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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
On 26 May, 1970 I bought a Browning "9mm Parabellum Automatic Pistol" (description on the manual) at a local sporting goods store for $108.

My wife and I shot it frequently, and a few years later, when my sons turned eight and nine, they started shooting it as well. We put several thousands through the very accurate and trustworthy pistol. :) At the time, we did not know enough to really appreciate it. Whether with commercial ammo, hollow points, or my reloads, it never failed to function well. As I had always done with all my firearms (and continue to do, but even more so), I thoroughly cleaned the Browning after each trip to the range or to the field.;)

Fast forward to 1990. By now, both my sons were US Marines, and we shot together only occasionally. After one session with the Browning among others, I set to clean the trusty handgun. Lo and behold, I noticed what appeared to be a hairline crack on the barrel, right at the chamber. I finished clean it up and set it aside – carefully.:confused:



A few weeks later, I took it to a gun show where there was a Browning collector. I showed him my gun and asked him for an appraisal. I also told him that I was not really interested in selling it – just then, anyway. He looked it over briefly and asked me if I had ever shot it. “Yes”, I replied. He then look it over more closely, and said, “Oh yes, but it has been cleaned well,” so I thanked him.:)

He then looked at the ‘crack’ and said, “Oh, you got a keeper, young man.” I asked him if he was referring to the hairline crack. “Yes,” he said, “but it is not a crack at all.” He explained that Browning had used a method in the late 1960’s of fusing two parts to make the barrel assembly, and that it was supposed to be an improvement. After a year or so, however, Browning determined that it was too costly and did not really make that much difference, so they stopped using the two-part method. He said they were made like that for just a couple of years, which made my gun worth quite a bit more.:rock:

IS THIS TRUE?

I have never fired the gun since then, and probably never will.

BTW, the gun is 99.5% - no blemishes, scratches, wear marks - looks as it did when I bought it. (;) 99.5% because I suspect that someone may find something...) I do have the soft case that came with it as well as the orginal manual.






Thanks for you inputs!

Alex
 

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I can't quite see your s/n is the first digit a "T"? If it is you have a model that was produced in the late sixties to early seventies and is a highly praised pistol for quality and craftsmanship. The grips look to be a light French Walnut and should have a red coating on their backs also denoting a pistol of that period.
"T" pistol in the condition yours is in generally command a price in the mid $700 and up. So you got your self a heck of a buy. If it isn't a "T" it is still a heck of a buy for the price you paid.

And that guy who you asked for an appraisal was blowing smoke up your hoop skirt because FN has made the HP with the split barrel as far back as I can remember and continued through the MKIII. My MKIII is dated 2001 and has a split barrel, My "T" has a split barrel and it's dated 1967, and my Centennial is 1978 and also has a split barrel.

The only thing he said right was that you have a keeper if for no other reason that it's a HP in great shape and it was made completely in Belgium. Enjoy it and keep taking good care of it. :rock:

RC
 

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ingeniero1 said:
On 26 May, 1970 I bought a Browning "9mm Parabellum Automatic Pistol" (description on the manual) at a local sporting goods store for $108.
Inflation sucks!!! I wish I could pay that little for my guns.:bawling:

I have a .40 S&W Hi-Power that also has a "split" barrel. It's normal these days. I think your HP might have more value since it's made and assembled entirely in Belgium.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
RC,
The serial number does start with a "T".

Glad to know the real scoop about the construction. Still, I will keep the Browning 'in the safe', and use my other handguns for matches, field use, etc.

Thanks to everyone for the advise!

Alex
 

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Well, in my opinion, every Hi Power is special. :)

As to the 2-piece barrel, that is actually a very common thing. However, T-series pistols in and of themselves are very desireable.

The guy was right about one thing -- you have a keeper.:rock:

Wes
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks guys,

The Hi-Power will thus reside rather permanently in the handgun compartment of the safe, together with my 1974-vintage, mint Python.

A minor note. While reading about the value of firearms, one writer stated that the original box, the manual (or instructions) and the receipt, also add to the overall value of the gun.

I knew about the box and manual, but I never suspected the receipt. Fortunately, I have kept all the boxes, manuals, AND receipts for the past 35+ years.

Alex
 

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Great gun... when I saw the title to this thread, "Is my Browning Pistol Special?" I instantly thought, "Yes, all of John M. Browning's creations are special!":p
 
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