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100,000 rounds to break even?

Damn, either your math skills suck or you were buying new brass and leaving it on the ground.

Even buying commercial cast bullets it's going to take less than 100K to break even.

I had $1400 in the last 650 I bought by the time I bolted it to the bench.

Using commercial cast bullets it breaks down like this.

Bullet $0.10
Primer $0.03
Powder $0.01125
Brass No cost since it's basically free.

Note these would have been prices during the Obama terms.

45 ACP would have run ya right at $14.25 a box OR LESS.

You should have been saving at least $15/100.

Total cost on a 550 set up should have been around $1000 at the very most.

Saving $15/100 would mean you would break even at the 6666 round mark. A far cry from 100K.


I cast my own bullets. My current costs to load 45 ACP runs $5.25/100

That's a minimum savings of $25/100

I broke even on the new 650 with 5600 rounds loaded.

The 650 include the case collator, strong mount, bullet tray and around $300 of after market parts and upgrades

Saying it would take 100,000 rounds to break even means you were saving a penny a round.
At one point, it was costing me more to reload 9mm than I could buy it locally. It all depends on how much you paid for components and what the going price for ammunition is.
 

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At one point, it was costing me more to reload 9mm than I could buy it locally. It all depends on how much you paid for components and what the going price for ammunition is.
I'm not going to say you are wrong but you didn't buy carefully or in bulk. But even now in the worst component climate in my memory- I can still load recently bought "pandemic priced components" into great ammo, priced below 2 years ago loaded ammo prices. I've bought powder, primers and projectiles in the last couple months that back that statement up.

The math in the earlier referenced post was off by a factor of 10, at least... unless someone purposely shopped for the smallest qty of highest costing components they could possibly find.
 

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I'm not going to say you are wrong but you didn't buy carefully or in bulk. But even now in the worst component climate in my memory- I can still load recently bought "pandemic priced components" into great ammo, priced below 2 years ago loaded ammo prices. I've bought powder, primers and projectiles in the last couple months that back that statement up.

The math in the earlier referenced post was off by a factor of 10, at least... unless someone purposely shopped for the smallest qty of highest costing components they could possibly find.
I’m sure you’re right, I’m not overly bright and I always seem to buy high and sell low. Bottom line, I was able to enjoy my range time throughout this pandemic!
 

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I understand the thoughts behind a single stage press for the beginner. I began with a Lyman All American 4 station & have started many on their way with a 550 Dillon. Some can start with a clutch, some not. Training wheels are sometimes needed but not always. The 550 is about as simple a machine as there is & allows loading one cartridge at a time. For me it's a win-win. But that's just me.
 

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Still, there is something to say about the “feel” as you learn on a SS that translates over.
Granted, more pressure is needed to run all four at once. But, you’re right, the 550 allows for one at a time. Still lots of moving parts for the newb.......
 

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Learning on a 550 isn't problematic. I did it, just started off setting up one die at a time and running singles- just like the SS guys. The only difference was that I didn't have to change out the die with every pull. I see the value in owning a SS but to say you need one to learn on, discounts both the ease of the 550 and the ability of the average guy.
 

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Reloading on a SS allowed me to more fully understand the basics, such as OAL, crimp, and expanding the case. It all may depend on how adapt the pupil is mechanically. To facilitate a bit more speed I have picked up a couple additional SS presses over the years, it's still hard to pass up a complete used Rock Chucker, in serviceable condition, that someone is selling for $60. For someone more mechanically trained and with less time on their hands, SS presses may not be the best choice.

Grumpy
 
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Someone shooting 1k a month is ALREADY loading, and a single stage press for a newbie (as I said in my post) is anything BUT stupid advice, but your comment is ill advised.
You're wrong. Not everyone shooting 1k a month is already loading. I know more than a handful in that group.

As I stated. You can load one round at a time on a progressive press but you can't load multiple rounds at a time on a single stage.

Taking your advice is like telling a new driver they need to learn to drive with a Model T. After all, if they don't learn to hand advance the spark and to hand crank the motor they aren't really learning to drive.
 

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Still, there is something to say about the “feel” as you learn on a SS that translates over.
Granted, more pressure is needed to run all four at once. But, you’re right, the 550 allows for one at a time. Still lots of moving parts for the newb.......
The "feel" is a great point. The 550 does have a different feel to me than the SS. While out of context a good sturdy press mounted on a steel bench [steel to steel] has a feel that must to experienced to understand.
 

