that it's a gun, and go back to the basics of machine shop 101..Find and establish the centerlines and work from them accordingly..
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Woo hoo !! I can do this ! I do have a 3/16" end mill. In fact, I have a mill ground down to .362, and a 72" long piece of 3/16 4140 rod from back when I trashed the first frame's VIS, and was going to do a dikeman's repair. I just need to figure out a good way to fixture the frame up for the operation. To be honest, I don't even have a basic clamping setup (I know, I know), having bought the mill with a mill vise, then using the stupid jig. By the way, the mag release button is 1.083 down from the SS, not 1.095. I measured and re-measured, using gauge pins. All repeatable within a thou. I suspected that the mag release being too high was the source of the problem (see above post), meaning I'm somewhat smarter than a potato. This sticks in my craw. All this work. If I didn't have your guidance, and the means to fix this, I'd be screwed! I'd have to cut the frame up, send it to him, and hope he's honest enough to say "my bad. Here's a new frame. Sorry about all those hours you'll never get back. How magnanimous of me."
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Joe
Many posts back, you stated you were a certified machinist.. Forget that it's and gun, and go back to the basics of machine shop 101..Find and establish the centerlines and work from them accordingly..
I am. I got the certification from the local community college about 4 years ago. This is just a hobby. I'm a med student, and medicine is an ENORMOUS time and mental resource hog. Nonetheless, I'm a 4.0 student, in medical school.I'm sure if I did this full-time, for a living, and had state-of-the-art equipment, I'd be much better at it. Maybe I shouldn't have misrepresented my ability or skill level, if that's what I did. Maybe I myself overestimated my skill level. It wouldn't be the first time. God, I just want to put this behind me at this point. I appreciate you guys' patience.
 

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All you need is a flat plate with some 1/4-20 tapped holes.
Frame laying flat on the plate, plate held in the mill vise.
You can quickly make a couple of bar style clamps.

True up the rails on the 'x' axis. Tighten clamps.
Use an indicator in the spindle to find centerline of the
slide stop hole.
Zero 'x' and 'y'.

Then move to locations specified on the blueprints
and check hole locations using the spindle mounted
indicator.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
All you need is a flat plate with some 1/4-20 tapped holes.
Frame laying flat on the plate, plate held in the mill vise.
You can quickly make a couple of bar style clamps.

True up the rails on the 'x' axis. Tighten clamps.
Use an indicator in the spindle to find centerline of the
slide stop hole.
Zero 'x' and 'y'.

Then move to locations specified on the blueprints
and check hole locations using the spindle mounted
indicator.
That is about as complete and perfect an explanation of how to go about this as I could hope for, thanks! I really appreciate it! I think I just found a good way to re-purpose the jig. Kind of goofy for me to have certification and machines, and be using machinists' training wheels (the jig). I probably deserve this outcome for doing that. God's also probably punishing me a little for having screwed-up priorities, too.:bawling:
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Joe
Many posts back, you stated you were a certified machinist.. Forget that it's and gun, and go back to the basics of machine shop 101..Find and establish the centerlines and work from them accordingly..
God, I barely remember saying this. Seems like years ago. I think this seemingly Herculean project has torn a hole in my perception of time. I'm just about there, guys; I promise!:)
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Somehow, I get a sneaking suspicion, when your done, you will have... Dare I say it.... An Auto Ord....everything all over the map....but working. You should meet ChrisATX. ��


CW
Ha! And to me, it will be the most precious piece of crap on God's green Earth! Until it breaks. Then,I will cry. Like a newborn infant.:rofl:Without shame.
 
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