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Discussion Starter · #1 ·



A friend has some of these bullets that are pretty interesting looking. They are .308 hollow points. The silver band is some type of plating that reveals copper underneath when scraped with a file. Pretty sure that they were pulled bullets from looking at them so they may have been factory, or maybe some type of old military round? Has anyone seen these before? I'm curious as to what purpose the band serves and what these may have been intended for.
 

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A friend has some of these bullets that are pretty interesting looking. They are .308 hollow points. The silver band is some type of plating that reveals copper underneath when scraped with a file. Pretty sure that they were pulled bullets from looking at them so they may have been factory, or maybe some type of old military round? Has anyone seen these before? I'm curious as to what purpose the band serves and what these may have been intended for.



Not a clue......., but I know I don't want to get hit by that thing. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Not a clue......., but I know I don't want to get hit by that thing. ;)
I don't want hit by ANY of them. This thing is nasty though. I couldn't tell if the band is all part of the jacket or if it is added on to it. Either way it definitely had to be one heck of a process to make these.
 

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Looks to be a design for deep penetration and controlled expansion. Double cannelure for jacket bonding. Interesting
 

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There's a lot of machine work on that bullet. I'm guessing that it is designed to function something like the Norma Kalahari bullet-the forward third of the bullet breaking up into some number of petals and the rest continuing to penetrate or exiting-but they are all boat tails as far as I can tell-perhaps a predecessor? The Norma Vulkan has the jacket rolled over into the core's hp and some had a double cannelure-one for crimp and one for core retention.

Neither have that kind of plating though, nor the extra machine work near the tip and ahead of the first cannelure...

Can you tell if the jacket material is rolled over into the hollowpoint section?
 

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They are Vampire Killers. The silver band is pure silver plating. Not an effective Vampire stopper, unfortunately. There is not enough silver to effectively stop a Vampire with a single shot (nor a Werewolf for that matter). Although, they do tell me that it hurts like hell ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
There's a lot of machine work on that bullet. I'm guessing that it is designed to function something like the Norma Kalahari bullet-the forward third of the bullet breaking up into some number of petals and the rest continuing to penetrate or exiting-but they are all boat tails as far as I can tell-perhaps a predecessor? The Norma Vulkan has the jacket rolled over into the core's hp and some had a double cannelure-one for crimp and one for core retention.

Neither have that kind of plating though, nor the extra machine work near the tip and ahead of the first cannelure...

Can you tell if the jacket material is rolled over into the hollowpoint section?


It doesn't appear to be rolled inside. The mark between the silver band and top cannelure appears to be a pull mark as it is different on each bullet. I have this posted a few different places and everyone is stumped.
 

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Be sure to satisfy our curiosity if you do get a definitive answer.

Bob
 

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it was a hunting bullet made by Western Tool & Copper Works. there was a name for it but I don't remember what it is right now. I believe Elmer was a big user of it. I had to go back into my Phil Sharp handloading book to find the name of the company. it was a controlled expansion bullet and was in the timeframe before the Nosler Partition.
 

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Steven O isn't stumped! You da man, bro!

Is that 1930's or 1950's? Really cool to see developmental technology.

USMMguy is right about the cannelures, both are for core retention.
(That's the whole idea behind Remington CoreLokt and others.)
The nickel jacket probably controls the upper half while the
twin cannelures control the bottom half.

Cool!
 

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I have to say that's the coolest thing I've saw in a long time.
How many do you have & what are you planning to do with them?
And the weight?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
They aren't mine, they belong to a friend. Not sure exactly how many he has. I only saw a what he brought to show me, but he said he bought a bag of them. I can ask how many and what he is going to do with them tomorrow as I'd like to have a few myself, just for conversation pieces.
Not sure on the weight, but they're heavy
 

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I have seen some 30-30 & 30-06 factory ammo loaded with these bullets. certainly if you find any loaded ammo with these bullets there is some collector value to them and possibly even the bullets by themselves.
 

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I did some more looking on this bullet. it is a "Peters Belted Bullet" and not something made by Western Tool & Copper Works. looking in Phil Sharp's hand loading book some more I found a picture of it in the bullet development section. the only difference is that the bullet in the book only shows one cannelure instead of two like if shown in the opening thread. the number of cannelures could have identified the bullet for a specific power level but that is a guess. there were a couple of pictures of Western Tool bullets in the book and nothing like it.

Phil Sharpe's book has a lot of stuff in it so if you ever find a copy of it you should buy it. I paid $50 for mine several years ago
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
I did some more looking on this bullet. it is a "Peters Belted Bullet" and not something made by Western Tool & Copper Works. looking in Phil Sharp's hand loading book some more I found a picture of it in the bullet development section. the only difference is that the bullet in the book only shows one cannelure instead of two like if shown in the opening thread. the number of cannelures could have identified the bullet for a specific power level but that is a guess. there were a couple of pictures of Western Tool bullets in the book and nothing like it.

Phil Sharpe's book has a lot of stuff in it so if you ever find a couple of it you should buy it. I paid $50 for mine several years ago
That's them! Thanks for all the effort. It still looks like these may be quite old then. Definitely not something you see very often.

Sending you a pm.

For the guys that asked the weight - 225gr
 

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If I'm not mistaken Remington bought out Peter's sometime before 1965...I've got some old Peter's ammo boxes somewhere that my dad left me. Heck, I think there's even a "Kleanbore" .38Spl box!
 
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