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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I welcome all flames that are necessary...go ahead, try me!


Is a '57 Corvette the same as a 2001?

brass, woodwind, string, vocals...put them together in some order and it's considered music...but is Rock the same as Classical or Jazz or Heavy Metal or Pop or Rap???

OK, my point here is...
A compact, 9mm, polymer 1911??? I think it's sacrilege. I want a full-sized, .45 ACP, steel framed pistol!...Anything else is not a 1911!...rename the damn thing!

IM(not so)H(opinionated)O


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"run like hell...you'll just die tired."
 

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Sniper,
Ok I'll bite. No to the Corvette (would prefer the older one anyday). No to the music question. Probably not to the 3rd question as I prefer the feel of steel, but if it is set up the same as a 1911 what else are you going to call it.

Sorry to hear about your Super Match woes. I went down that road before with a Kimber Gold Match. Too bad mine never worked out. I hope you have better luck.

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Of course they're not, that's why they're given other names. There are very few pistols using the actual "1911" name anyways. Besides, imitation is the best form of flattery. John M. Browning created a superlative weapons platform that is the basis for great guns today. I usually vote with my wallet, if I don't like anything I don't buy it. No one is forcing you to do anything you don't want to do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
another interesting response...

"Interesting point, and I tend to agree with you. I have struggled with this definition issue for a long time. Strictly speaking, there is the M1911 and the M1911A1 both of which were issued to our troops during WWI and WWII. Everything else really should be called something else like "1911-pattern". Also, to me an M1911 or M1911A1 fires a .45 ACP, period. The Army did not adopt .38 Super, 9mm, .40S&W, ect. (The Army Marksmanship Unit did use some .38 Super and .38 Rimless guns but they were never "general issue")

On the other hand, in practical terms, most of the "1911" pistols we see are not GI and something else makes them "1911". That something, to me, is the action -- the trigger, single action mechanism, grip safety, and thumb safety on the frame. I can't quite bring myself to call the new Para-Ordnace LDA pistols "1911" because they don't have the 1911 action, even though they look very much like M1911's. Is the Colt M1991A1 with its firing pin blocking mechanism an M1911? Not in my book. It's a Series 80 Colt. Are the little compacts with their weird guide rods, springs, and bushingless designs true M1911's. To be accurate, we should probably call them M15's after the General Officer's Model which they more closely resemble.

"M1911" is the military designation for the Colt .45 Caliber Automatic Pistol, just as the "M9" designates the Beretta 92F. We don't call every 9mm DA/SA an "M9" but we do it with single action .45 autos. Perhaps this is not entirely rational and reflects more the special place occupied by John Browning and the M1911 in military and firearms history.

Syd" - The Sight M1911



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"run like hell...you'll just die tired."
 
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