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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking at picking up a used M-1 Garand. They (CMP) have Springfields in better shape for less money, or Winchesters for more money, but not as good of condition.

Just wondering what the difference is between the two makes and if it's worth $100 for the Winchester that's in not as good of condition? (actually is the Springfield OK for $100 less?)

Just want it for the history of the weapon, for plinking, and for parades/honor guard type of stuff.

Thanks
 

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Winchester lagged way behind Springfield in updating their guns when design improvements were made. The guns that Winchester was making at the end of their run apparently didn't have a lot of the updates that Springfield had instituted a couple of years earlier - look at a Springfield part that has a -5 part number, and a Winchester part from the same time period might be a -2; three updates behind. The Winchester name has a lot of cache with collectors, but Springfield made better guns.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Sounds good. I'm not looking for a collector showpiece, so it doesn't matter if it's more rare or not. I just want something that's a good piece, so it sounds like I'm more than OK with the SA Garand.
Thanks,
:}
 

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My Garand has a '43 Winchester receiver and a '45 Springfield barrel. Where does that leave me? :scratch:
 

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I believe Winchesters manufacturing of the M-1 was limited to WWII. So they would be rarer. Winchester used a forged trigger guard, while the Spingers is stamped.
 

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My Garand has a '43 Winchester receiver and a '45 Springfield barrel. Where does that leave me? :scratch:
It means that your rifle most likely saw some action. I have a '43 SA with a '45 barrel and stock. At the end of the war a program was started to keep the unit armorers busy. They started rebuilding the rifles in the field. After the war ended, the rifles were brought home and rebuilt here. Those rifles had their stocks were marked accordingly.
 

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As others have stated, the SA (especially post-WW2) are much more refined than the Winchesters. However, I have a '42 SA that isn't much better looking than my Winchester as far as the smooth surface finish of the receiver is concerned. As for function, all four makes that I own function very well. Without taking into account the historical aspect involved, I'd be hard pressed to choose between them if I were only able to keep one.

The fact is, you probably need both :) and the Winchester will likely be harder to obtain down the road. I would pick up the Winchester now and save up for the SA as quick as possible.

 

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nice assortment azimuth

and I agree for the most part. If you spend the extra money on the Winchester now, you could pick up any SA down the road that is to your liking. If you order an SA from the CMP, you cannot really "pick" which one you get...so if it matters to you to be a WWII production rifle, the WRA is the way to go. You may get lucky with a CMP SA pick, but I have seen a lot of post war rifles coming from them lately. If you're not worried about the production history and just want one shooter type rifle, I'd get the SA and some ammo.

WARNING/DISCLAIMER: Don't plan on owning just one...
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all the replies, it definitely helps to make more sense of what is out there. Unfortunately, with the way the economy is looking (mine and the govt's), I don't know if I can afford one right now anyway, but now at least I know what's what so that when I figure out I can afford one I know which one to get.
 

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My Garand has a '43 Winchester receiver also. I put a little extra value in the Winchester name. Shoots like a house of fire!
 
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