1911Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
416 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Gargoyle can't be idle any longer. He needs to represent his community and county in the same positive manner that he represented his Corps and country at the embassies overseas. It is time for him to become an officer of the law.

Heading off to the orientation and testing process in a couple weeks for the local sheriff's department. I have a good idea of what they are looking for. Any words of advice?

------------------
If you don't mind being where you are, you are not lost.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
14,948 Posts
Originally posted by Gargoyle:
Any words of advice?

-Carry a 1911 if you can.
-Bad guys don't wear holsters.
-Yes, you do have to pay for donuts.
-Practice faking a smile - you will need this skill.
-Shoot as much as you can.
-Flash-bangs are really loud, and they are not toys (Steve).
-Carry a spare pair of socks and shoes in the trunk.
-Do unto others as you would have others do unto you - unless they are trying to shoot you.
-Don't abuse your position to check out your daughter's new boyfriend for wants and warrants.
-If you really are going to speed, please put the lights on. Nothing pisses motorists off more than a speeding cop with no light bar on.
-Handcuffs are for bad guys. Telling the Sarge that you forgot them at home is no excuse. Telling the Sarge that you forget them at home with your significant other hooked-up, will get you a suspension.
-Carry a spare set of cuffs.
-Not all cops are gun guys - seek the ones that are, and know the ones that aren't.
-Trust your instincts - you will live longer.
-Don't eat so many donuts - you will live longer.


Seriously, good luck. Be safe, be careful and be proud of what you do. Let us know how it turns out!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
853 Posts
Any words of advice? [/B]
Yes I do. First of all if you make it and eventually graduate from the Academy you will know just enough to be dangerous. Realize that you know nothing and are more of a menace than useful for about your first year.

Keep your mouth shut and seek advice constantly. Control your temper and your ego. You are not a Marine anymore you are a "Servant." Servants are humble.

Pat's first law of police work is knowing that honey and kindness will get you what you want faster than a stick and bullying.

I will be thinking of you when I take off this blue suit for the last time on Monday December 31st at 5:30 PM Pacific time. I hope that you find happiness in what you do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,005 Posts
Shane, I've known a few cops that would do well to read and heed your list.
It's not as tongue-in-cheek as it first appears.

Side note, regarding your advice on spare handcuffs. I saw something on television once that I've never heard of "on the street". For the life of me, I can't think why it would not work, but then again, it seems a bit crazy.

The officer kept nylon cable ties in his hat, using them for spare cuffs when he had multiple bad guys to deal with.

Any comments? Department policies? Horror stories?

------------------
If God didn't want us to own guns, why did He make the 1911?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Originally posted by jpwright:

Side note, regarding your advice on spare handcuffs. I saw something on television once that I've never heard of "on the street". For the life of me, I can't think why it would not work, but then again, it seems a bit crazy.

The officer kept nylon cable ties in his hat, using them for spare cuffs when he had multiple bad guys to deal with.

Any comments? Department policies? Horror stories?

[/B]
I'm not a LEO, but I can comment on the cable ties. Carry them all the time in the field. You can quickly tie or bind just about anything with them. I'm speaking of the really long, thick ones. I've even used them to make a quick-and-dirty hobble for a horse. Very, very usefull.

They are damn tough. They aren't going to come off by pulling, twisting or chewing. They have to be cut off.

Weight is essentially nothing, so you can carry lots. And they do fit well in the inside brim of a large hat; but do stiffen it somewhat.

They are usually seen used in abundance in the news films showing mass arrests during *crowd* control.

DQ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,689 Posts
Best of luck on the test etc. This is not a decision that should be taken lightly, its serious business but I'm sure you know that.

I have thirty two years in and cant wait to pull the plug. I am tired, and proud at the same time. You will never have another job like it.



------------------
No man is above the law and no man is below it. Nor do we ask any mans permission when we require him to obey it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Gargoyle,

In no particular order, here is my advice: to get hired, be prepared to test with a dozen to several dozen agencies. Don't get dismayed by rejection letters. The more you test, the better you get at it. If you can get on as a reserve officer somewhere first, take it and learn from it while you continue testing. It'll help you tremendously. If you have a college education, that can also help but is not always a requirement. Get the Barron's police test book (about 1" thick"" from your local bookstore and go through the entire thing until you know it forwards and backwards.

In WA state, there are about 400 applicants for every LE job . . . I can only figure in IL it is about the same.

Don't set your heart on a particular agency. Just get on SOMEWHERE, get the academy, FTO, and a year or two under your belt and then lateral to where you really want to go.

Don't apply just to big dept's. The small ones often may have fewer openings, but also a heckuva lot less applicants. Competing with 25 people for 2 jobs is better than competing with 400 people for 10 jobs.

Be prepared for it to take awhile, even if you pass the written, physical, and interview, you'll be placed on a ranked list with others and selected in order of your rank on the list. This can take a long time.

Do some ride-alongs with various agencies and learn as much as you can. Ask what officers like and dislike about their agencies, ask them for advice on getting hired and taking tests.

