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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,
I recently inherited 2 1911A1’s however this one I have a lot of questions on. I don’t know very much about the history of these firearms but I have what i believe to be a Springfield frame based on the SA stamped about the trigger guard and the crossed cannons stamped just behind the grip. However when I type the S/N on colts website it tells me it’s a year 1943 Colt. I believe the slide to be a Colt since it’s stamped accordingly but the “m1911a1 U.S. Army” that is stamped is different than the others I have seen. Upon stripping the slide from the frame I could find any additional serial numbers aside from the barrel being stamped Colt and having a C and P stamped on each side. I will post as many pictures below and any feedback would be appreciated. I know the rear sight isn’t correct for the time period and it appears someone did some stippling on the front portion of the grip.
Air gun Grey Trigger Gun barrel Wood

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Air gun Trigger Gun barrel Wood Gun accessory
 

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Also Springfield Armory as the defuncted government arsenal (closed in 1968), not the current commercial company Springfield Inc. that registered Springfield Armory trademark when government arsenal closed door.

Your Colt slide was a typical replacement slide (marked M1911A1 US ARMY), that the contracts specified the manufacturers produce a quantity of spare parts for field repair etc.
 

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I'm thinking its as said, an SA rebuild of a Remington Rand that received a Colt replacement slide. AFTER it left government custody, it was modified, apparently by a hobbyist, to resemble a National Match. Its too far gone now to do anything with other than enjoying it as a shooter if it has good accuracy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I appreciate the feedback from all who have replied! The other 1911 I inherited is a Remington Rand frame and slide. Although the frame isn’t in as good of shape. I would love to hear you all’s thoughts on it as well!
 

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Bubba smithed and ruined 1911, joins many from this time frame…. Best thing to do is just shoot it and don’t look to much into it past this post.

0 collectibility, 0 major resale value… hence why it couldn’t move off consignment.

Not trying to be a ruiner or thread crapper… not my intent, simply giving you the truth of the matter.
 

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It is a match gun but not in the manner of a military national match pistol. Maybe by a unit armorer, maybe by a surplus owner.
Maybe not. Complies with the old rules. The trigger shoe I would have to see up close. This screams unit armorer to me and looks like one of many I shot over the years. Key is how well it’s fit because the armorers were far from gunsmiths for us…lol. Love those guys but they did not have that skill set.

For the OP, You can check the barrel, bushing, and slide/frame fit to get an idea if it was done right. Google “A day with a master gunsmith” and that will walk you through the process. If it’s all good to go then you may have a budget winner.

Bubba smithed and ruined 1911, joins many from this time frame…. Best thing to do is just shoot it and don’t look to much into it past this post.

0 collectibility, 0 major resale value… hence why it couldn’t move off consignment
May not necessarily be true, but likely lost collector value. However, that allows the OP to use without fear and start the adventure of figuring out who/when the work was done. Journey in and of itself. might be some collector value if it was an early gun by the right gunsmith or it’s a solid shooter. While it may not have perfect cosmetics, see how it shoots! It may be a great gun and enjoy!
 

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If pistol #1 could be confirmed as an AMU creation, its value would be much higher, but I don't think confirmation is possible. BTW, I knew an excellent gunsmith who had been an AMU armorer (Reuben Boatwright) but it is also true that the younger ones in the service usually only know about the weapons they have been trained on.
 

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I like the first one. Someone long ago <60's?>made a shooter for under $100. What is the name on the rear sight? I bet it shoots great. I would like to see a photo of the bottom of the slide. Also a photo of the rear of the slide and frame fit. The front strap is High Standard looking but not overdone. If it grouped good I would send the slide off and have it milled for lower target sights. With a nice set of <grips> it would be a keeper.
 

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The "match"-style pistol and the other both share the same type of chisel-point fore-grip stippling. The gunsmith couldn't decide on a "Patridge" or plain flat blade. A unit armorer could have possibly had access to GI match barrels (770414) and a GI "Shark fin" front sight. Can't tell if the Colt commercial barrel hood has been fitted to the slide, but it doesn't look like it was fitted with slide locking lug contact.

The shooter may have had smaller hands since it looks like the smithy used a flat-striated (maybe Gold Cup) mainspring housing, with a trigger shoe on a short M1911A1 trigger. A bullseye shooter would have probably sprung for nice Herrett's grips for traction, vice the GI Keyes (which can get a little slippery with sweat in heat and humidity).
 
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