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Manufactured in Croatia by HS Produkt and sold in America by Springfield ?
It would not surprise me if this was the case. It is the only way they are going to be able to make money on them. Just like Tisas making their clone in Turkey.
 
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This beauty has a full length extractor not a cheap short cut in the right side of the slide. It is no clutsy knocknoff or enhanced with ingenious solutions to non-existent problems. If you want to dress up for the new Georgia open carry law...this lets folks know you are a gentleman with class, not an anarchist♡.
The long extractor is a weak point in the original design. It was replaced around 1962 with the external extractor. It was a design improvement as well as a cost saving move. As for solutions to non-existence problems well the BHP is a good gun but it need 3 things to become great. Better sights, a better trigger and a better thumb safety. This particular one has all of those and a few things to make it pretty.

 

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The whole beauty of the Hi-Power is that it's a very thin and svelte handgun. If they go fattening up the front strap and all that then it's going to be like Scarlett Johansson with another 20 pounds on her.

Assuming the rumors are true I'm not really sure what Springfield's game is going to be. The original Hi-Power is a dated design, much like a WW1-era 1911, but if you go and add all the modern features people expect you're going to piss off the purists. The Hi-Power is also not a very durable handgun and has a much lower lifespan than most modern pistols. If it doesn't satisfy either purists/collectors or hardcore shootists then it might become a flash in the pan.
I dunno. I think you could make that front strap just thick enough to allow 30 LPI checkering and it would not noticeably increase the grip size.

I think there would be a demand. Look at all the people getting ugly stipple jobs done to Hi-powers. Even the best done stipple jobs look crummy next to checkering IMO.

Here's mine. I think a "modernized" version like this with a checkered front strap would sell. I see a lot people doing similar upgrades. Would be nice to get it all in one package without having to do a bunch of custom work. BTW I made the beavertail myself out of a 1911 grip safety and silver soldered it on.

Removed the mag safety and put in an EGW sear and the trigger is very nice (for a Hi-power at least)

It's an Inglis with the SN on the side so I was able to serrate the front strap and rear of butt 40 LPI but it's just not very "grippy".

White Light Air gun Black Green
Revolver Air gun Trigger Wood Gun barrel
 

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It'd be cool if somehow SA could bring out some worthy renditions to market. Something with an improved trigger and subdued markings.

Frontstrap checkering would be mighty appealing.

Functional sized beavertail....not a huge sweeping beavertail.

While I'm begging for stuff....might as well beg for a good fixed rear and either fiber optic front....or domed & polished gold bead front.
This is Springfield Armory we're talking about, not Nighthawk, Novak, or Cylinder & Slide.
The only hope is that they will offer something worth turning a customizer loose on.
 

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Riddle me this batman ....

Springfield made a small run of the Vickers Tactical Master Class 1911, which are sold out, no more to be found. Good gun, as many owners here have proclaimed. There are many more who have called their gun stores, put names on waiting lists, etc. Springfield can't fill that order. So why would they go off and tease about bringing some cryptic pistol back when they can't keep up with existing demand? Are they going to make 500 of them like they did the Vickers gun and then stop? Again?
 

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The long extractor is a weak point in the original design. It was replaced around 1962 with the external extractor. It was a design improvement as well as a cost saving move. As for solutions to non-existence problems well the BHP is a good gun but it need 3 things to become great. Better sights, a better trigger and a better thumb safety.
The MKIII solved two out of the three. It had decent dovetailed sights and an ambi extended safety. Unfortunately it still lacked a decent trigger, and the ones made during the last few years of its production had absolutely atrocious triggers. My local gun shop had one on hand a few years ago, and when I tried out the trigger I thought the safety was on at first. It broke at what must've been 8 pounds, if not more. My personal MKIII has a 5# trigger, not horrible but nothing to write home about either. Maybe SA will ditch the mag safety altogether, which alone would make a big improvement.
 

