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I found a use for old brass key blanks and keys.

If you dig long enough, you will find some brass that is flat/rectangular and you will have feeler gauges for the extractor to breech face distance.

You may look a bit odd in some old time lock shop going through key blanks with calipers. I like flat gauges instead of round for that purpose.

I had thought about buying a few feeler gauges. They don’t go up to the dimensions required but leaves could be super glued together as stacks. (Once the rivet was out).

I measured a few keys and was done.
Yep. Another source of shims is old burnt out or otherwise no longer useful AC adapters - chargers. Years, ago, I had a Mighty Mule gate charger/AC adapter fail so I took it apart to see why. Apparently lightning got it. I did notice that the "E" and "I" core leaves were easy to separate. To my astonishment, they were exactly .020" thick! They make great sacrificial shims! You can easily get a hundred from one transformer - plus you can sell the copper wire! Most people just throw them away.
 
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About to jump down this rabbit hole, doing a bunch of reading, and gathering parts, absolutely agree a kit would be great, or even a simple bullet list of “Pual’s “ …lol
recommended tools, what is used to size the recommended stock used for homemade defection gage. Pin gages recommended?
Or even pre made with the bend in place ?
the recommended tension tool, and the not recommended ones?

it’s a lot of information, not all of it is in one spot, I would pay a premium for in the know kit. But at this point have most of it.
Still need pin gages.

I also think the “kit” should-be approved by “Pual” and called Pual’s extractor kit.

the Steve kit just doesn’t have the same ring to it….

but I could be wrong.
 

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ChipSS said:
. . . what is used to size the recommended stock used for homemade defection gauge.
I used files, a dial caliper, and a lot of patience. Dial calipers will get you close but micrometers are much more accurate. Files are about the same in terms of accuracy. Machine tools are where it's at for producing dead-solid 90 degree angles and parallel sides.

Pin gages recommended?
I'm pretty sure there are a couple of pictures in the sticky that would answer your question. However, a better hook-to-breechface tool would be made from flat stock. The pin gauges I use tend to dip into the extractor hole which will result in a false reading. I avoid that by going slowly and closely observing the pin as I pull it down behind the hook.

the recommended tension tool, and the not recommended ones?
I have found no use for a tension measuring tool. If the deflection is set to no more than .010", it's very hard to bend the extractor so much that feeding is compromised.

I also think the “kit” should-be approved by “Pual” and called Pual’s extractor kit.
I hope that's a joke. There are folks here who know a lot more about fitting extractors than I know.
 

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"There are folks here who know a lot more about fitting extractors than I know."

Steve,

If that is true, I wish they would speak up! I am always eager to learn more.

Sent from my SM-G930R4 using Tapatalk
 

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Am I doing it wrong? I just hold the extractor half way out of the channel and bend it by feel.
That works fine for setting tension but my caution is that setting tension without first setting deflection is a hit or miss proposition in terms of reliable functioning.

I've fixed several pistols exhibiting intermittent failures-to-feed by correcting excessive extractor deflection. The only way to fix excessive deflection is to carefully file down the tensioning wall. This is not nearly as easy to do as filing the fitting pad at the beginning of the fitting process.
 
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