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I recently shot at an indoor range for the first time. Expecting the range to have a good ventilation system, I was surprised at how smokey it got. It was so thick, that after leaving I could smell and taste the smoke for the rest of the afternoon. Is this typical for an indoor range?

All the smoke made me consider what was in the air I was breathing. I have been shooting moly-coated bullets lately, and know that airborne moly is supposed to be bad for you. Anyone have any thoughts on whether or not shooting moly coated bullets indoors is a bad thing to be doing? Is the moly the source of the smoke? Are plated or jacketed bullets the way to go here?

Thanks for the help on this.

Chris
 

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No it isn't typical. It's an indication of substandard ventilation. Of four indoor ranges that I shoot at one of them is like that. This isn't a scientific method and perhaps a little gross, but an indicator is when you're done shooting if you blow your nose you should not see black crud in your mucous if the ventilation is adequate.
 

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kodiakemt414 said:
No this is not the norm. I shoot Black Powder indoors with out any problems. Well after a few seconds that is.
Wow

I'm amazed that anyone would let you do that. I've never even considered shooting black powder indoors. I think my range owner would probably have the big one and fall over if I even asked about that.

The place I shoot has carpeting and foam all over the walls to deaden sound. That stuff would stink if you shoot black powder in there.

Have fun.

I'm more worried about the lead. WHen I get the blood level in my Cholesterol checked, I'm having them run a lead sample too.

Mike
 

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Indoor ranges must be well ventillated. Our indoor league was cancelled one time because the ventilators went out.

A couple of guys always wear respirator filters because their lead levels started to creep up and they don't want to stop reloading or shooting.

Blowing your nose and washing your hands after shooting is also a good idea.

Randy
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1961MJS said:
Wow

I'm amazed that anyone would let you do that. I've never even considered shooting black powder indoors. I think my range owner would probably have the big one and fall over if I even asked about that.

The place I shoot has carpeting and foam all over the walls to deaden sound. That stuff would stink if you shoot black powder in there.

Have fun.

I'm more worried about the lead. WHen I get the blood level in my Cholesterol checked, I'm having them run a lead sample too.

Mike
Well you can't shoot the real stuff but the fake stuff still makes a lot of smoke. They are the only indoor range in the area that will let you. Very nice range and the staff is great to boot.
 
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