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The MKIII solved two out of the three. It had decent dovetailed sights and an ambi extended safety. Unfortunately it still lacked a decent trigger, and the ones made during the last few years of its production had absolutely atrocious triggers. My local gun shop had one on hand a few years ago, and when I tried out the trigger I thought the safety was on at first. It broke at what must've been 8 pounds, if not more. My personal MKIII has a 5# trigger, not horrible but nothing to write home about either. Maybe SA will ditch the mag safety altogether, which alone would make a big improvement.
IMHO the MKIII sights still suck and the the thumb safety is usable but not good but YMMV.
 

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Silly. The CZ75 has a cruddy safety and a yucky DA trigger. Tried one once and my Browning Hi-Power MK III in 40 S&W shot better. I really hated the feel of the tang in my hand. Then again, my last Browning Hi Power MK III 9mm had a terrible trigger that was 12-13 pounds. I suspect both the CZ and MK III would have been just fine after visiting a gunsmith.

This is the best part of gun ownership in the USA (except California and soon Maryland with their handgun rosters): there is a gun for everyone.
When using a CZ75, I never have occasion to experience the D/A trigger. Carried C1 ... and from experience with a Glock, discovered that my hands eject a dud / FtF / light-strike before my mind even starts to consider any alternative ... so the D/A 2nd strike potential is wasted on me. It could just as well be S/A. Very much like the feel of both.
 
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I had a couple guys get mad at me because they went and bought new HPs and they had terrible triggers. If you have a terrible trigger you are probably going to shoot terribly. That is the biggest difference I saw right off in Portuguese HPs. My beater HP was a Mauser that was manf in Czech
contract for Germans post WW2. Trigger was target but a lot better than Port guns as was my 1968 HP that was bought new.
 

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Manufactured in Croatia by HS Produkt and sold in America by Springfield ?
The quality of a Croatian made hand gun has to be better than any Springfield produced gun. But, I'd still not want one unless FNH made it at their plant in Belgium. The original is always the best.
 

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I have had a LOT of Hi Powers over several decades. The absolute best for accuracy was an early MK III.

Now I used to build custom Hi Powers, and that particular MK III's barrel was fit so well I just skipped installing the Bar-Sto I ordered.

Other than external finish, HP's only got better, not worse.
 

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I wonder how much of the P35's historical record of lack of durability (no doubt deserved) was due to the softness of the steel used in their production. I've read a handful of blurbs by folks who know a great deal about Hi Powers, and to a man they all are in agreement that everything made before the MkIII was quite noticeably soft. Great to preserve the life of your tooling but maybe not the way to make the most robust pistol you can.

Then of course came the cast frame Hi Powers, which although derided by old people who refuse to learn new facts about metallurgy, have been borne out over time as indeed being stronger (harder? more resilient? I don't know) than their forged frame forerunners.

IF SA is indeed bringing the P35 out again, and IF they make it with an improved metallurgy (whether that means cast, or machined out of better steel or heat treated better or whatever) I certainly think it is possible for them to bring one out that might walk all over the originals durability wise. And that would be a neat gun to own.

P.S. No firing pin safety, please.
 

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19ontheslide - Don't worry about firing pin blocks...the way they did it on the MK III was brilliant, and it actually cleared up a problem HP's have always had. Doesn't affect the trigger even a little; slick solution.

Now as to the metallurgy of the HP. For its day, it was clearly one of the toughest 9mm's made. Having worked on literally thousands of surplus HP's, I can tell you the HP was more than enough for the 9mm cartridge it was designed for. The problem is, the 9mm it was designed for is not the 9mm we use today.

But keep in mind, when we switched to 9mm NATO it wasn't just Hi Powers that were breaking. The US military Beretta and Sig's required some significant changes to accommodate. The Sig got a completely redesigned slide. And all the other new 9mm's ended up being redesigned to address the much hotter NATO cartridge.

Shoot 124gr NATO ammo in other 9mm's contemporary to the HP and you'll begin to realize it was one of the toughest 9mm's made in WW2. P-38's, P1's, P5's, and Beretta 1951's...ALL will very quickly have broken locking blocks, and broken slides.

