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Here is whats going to happen...

File a suit for $150 million...
First day in court, Remington's lawyers offer a settlement for an amount significantly lower than $150 million since it will cost the company less.
Lawyer tells family its a good idea.
They settle.
Lawyer takes their massive cut off the top for the little work they did.
Family gets the rest and the satisfaction that they "did something" about it.

... or something along those lines.
 

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Idiot is right. I cannot recall the last time I cleaned a loaded firearm. I wonder how many people refuse to take responsibility when they do something amazingly stupid. Instead they blame whomever they can point a finger at.
 

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It is (was) an issue with the Remington Model 700 that the trigger would/could malfunction. With a round in the chamber just taking it off safe the weapon could discharge with no trigger pull. It is also known to happen when closing the bolt, no trigger pull. Remington never admitted wrongdoing but there is a standing recall as I understand it for older versions of the 700.

http://www.thetruthaboutguns.com/2012/06/daniel-zimmerman/remington-settles-trigger-suit/
 

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It is (was) an issue with the Remington Model 700 that the trigger would/could malfunction. With a round in the chamber just taking it off safe the weapon could discharge with no trigger pull. It is also known to happen when closing the bolt, no trigger pull. Remington never admitted wrongdoing but there is a standing recall as I under stand it for older versions of the 700.

http://www.thetruthaboutguns.com/2012/06/daniel-zimmerman/remington-settles-trigger-suit/
I've seen the issue first-hand. Multiple times.

While there is a known issue with certain Rem 700 safeties, it doesn't negate the fact that the neighbor is directly responsible, not Remington, even though it was an accident. The neighbor failed to follow proper procedure.

Making Remington responsible is the same as stating a manufacturer of a piece of machinery is responsible for a person getting killed when cleaning that piece of machinery becuase the person failed to follow proper procedure and use Lock-Out/Tag-Out prior to working on the machine
 

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I've seen the issue first-hand. Multiple times.
It only took me once.;)

I've posted about it here before. Hunting buddy hands me his super dooper Remington 700 all tricked out for doing looonnnng distance shooting in NW Kansas so that I can use it to do some deer slaying.

I go to check it out, slide the bolt shut and hear "BANG".

Good thing I was practicing safe firearm handling and had the muzzle pointed a safe direction.

Simply closing the bolt fired the rifle.

I've never owned a 700 as a result.
 

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I have no issue owning a Remington. If a person follows proper procedures when using/maintaining any firearm, these types of things wouldn't happen.
 

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Wait, I thought I was the only one that have my firearms fully loaded and cocked DURING the cleaning process. Buff that trigger, drink a shot, buff that trigger, drink a shot.
 

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Samurai,

Remington may be culpable here. If the firearm malfunctioned, due to or a design flaw, which there is more than one case of this happening, they could be found partially liable. Yes there are the four basic rules of firearm safety and I follow them to the extreme. I have a Remington 700 Sendero and absolutely love the rifle. Mine has never "surprised" me, but the rifle is not supposed to function that way.
 

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It is (was) an issue with the Remington Model 700 that the trigger would/could malfunction. With a round in the chamber just taking it off safe the weapon could discharge with no trigger pull. It is also known to happen when closing the bolt, no trigger pull. Remington never admitted wrongdoing but there is a standing recall as I under stand it for older versions of the 700.

http://www.thetruthaboutguns.com/2012/06/daniel-zimmerman/remington-settles-trigger-suit/
I really don't know. I have never seen an actual recall. I am not defending anyone either. It may be an issue. Just like someone putting a finger on a trigger may be an issue. I tend to think the latter in the case of this story as the man was supposedly "cleaning" the rifle.
 

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Right. With out knowing, and like anyone would admit "I pulled the trigger" it would be difficult to reach a conclusion here. Just pointing out that there is room for doubt.
 

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Samurai,

Remington may be culpable here. If the firearm malfunctioned, due to or a design flaw, which there is more than one case of this happening, they could be found partially liable. Yes there are the four basic rules of firearm safety and I follow them to the extreme. I have a Remington 700 Sendero and absolutely love the rifle. Mine has never "surprised" me, but the rifle is not supposed to function that way.
Agreed. Remington will be found culpable, @least to some extent, as there is a known safety issue.

Problem is, and I am not defending Remington, but if the neighbor used proper procedures, this would not have happened and the teenager would not have died. The issue would have shown it's face on the range where, if he had any intelligence, the neighbor would then have it serviced by a qualified smith and have the problem corrected immediately.
 

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I really don't know. I have never seen an actual recall. I am not defending anyone either. It may be an issue. Just like someone putting a finger on a trigger may be an issue. I tend to think the latter in the case of this story as the man was supposedly "cleaning" the rifle.
Agreed. How many times have we heard of reports of someone shooting themselves becuase they were "cleaning" their pistol?
 

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The neighbor is to blame. He didn't practice safe handling techniques or it wouldn't have mattered. #1 you don't clean a loaded gun. #2 you never chamber a round in a rifle that is pointed in an unsafe direction. Period. Even if it was a malfunction, the firearm was being handled in an unsafe manner. He never should have had a chambered weapon pointed in an unsafe direction. In fact, he shouldn't have had an unloaded weapon pointed in an unsafe direction.
 

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This is the first I've heard about this. I bought a Remington 700 about 35 years ago. Does it have this defect?
 

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It wasn't just the 700 series. I have a 600 that does the same thing it even went back to Remington for the recall and it still goes off. I put it away and told my family to never shoot it. Truman
 

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If you over pressure a gun or anything else , any item can be damaged and make unsafe for use.
 

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It only took me once.;)

I've posted about it here before. Hunting buddy hands me his super dooper Remington 700 all tricked out for doing looonnnng distance shooting in NW Kansas so that I can use it to do some deer slaying.

I go to check it out, slide the bolt shut and hear "BANG".

Good thing I was practicing safe firearm handling and had the muzzle pointed a safe direction.

Simply closing the bolt fired the rifle.

I've never owned a 700 as a result.
Key information here, and has nothing to do with the so-called defective Remmy 700 trigger: "all tricked out for long-range shooting." Some Bozo incorrectly adjusted the trigger, reducing the pull weight too much and not tuning in enough engagement.

If properly tuned, the Remmy 700 trigger is safe and reliable. It's the Gumps using the rifles, not the rifles, that are at fault.

The problem with the mid-80s 700s was corrected years ago.
 
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