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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I go shooting with my Kimber Ultra Crimson, I am on with the regular iron sights, but when I use the laser alone, I always pull the shots waaayyyy down. Does anyone else have this issue?

I know I need to practice dryfire shooting, but why would one method of shooting be far worse than the other?
 

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Your laser sight should be adjustable for elevation (and windage). Forget dry firing for a few minutes. When the iron sights are on a target does the laser coincide with the iron sight aiming point? If not, adjust the laser.
 

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Your laser sight should be adjustable for elevation (and windage). Forget dry firing for a few minutes. When the iron sights are on a target does the laser coincide with the iron sight aiming point? If not, adjust the laser.
ditto, but measure how far right the laser is from the bore, make sure it stays off by that much, otherwise if you get a closer target laser goes right and if the target is farther away laser goes left, this way its consistently 1" or so right. adjust elevation however you see fit as long as its right somewhere. I say make the laser a little lower so it doesn't mess up your sight picture but thats just me (as in on at 25 yards)
 

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Most likely you are doing what I call chasing the laser. I did the same thing with my CT grips for a while. I was watching the laser and trying to keep it on target throughout an entire string. I would then start anticipating the recoil and push the gun down trying to keep the laser on target. It took me a while to get used to letting the pistol recoil normally and then bringing the dot back on target quickly. Once I did, my accuracy returned along with the speed I gained with the dot.

I hope this helps. While I like my CTs, I still only have them on one pistol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Your laser sight should be adjustable for elevation (and windage). Forget dry firing for a few minutes. When the iron sights are on a target does the laser coincide with the iron sight aiming point? If not, adjust the laser.
The laser is right on. I give it to my dad, who is a dead eye, and he can hit the Bull's Eye, so I know it is me and not the gun (as usual).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Most likely you are doing what I call chasing the laser. I did the same thing with my CT grips for a while. I was watching the laser and trying to keep it on target throughout an entire string. I would then start anticipating the recoil and push the gun down trying to keep the laser on target. It took me a while to get used to letting the pistol recoil normally and then bringing the dot back on target quickly. Once I did, my accuracy returned along with the speed I gained with the dot.

I hope this helps. While I like my CTs, I still only have them on one pistol.
What are some things you did to overcome this? I really am frustrated, as one would think the laser would make for no-brainer shooting. I would like to get to the point where the laser is as accurate as the iron sights, but I am not even close to being there now.
 

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I have seen this issue with other shooters that use the laser and as you said, they were also shooting low. Dry fire is a great way, and cheap, to get use to pulling the trigger while watching the laser and making sure it does not move. When you focus on the dot use the same process as focusing on the front sight. Nice easy pressure on the trigger while telling yourself to watch the dot. The gun should go off as a surprise not command detonate.

Hope this helps and is not just bla bla bla.


Semper Fi
1*
 

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What are some things you did to overcome this? I really am frustrated, as one would think the laser would make for no-brainer shooting. I would like to get to the point where the laser is as accurate as the iron sights, but I am not even close to being there now.
I really had to slow down and make sure I was focusing on the fundamentals and allowing the pistol to recoil naturally. I also threw in some dummy rounds into the magazines so I could catch myself pushing down. One day it just kind of seemed to come together for me and I have not had those problems ever since. I still throw in the dummy rounds from time to time to keep myself honest.
 

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When I go shooting with my Kimber Ultra Crimson, I am on with the regular iron sights, but when I use the laser alone, I always pull the shots waaayyyy down. Does anyone else have this issue?

I know I need to practice dryfire shooting, but why would one method of shooting be far worse than the other?
Because the normal movement of your hand, which is seen as negligible looking at the iron sights, is greatly magnified by the laser. I'm guessing that you are forcing the shot (yanking the trigger) when the laser is centered on the target. Dryfire is a good training exercise for this problem. Simply point the gun at a blank wall and mash the trigger in a single, increasing pressure motion. If the laser dot moves abruptly, you have jerked the trigger. If there is no change in the normal movement, then you have done it right.
 
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