Star 9mm's, you'll break the slide near the ejection port. Lugers, you'll end up breaking the upper receiver at the locking recesses. As tough as the VIS 35 Radom is, you will eventually break that slide.
 

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I wonder how much of the P35's historical record of lack of durability (no doubt deserved) was due to the softness of the steel used in their production. I've read a handful of blurbs by folks who know a great deal about Hi Powers, and to a man they all are in agreement that everything made before the MkIII was quite noticeably soft. Great to preserve the life of your tooling but maybe not the way to make the most robust pistol you can.

Then of course came the cast frame Hi Powers, which although derided by old people who refuse to learn new facts about metallurgy, have been borne out over time as indeed being stronger (harder? more resilient? I don't know) than their forged frame forerunners.

IF SA is indeed bringing the P35 out again, and IF they make it with an improved metallurgy (whether that means cast, or machined out of better steel or heat treated better or whatever) I certainly think it is possible for them to bring one out that might walk all over the originals durability wise. And that would be a neat gun to own.

P.S. No firing pin safety, please.
The softness of the BHP is more myth than truth. Pre cast MKIII guns will not take a steady diet of NATO or +P ammo but they are not anywhere near as fragile as people make them out to be. A lot of that comes from the Brits who shot NATO ball and sub machine gun ammo through their BHPs. I am with @DarkLord the gun has proven durable If you replace the recoil springs every 2500-3000 and the hammer spring every 10,000 or if you run a lighter weight one like the 26# vs the factory 32# the gun will last. I am talking about over 25,000 rounds. How many people are shooting 25,000+ out of a single handgun. At todays 9mm ammo prices you are talking about $8,000+ worth of 9mm. If you can afford to shoot that out of a single handgun you can afford to buy a second BHP. In todays modern world of JHP even for defense there is no need to shoot +P ammo. Standard pressure Gold Dots and HST get the job done and feed reliability in the BHP platform often even with the older humped barrel. Lots of the old myths about the platform refuse to die.

For my money the best BHPs in terms of functionality are the early forged frame MKIIIs. If you basing it purely on looks I would choose and early T series because the bluing process and the hand finishing was better than the later T series which are no different that a early C series. I do not go earlier than that for anything that I was going to shoot a lot because the internal extractor is a weak point and prone to failure and breakage over time. The modern replacements do not always work and are $100+.

I have lot of BHPs. I shoot them more than any other 9mm in the safe. I am yet to shoot one to failure. If you take care of them properly they will outlive you. IMHO As to what SA will make I do not think you are going to see a super duper machined from barstock pistol. The BHP was discontinued because at MSRP of $900 it was not a good seller in todays world of tactical plastic. Making a gun out of machined barstock is going to cost the end user more than $1000. I imagine we are going to see SA buy forged frames, slide and barrels from Turkey either Tisas or Grisan and they will assemble them here.

The new Grisan has a $528 MSRP so if SA wants to sell a BHP clone it has to be within a few hundred dollars of that or have significant upgrades. My guess is we will get a rebranded Turkish gun with SA assembly QC and Customer service in the $795 MSRP range for a MKIII style base gun.
 

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19ontheslide - Don't worry about firing pin blocks...the way they did it on the MK III was brilliant, and it actually cleared up a problem HP's have always had. Doesn't affect the trigger even a little; slick solution.
I have no doubt you're correct, but my personal distaste for firing pin safeties on the P35 or the 1911 has nothing to do with trigger pulls.😉
 

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I have no doubt you're correct, but my personal distaste for firing pin safeties on the P35 or the 1911 has nothing to do with trigger pulls.😉
The manual of arms is at least as important to me: accustomed clearing a pistol; aiming at the target and a final trigger press before removing from the line. If only for my own use, I'd be willing to disable the M.D. ... but not for student use. Not because less safe: because lawyers.
 
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