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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looked at a GI Colt today, had (2) two tone mags in a gi holster, gun was a colt from 1942 according to the reference material, had all the patent dates on the slide, slide was two tone from front 3rd on...refurb maybe??, plastic stocks, lanyard loop, lot of edege wear but finish was 75-80%, just wondering what the desirability would be, I'm looking for a Gi Friend for my TRP-PRO
 

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The two-tone look on the slide is due to the fact that Colt heat-treated the front end of the slide, and as a result the metal takes on a different hue there. I have an old 1933-vintage Colt that I removed the old finish with the idea of having it refinished, and the two-tone effect is present even on the bare metal.

Look at a couple things: First, have someone remove the firing pin stop plate at the rear of the slide and look at the serial number there. It should match the one on the frame. Second, the gun should have all machined and checkered parts like the trigger, wide-spur hammer, mainspring housing, etc. Third, the finish should be a greenish-grey Parkerizing, matching on the slide and frame but possibly darker on the small parts. If these check out then the gun is liklely original and definitely a collectible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks for the reply, all of the stuff you said is present, i will check the firing pin stop ser#, the gun is up here in Canada and very few of these guns were refinished or worked on, if I can get this one for $400.00 or so dollars I'll get it
 

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For $400 US Dollars it's a steal even if it WAS refinished! Unfortunately here in the USA original GI 1911s are priced astronomically high.

The serial number I mentioned is stamped on the slide itself, behind the stop plate. You should see half the numbers above the firing pin hole and the other half below it.
 

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I would ask to dissasemble the gun. And then leave it dissasembled. And tell them you'll be back later to reassemble.
 

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Actually, it would be somewhat surprising if the slide serial number matched the frame number, wouldn't it? A weapon that might have been in military service for thirty or more years, disassembled and reassembled countless times? Can anyone comment on how often these early-war guns still have matching slide and frame? My slide is three digits off.
 

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Very true RickB, I have gotten word that the armorers would bring in GIs. With little to no firearms experience. Have them disassemble-clean-assemble a quantity of 1911s and other type guns in the military arsenal. And being many were apart at the same time and, boys like to play around. Sometimes parts got switched inadvertently.
 

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[This message has been edited by Gonzo308 (edited 04-21-2001).]
 
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