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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently replaced the ILS on my SA 5". I had taken the mainspring housing off the pistol several times and reinserted the mainspring housing pin without difficulty.

When I actually replaced the mainspring and associated parts, I had a bit of trouble reinserting the retaining pin at the base of the pistol. I had always tapped it out to the right and reinserted it from the same side I extracted it.

With the trouble I had, I was wondering if the pin could be reinserted from left to right, using the dimple (?) in the pin to get some leverage with a punch. Never have done it this way with any gun, but was wondering if it could be done without damage.
 

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I don't have the pin. The original MSH didn't use it so I opted to not install it when I changed the spring. I just use the little hooked hicky do that came with the gun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Actually, the pin I'm talking about is the large pin at the bottom back side of the frame that holds the entire mainspring housing unit in position.
 

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You'll want to double check, but I believe that the MSH pin is non-tapered and non captive fitting. That is, part of what holds it in place is the mainspring pushing down on the MSH. The pin is there to stop the movement in that direction.

If I'm recalling correctly, that would mean that the holes on both sides of the frame were the same as they did not need to retain the pin. Therefore, you should be able to install it from either side.

I've only detail stripped a 1911 4 times, but I think I've always driven them out right to left anyway. That way the rounded end of the pin leads the charge so to speak.

Brian
 

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Hi. I think I know exactly what you are talking about. When I swapped out my ILS MSH with standard parts, the cap pin (?) at the bottom of the MSH assembly was pointy, and protruded slightly out of the bottom of the MSH assembly. This caused the MSH pin to hit it upon putting it in, and was there was resistance in getting it in all the way. If you look at the MSH pin, you'll notice there is a notch in the middle of it, which is where that protruding part fits in. The only thing though, is that you need to hit it with some force to compress the spring enough to allow the pin to go in far enough so that the protruding part can actually rest in the notch. Sounds complicated, but it's easy to see. The pin will go in either way, I just hit the dimpled part with a hammer lightly enough to compress the spring and it went in the rest of the way just fine. Hope this helps.
 

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Pin

Yep, mainspring housing pin is non-directional, just have to tap it in far enough to engage the taper of the MS pin retainer in the notch of the pin.

Start with taper end of pin until it seats.
 

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Using a "Blind"' pin inserted 1st. can help alot if it's being stubborn. an old drill bit shank with a taper/flat ground on one end works well with tapping the MSH pin behind. Did you polish the spring-way in the new MSH, spring pins and OIL same?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the replies. I am always grateful for the help and wealth of knowledge available for the asking on this forum.
 

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FWIW, if you see yourself doing a lot of these, get a small phillips screwdriver with a big grip. Saw off the tip and shape it to fit in the dimple. Then you can use this driver and a smack of your palm to pop the pin out of it's retainer.
 
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