Never, ever lie, minimize, or embellish anything on your application, interview, or background. This is the fastest way out of the process, and out of the profession. If you did something, be truthful about it. Agencies aren't looking for perfect people, but they are looking for people who are truthful in all circumstances, and for people who learn from their mistakes.

SF
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
14,948 Posts
Originally posted by jpwright:
The officer kept nylon cable ties in his hat, using them for spare cuffs when he had multiple bad guys to deal with.

Yep, nylon ties work very well in a pinch. The 3/8" wide ones are great!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
252 Posts
Test in as many agencies as you can...Use your Marine Corps experiences to your advantage in interviews...make sure all of your background packets are the same, agencies you test at will contact each other..go on ride alongs in each agency before interviews..most of all look forward to the most rewarding job you can get outside of the Corps...Semper Fi and good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,417 Posts
Originally posted by SF:

Don't apply just to big dept's. The small ones often may have fewer openings, but also a heckuva lot less applicants. Competing with 25 people for 2 jobs is better than competing with 400 people for 10 jobs.


SF

Wow, the small department I applied for had over 200 applicants for 1 job offer.

Didn't make the cut. Bummed me out but I'm still trying.

Ross T.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
287 Posts
Hey Devil Dog,
When I was being interviewed by the PD I work for, I was asked, "What can you bring to this department?" I responded with the three pillars of the Marine Corps, "I will bring honor, courage, and commitment to this department." I drew from what I learned in the Marines and college to give them the answers they were looking for. Exude a sense of calmness during what is supposed to be a nerve racking interview and you will come out shining.

Semper Fi,
gunny
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
416 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Originally posted by gunny:
Hey Devil Dog,
When I was being interviewed by the PD I work for, I was asked, "What can you bring to this department?" I responded with the three pillars of the Marine Corps, "I will bring honor, courage, and commitment to this department." I drew from what I learned in the Marines and college to give them the answers they were looking for. Exude a sense of calmness during what is supposed to be a nerve racking interview and you will come out shining.

Semper Fi,
gunny
Thanks Leatherneck! I've been running through hypotheticals and have developed some answers that I strongly believe and can prove in an interview. The pillars are great as well as the Leadership/teamwork relationship and traits found in such.

MSG duty has given me the opportunity to positively represent my Corps and my country in foriegn lands. Now I want to represent my department and community. Hope they give me the chance!


------------------
If you don't mind being where you are, you are not lost.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,187 Posts
Good advice, hummmm lets see.

Learn to be a good listener.
Buy and carry several sets of handcuffs.
Carry a spare key to your patrol car in your billfold.
Buy the best flash light that you can afford.
Carry a Glock 21 or a 1911.
Carry a patrol carbine in the trunk or in a gun lock in the vehicle.
Don't duck calls and carry your weight.
Treat the public like you would like to be treated if in their shoes.
Live up to your oath to protect and defend the Constituion.
Never bring any disgrace or discredit on your badge.
When you get married make sure your wife understands the job.

7th
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Hey Gargoyle,

Don't take this the wrong way . . . but you probably don't want to come across as *too* militaristic. This plays into false perceptions of military folk being robotic, non-thinking, blood-thirsty machines. Do not expect that the folks on your oral board will all have military experience. Oftentimes, these boards have civilians from human resources on them.

Sell them on other facets of your experience. Hit a few points in particular, such as: your experience working/living with people from diverse cultural/racial backgrounds: thinking-on-your feet/problem solving: service to others and community; etc.

Be the nice young man from next door who has a brain, who will do the right thing, who can think out of the box, who will help little old ladies cross the street, who smiles (genuinely), and who is NOT power hungry or *aggressive*.

It doen't hurt to have some community volunteer-type experience. Involvement with big-brother or other youth mentoring programs may score you some points.

And of course, if you don't have any college classes, get some under your belt. Mathematics and grammar/english composition will always help you do better in testing, and in the job for later. Computer proficiency is highly desired, and some agencies have a typing proficiency requirement of 30 wpm, mimimum.

I hit all the areas I could: military/veterans's preference, college degree, corrections, youth mentoring, and talking to friends who worked in the field. Oh yeah, I applied to over 20 agencies. the more you test, the better you get.

Also, once I completed my BA degree, I went from typically finishing in about the top third to the top tenth. Funny, how that happens, eh?


SF
(Proud to have been Sgt USMC 89-95, MOS's 5811/5814/6162/8531)
 

·
In Memoriam
Joined
·
683 Posts
I can't add much advise to what's already been given, except this: get a copy of the Law Enforcement Code of Ethics, read it, memorize it, and make it your way of life.

As for getting into law enforcement, one good way to get your foot in the door if you can't find an agency that's hiring is to find one with openings in their Reserve division. Working as a volunteer officer would give you a chance to see the real-life day-to-day operations in a law enforcement agency, and to see if you like the job well enough to do it for a living. At the same time, it will get your foot in the door, and give the agency a chance to see if you're law enforcement material. This may or may not be an option for you; just a thought.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top