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Grumpy in #149 brings up a good point about time. How much ya got? In a hurry?
Shoot 1000 rounds a month? Peaceful solitude around the bench without people pulling you in ten different directions is priceless. SS use can be a perfect picture.
Then, ya got El Nutzo family schedules, work, soccer brats, barbecue (not in Ca.,causes cancer) you name it. Jumping on the progressive to crank out several hundred rounds in a hour is just the ticket. And of course every scenario in between. The only thing that DOESNT make sense is why anyone would waste money paying retail for loaded ammo!!😆
 

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As a relative ‘newb’ to reloading, I guess I did it backwards..;). I can say starting with a progressive press (xl750) was the right decision for me based on shooting volume (45acp,9mm,38 super). Starting to reload also changed my shooting volume because it added different dimensions to shooting,ie,chronographing loads; keeping it interesting and fun; besides allowing me to keep shooting. I recently added a single stage press to start loading my bottleneck calibers, because the inherent different areas of focus involved with them. Anyone getting into reloading should be ready and willing to put in the time, effort, investment and withstand some aggravation along the way.
 

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Grumpy in #149 brings up a good point about time. How much ya got? In a hurry?
Shoot 1000 rounds a month? Peaceful solitude around the bench without people pulling you in ten different directions is priceless. SS use can be a perfect picture.
Then, ya got El Nutzo family schedules, work, soccer brats, barbecue (not in Ca.,causes cancer) you name it. Jumping on the progressive to crank out several hundred rounds in a hour is just the ticket. And of course every scenario in between. The only thing that DOESNT make sense is why anyone would waste money paying retail for loaded ammo!!😆
You can always pull slower, or run singles if you need more solitude! I spend lots of time at tge bench “researching“ future loads. Heck, sometimes i run ammo on the 550 but hand throw powder to slow it down. 😂

as to costs- fully set up on a SS isn’t that dramatically different than say a 550. Within $250 ish and that’s not a big difference in the grand scheme of things.

I love the SS but don’t load on it much. Use it mostly for utility work.
 

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Starting to reload also changed my shooting volume
This is always the argument about loading “being cheaper”.
It can’t be looked at from the standpoint of “you’re gonna shoot more”. Being cheaper refers to the same amount of ammo. Now, those of us that have gone off the deep end refer to it as a hobby like golf. I guess we could put it in perspective. It is far less expensive than boat ownership!
 

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This is always the argument about loading “being cheaper”.
It can’t be looked at from the standpoint of “you’re gonna shoot more”. Being cheaper refers to the same amount of ammo. Now, those of us that have gone off the deep end refer to it as a hobby like golf. I guess we could put it in perspective. It is far less expensive than boat ownership!
And there it is! The proverbial kick in the nuts! I'm headed to the lake as soon as the boy gets up... we just got back from a golf vacation and well- loading goes without saying!! :cry:
 

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Money pit! I’m headed to Academy to get another Deep Cycle......then to the lake!!
I have enough ammo loaded.......
 

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Money pit! I’m headed to Academy to get another Deep Cycle.....then to the lake!!
I actually replaced 3 of them yesterday!! granted they were 5 years old but still cost 3/4's as much as my 550!

My boat experience has been that when you fish year round, you end up spending much less on them... something about sitting, just eats them up.

tight lines!
 

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You're wrong. Not everyone shooting 1k a month is already loading. I know more than a handful in that group.

As I stated. You can load one round at a time on a progressive press but you can't load multiple rounds at a time on a single stage.

Taking your advice is like telling a new driver they need to learn to drive with a Model T. After all, if they don't learn to hand advance the spark and to hand crank the motor they aren't really learning to drive.
So how many folks do you think can learn to drive by starting out with a top fuel dragster or a NASCAR cup car or maybe a GT-40 road racer.

It goes both ways.

My opinion is this,,,

If someone wants to learn to reload and has someone experienced to teach them, then by all means start by cranking them out on a progressive.

If that person is going to learn on their own I believe slower is safer.

With all that said, do as you please,,,your hands, face, life, and money. See, that’s easy

Eric


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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This is always the argument about loading “being cheaper”.
It can’t be looked at from the standpoint of “you’re gonna shoot more”. Being cheaper refers to the same amount of ammo. Now, those of us that have gone off the deep end refer to it as a hobby like golf. I guess we could put it in perspective. It is far less expensive than boat ownership!
You may have misunderstood what I wrote.
I didn’t say or mean I shoot more since I reload. I reload because I wanted to, not to shoot more or save money. My inventory was and is fine actually. If anything, I’ve been able to keep more on hand or load what I want And use most.
 
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