1911Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My dad gave me his .45 from WWII a few years ago. It was made by Ithaca, serial number 1861XXX. It is in very good condition, has only been shot 3 times since 1946, twice by me. A bit of the parkerizing is coming off some of the edges but that's about it. The parkerizing on the frame and slide match. It has a P in front of the rear site and a P below the magazine release button. The initials FJA (The A might not be correct, it is very light) are below the slide stop. There is a circular stamp on the right side of the frame (or slide?, don't have it with me here at the office). The circular stamp is fairly light, looks like some kind of design or logo inside the circle.

The only other marking are U.S. Army 1911A1 and U.S. Government Property.

I e-mailed Ithaca about it to get more info., got a short reply that said the guns were made under a war contract from 1942-46 and it was worth $900. That's hard to believe from what I saw on this site, Ithaca's appear to be quite common.

One last thing to mention that probably destroyed any value it may have had. About 20+ years ago, many police departments were advising people to put their S.S.# on their TVs, stereos, other valuables, etc. to aid in identification in case they were stolen.
You guessed it! My dad used an etching tool to put his S.S. # on the grip (on the steel, not the walnut(?) grip panels).

Any help would be appreciated.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
74,721 Posts
Everything sounds okay. Value for an Ithaca with 95% finish and all correct parts is within the $800-$900 range. Ithacas were made from 1943 through mid 1945. Your gun was made in 1944. However, you are correct that the SS# may reduce value by a couple hundred bucks. In fact, I'd be very hesitant to even sell a gun that had my or a family member's SSN on it!

You can get an idea as to what the stamps all mean by going to my website and looking for the inspector's markings link.
http://usgi1911.tripod.com

------------------
D. Kamm
USGI M1911/M1911A1 Pistols Website
http://usgi1911.tripod.com

[This message has been edited by dsk (edited 11-08-2001).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks so much for the information. I will check out your web site.

I don't intend to sell this pistol for any price. It will be passed down to my son one day. I'm trying to value all my guns for insurance purposes in case the house burns down or they're stolen.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
74,721 Posts
Another thing to check is the barrel and grips. The barrel should be fully blued, and be marked with an HS on one lug and P on the other. A small number were also marked F in place of the HS. The grips should have a K inside a star, along with a one or two digit number on the backside of the grips.

------------------
D. Kamm
USGI M1911/M1911A1 Pistols Website
http://usgi1911.tripod.com
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Everything matched up as you said, took it apart today to check. The barrel is blue, there is a P on one side of the barrel lug and an F on the other. Inside the grips (plastic) there is a star with a K inside and a number 8 on one of them and a 13 on the other.
Checked your website. The logo is an Ordnance Department inspection stamp, and the Ithaca factory proof mark is the arrows that point opposite directions. The FJA is for Frank J. Atwood.
Thanks for your great website and assistance!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,344 Posts
Sounds like you have a nice gun to pass down one day.
The F on the barrel lug indicates it was made by Flannery Bolt. They primarily made replacement barrels during WWII. However, it is noted that some Ithaca pistols in 1944-45 were shipped with them, presumably because they were used to fill in when enough Hi Std.
barrels were not available. Flannery barrels were used in other pistols as fill-ins also.
Would you please look at the bullet feed ramp and report as to whethr it is parkerized or milled off bright. Some Ithaca pistols a little after that serial range had parkerized ramps. Normally, they are milled bright. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I believe it is milled off bright, not sure if that is from wear or that is the way it was. I will check for sure this week, got it locked up in the safe under the stairs, Sunday night, time for bed.

No modifications or gunsmithing on this pistol, sat on a closet shelf for 45 years before my dad gave it to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,344 Posts
Thanks. When you look, it probably will be bare metal and NOT polished smooth. Wear may be present shining the ramp a bit, but you'll be able to see some milling marks where it was cut out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
A question about reassembly. This is the only 1911 I've ever taken apart & I've done it about 4-5 times. No problems taking it apart but I always have trouble getting the slide stop back in. It usually takes me 15 minutes of fumbling around to get it back in and it eventually pops in but I'm left wondering how I did it & angry about a few small scratches I put on it try to get it in.

When I disassembled it yesterday, the slide stop came right out when it aligned with the little semi-circle on the slide. When I try to put it back in at the same spot, it only goes in halfway. It appeared yesterday that when I got it halfway in & pulled the slide back some, it went in all the way. Is this the trick? At what point does it go in all the way? Thanks in advance.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
74,721 Posts
It takes practice. I have never scratched my guns, but only because I've got it down to an art. Most folks take time to learn the trick, which is why so many 1911s have slide stop scratches. The only thing I can say is that you have to get the slide stop and the hole perfectly lined up, and the stop plunger resting on the little nub. Then you push sraight in until it snaps in place, making sure not to apply any up or down pressure that might allow the slide stop to get out from under you and make the scratch.

The frame scratch is comparatively minor. The REAL beauty mark is made when the slide stop travels upward and dances across the slide, leaving a nice crescent-shaped scratch.

------------------
D. Kamm
USGI M1911/M1911A1 Pistols Website
http://usgi1911.tripod.com
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Scott,

Looked at it today, the feed ramp is not parkerized, milled off bright.
BTW, I've also got the original holster for it, the kind made to clip on a military belt & leather straps to tie it around your leg. It has "U.S." inside an oval circle and on the opposite side, it is stamped "Fink 1944". Don't know if "Fink" was original owner of the holster (why would someone put the year on it?) or I guess more probably, the manufacturer or inspector, those would make more sense with the year stamped on it.
Thanks to all for your helpful information.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top