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apparently i posted this question in the wrong place. apologies. so a few thoughts i have had over the years: mr browning did not get to finish this one, so another engineer did it for fn. this gets to be interesting when you consider that during the design process he would redo large parts of a design from scratch. and work on pieces of the design for years. the magazine disconnector was due his ability to see the future...lawyers. more likely a government contract requirement. the high power does have some advanced features, probably the link less barrel being the most important. how does it compare with the p38 walther in 2021? it seems springfield is considering bringing out a new one. (see post in springfield section by dub from georgia)
 

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Trim some fat off of a CZ75 or Shadow 2, and you have a better pistol.


[........and I wave my Glock 23 in your general direction!]
 

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Militarily, yes; absolutely. It is not compatible with current military 9mm ammunition. For civilian self defense...not even close to obsolete.
 

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I just read through the hottest High Power Thread on the forum, in the Springfield section (thanks best.45).

Worth a read... Link

A similar discussion - Is the PPK Obsolete - is going on at the Walther Forum. Romance and James Bond aside, I think the High Power has a lot more modern going on for it than the PP series. I seem to compare all other pistols I encounter to the High Power, eliminating most without the need to even hold them.

Perhaps BHP user/owners are obsolete.

Cheers,

Tim
 

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As a duty gun I would say due to its manual of arms it is not longer relevant. Most modern Armys and LEO are not carrying SAO steel framed pistols. It is a tactical plastic world. It has not been a popular choice for gun games in a long time. As a self defense carry gun I believe it is still relevant. I do believe less and less people find them appealing and those who do are older and like muscle cars and other things which appealed to the older generation they are not as appealing to younger shooters. It has never had the same following as the 1911. If you asked the avg gun owner who is under 30 if the own a BHP or have ever shot one I would imagine the majority don't and have not.
 

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Years ago I carried an FN NATO High Power and it never failed me. Not once. Neither did a FEG clone I bought dirt cheap over 20 years hence. Of course I regularly cleaned/lubed them and ran recoil springs suited for +p & +p+ ammo. Those guns are long gone, but I admit this new EAA import interests me.
 

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The wrong place wasn't the issue exactly, it was extremely similar to another popular thread (redundant actually - like that needed explaining :) )

It depends on your understanding/definition/criteria of obsolete...which is why the first round is still going after a month...people are splitting hairs over what obsolete means (among other hair splitting).
The answer is the same for all of these antique guns...they have probably disappeared permanently from Law Enforcement and the Military for cost and other reasons...arguably obsolete in the conceptual meaning of the word...but there will always be individuals that continue to use them...so arguably not obsolete in an extreme literal interpretation.

From my point of view, people cling to 1911s more than Browning Hi-Powers. Is there enough difference between a 1911 and a Hi-Power to bicker through it all over again?
 

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Frankly , I never thought it was all that great. It was not , for the most part , designed by JMB. The HP at the time of his death was a striker-fired pistol. Most of it's features were way around the 1911 patents owned by Colt.

I often see a comparison with the CZ-75. I own both , and have disassembled each down to it's bare parts and don't find many design aspects in common but the magazine and the ramped barrel..
 

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Considering its contemporaries (think WWII and Cold War), I'd say the Hi Power acquitted itself very well. It was the choice of more countries than any of the others. It lasted longer in service than all but the 1911 (perhaps a tie there, I'd have to do the math). There's more Hi Powers still in service around the world than any of its contemporaries.

It was designed as a military pistol, period. It served in that role with great distinction.
 

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If Springfield brings back the Hi Power it will probably be something like this:

 

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No. The High Power is not obsolete either. Not gonna say the CZ75 is superior to the High Power, but it surely is a worthy alternate choice. I have examples of all three and like both pistols better than I do the P38, but have more experience shooting them than I do the P38.

If someone must view a handgun as either "tactical" or not then he might not know a "tactical pistol" if he was to drop one on his big toe.
 

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If Springfield brings back the Hi Power it will probably be something like this:

At one time Springfield Inc offered a CZ-75 clone using raw parts from Tanfoglio. Didn't sell too well.
 

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For military and LE, it's obsolete, just as single-action revolvers are, but not for gun nuts who appreciate them. Like some other posters, I prefer the CZ75. I used to own 3 Hi Powers (one Browning, one FM, one FEG) but sold all of them.
 
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