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Hello All!

A couple of days ago, I attended a reloading class.

I got to reload some of the brass I had. I used Speer 185 gr SWC-TMJ Match (part #4473).

I reloaded 3.9 gr of Bullseye using Winchester Primers.

When I tried them out in my predator, most of them jammed (stovepipe), didn't chamber properly and were ejected towards the front of the pistol, not the back.

What can be the problem? Not enough power to cycle the action properly? Improper size (they fit in a case measuring device).

Then I shot 200gr LSWC, with the same recipe and they shot fine.
 

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The nose shapes look the same, I presume you were loading to the same OAL.

Too light a load. 4 gr Bull and a 200 gr bullet are a light load. Anything less and you need to start reducing the recoil spring.
 

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Hello All!

A couple of days ago, I attended a reloading class.

I got to reload some of the brass I had. I used Speer 185 gr SWC-TMJ Match (part #4473).

I reloaded 3.9 gr of Bullseye using Winchester Primers.

When I tried them out in my predator, most of them jammed (stovepipe), didn't chamber properly and were ejected towards the front of the pistol, not the back.

What can be the problem? Not enough power to cycle the action properly? Improper size (they fit in a case measuring device).

Then I shot 200gr LSWC, with the same recipe and they shot fine.
The jacketed bullet needs more pressure; start with 4.5 of Bullseye.
 

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Jacketed and lead bullets for reloading

As Richard Ashmore said in his reply, jacketed bullets need more powder when compared to using the same style and weight of lead bullets. The base of lead bullets expand and fill out the rifling much quicker than a jacketed bullet, and the pressure is greater. A FMJ actually does not seal the gases as quickly, so pressure is lost. It generally requires more powder to achieve the same pressure and velocity when using FMJ vs. lead bullets.

When a brass case is ejected forward, it usually means the fired case is being hit by the returning slide, so the slide is most likely short stroking and not cycling all the way to the rear of the frame. Since the slide is not cycling all the way back, the fired case never hits the ejector, and usually, a stovepipe jam occurs. Light loads require lighter springs, which can be adjusted by a combination of a lighter mainspring and recoil spring.
 

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If you have a lot of these rounds..I would suggest using a lighter recoil spring..to at least burn up those rounds. Load a little heavier and put the normal recoil spring back in.
 

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I've used 3.6 grains of Bullseye with a 230 grain fmj, 200 grain lswc, and a 185 grain lswc. All functioned perfectly with a 16# spring. That said, your gun could make the difference.
 
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