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Discussion Starter #1
Somehow no powder was dropped into a case. I know that ultimately it is my fault for expecting rather than inspecting, but I either missed the powder dropping step, or the Lee auto disk missed a charge.
Anyway, what is the best way to remove the bullet? I thought about getting a dowel rod and pushing it in the direction of travel as not to reverse the bullet against the rifling. This sound good?

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Either a wooden of brass rod and a couple hammer blows will dislodge it. If it is a cast bullet, it will come out easy. If it is a jacketed, you may have to smack it pretty good.

Been there.
 

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I wouldn't worry about pushing it out backwards.

I have found that a long socket wrench extension works great for removing stuck bullets. Ust the 3/8 for .45 and the 1/4 for 38/9. Corners are all rounded and fills the barrel quite well so no worry about slipping. Slide it in and hit it good with a hammer and the bullet will come out.
 

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Do not use a socket extension or any other steel tool inside the barrel. Wooden dowels or brass are fine as neither will harm the rifling. They are of a softer material than steel. Socket extensions are steel, hence can do some nasty damage to the rifling. Of course, if you don't make any mistakes, then feel free to use steel tools inside your barrel. Otherwise, don't risk it.
 

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DNS makes a good point about steel tools.

The socket extension is suitable so long as all edges are rounded and smooth (use a tool that hasn't been abused). SOcket extensions are usually quite readily available, will not break or stick like wood, wont deform like brass, and won't damage your rifling so long as you use the appropriate size in the barrel. Since they are steel, it will take only one or two taps instead of several more with brass and wood as the steel doesn't deform and/or absorb the energy. If the steel on steel concerns you, wrap it in a layer of electrical tape although this is quite unnecessary.
 

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I keep a foot-long piece of fiberglass arrow in the gun case, along with a spare recoil spring and a pair of foam earplugs. That way, I know I'll have it handy if I need it.

I also keep a plastic mallet in my range box, but can use a rock to drive the arrow shaft, if necessary.

A few sharp blows and the barrel is clear with no damage.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
OK, I'll see what I can do.

Thanks guys
 

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This (squib round) has happened to me 3 times in the last 18 months all with comercial ammo. The last 2 times in one week were with CCI Blazer .45 230 FMJ and my 625 S&W. The first was with PMC 230 FMJ in my USGI government model. It is not just handloads. No more CCI for me.

Everyone needs to be alert to this possibility all the time. At this rate I might be better loading my own!

Dean
 

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dear feedramp, I concider myself well prepared, however you need to do something diferent if you have that many problems with your firearms. use a wood or nylon punch. Fiberglass WILL shader into many pieces. Everything is fun and games untill someone looses an eye.
Daniel


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Once I had one stuck so tight I had to use a long screwdiver tapped by a hammer. Try the wooden dowel first. You are lucky to did not fire another one behind it!
 

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you can add a little lube like tapmagic/liquid wrench or wd40 on the side that will have the bullet pushed out - lube helps the process a lot
 

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Originally posted by Danomite 45:
dear feedramp, I concider myself well prepared, however you need to do something diferent if you have that many problems with your firearms. use a wood or nylon punch. Fiberglass WILL shader into many pieces. Everything is fun and games untill someone looses an eye.
Daniel


Who said that I had "that many problems with[my] firearms?" I didn't. In fact, if you read my post again, you will not see any such statement. I didn't say that I had _any_ problems with any of my firearms, much less "many." I sugest you read my post again.

Regarding my use of a fiberglass arrow shaft: I have used it for various jobs in which it was used as a "soft" drift, and have not experienced the "shader" you described. If I had, I would have mentioned it in my original post, or would not have posted at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Originally posted by Chico:
Once I had one stuck so tight I had to use a long screwdiver tapped by a hammer. Try the wooden dowel first. You are lucky to did not fire another one behind it!
If there is not enough power for the bullet to exit the barrel, then there won't be enough power for it to cycle. But it did happen on the very last round shot that day!
 

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this is a damn poor time to get a bullet stuck in a barrel!!!!! mcole
 

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When you realized your gun was no longer functional, did you do the "Hollywood" drill and throw it downrange at the target?


Sorry to hear about the malfunction, but glad to know it's no worse than one stuck in the barrel.


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I've never had a squib happen to me *yet*. I'm glad you guys are alright. What do you look for when this happens?? How do you know to stop shooting? I'm very nervous about this after reading these posts.

tim
 

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Tim C.:

What alerts you to a squib is what is called a "pop and no kick". The hammer drops, the gun seemingly does not fire--or may fire weakly. If this is the case, and it happens to you, don't get too upset--just clear it as follows.

First and foremost, SAFETY---KEEP THE WEAPON POINTED DOWNRANGE AND AT THE TARGET FOR AT LEAST ONE FULL MINUTE. This gives hangfires a chance to go off. One time, I believe that some bullet lube found its way between charge and primer, in my .44 Mag. Dropped the hammer, no shot. Kept the handgun pointed downrange, and heard a sizzling sound, coming from the gun (!). After about 10 seconds, the round discharged with full power and velocity!!

Next, after a full minute has passed, CLEAR THE WEAPON. No shortcuts. Remove the magazine in semis, carefully open the cylinder in revolvers.

In semi autos, CAREFULLY draw back the slide, and observe the ejection port. Eject the round onto a soft surface. Did a complete round eject? Check the primer for an indent. Just the case? (maybe with some powder granules?) BE CAREFUL. YOU MIGHT HAVE A BULLET STUCK.

In revolvers, carefully open the cylinder. If it doesn't open, check the barrel/cylinder gap--the bullet might be stuck there. If so, take a dowel and push the bullet back into the case. No bullet?

IT MIGHT BE IN YOUR BORE.

DO NOT FIRE THE GUN AGAIN, OR EVEN LOAD IT, UNTIL YOU CAN TAKE A CLEANING ROD, WITH PATCH, AND PUSH IT ALL THE WAY THROUGH THE BORE. Don't even trust your eyes with this one. Putting a patch through will tell you if there are any obstructions in the bore. Use a tight fitting patch, too.

Final note: Most squibs in revolvers can be blamed on using slow-burning powders in small quantities. H110 and W296 are notorious for this. Follow the manufacturer's recommendations explicitly. In semi autos, usually the problem is low powder level, or even no powder.

It is'nt hard to clear a squib; just keep your head on, and you'll be OK.

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Discussion Starter #19
No, no "Hollywod" antics. I may not be a professional reloader, but I am a profesional in other disciplines![
]

POWDERMAN, you provided some stellar advice on the squib procedure. I just said "damn" and then racked out the casing without thought.

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: You will know when you get a squib. If your wearing hearing protection, you will hear a very small "piff" and will feel the hammer drop. Hopefully it is a squib without enough power to cycle the slide.

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Originally posted by Tim C:


(snipped for brevity)

How do you know to stop shooting? I'm very nervous about this after reading these posts.

tim
The only reliable way I know is to assume that there is a problem that is severe enough to warrant following the procedure outlined by Powderman. If the bore is blocked, then it was worthwhile.

If it turns out that, after inspection, the bore is clear, then you are merely embarrassed.

I'd rather be embarrassed any day to return later, than to be careless or stupid and not return at all.


[This message has been edited by feedramp (edited 09-21-2001).]
 
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