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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Two questions really.

After Mr. Brownings work was essentially completed o the 1911, what was the next gun he was to design?

Also, is there any one individual that could be credited with designing the first Officer size 1911, or was it a corporate project?
I'm guessing the engineers at Colt, but that just a guess....
 

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Actually it was the Remmington Model 17 Shotgun followed by
Remmington semi auto Model 24 rifle
followed in 1917 with the 4 below
M-1917 heavy 30 cal machine gun
BAR
50 cal water cooled machine gun (M-1921) (daddy of MA deuce) Unveiled
30 cal air cooled machine gun (M-1919) unveiled
 

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There others along the way....

Two questions really.

After Mr. Brownings work was essentially completed o the 1911, what was the next gun he was to design?

Also, is there any one individual that could be credited with designing the first Officer size 1911, or was it a corporate project?
I'm guessing the engineers at Colt, but that just a guess....
Austin Behlert was one Gun Smith that "Cut Down" a GM to what we now call an Officer's Model. George Sheldon (Florida) also turned out Cut Down 1911s prior to the commercial appearance of the Officer's Model. IMO, these early modifications were the platform that the current Officer's model was based on. Armand Swenson also was involved, but, most of my interaction was with Austin.

This is based on what I remember from the late 70s and early 80s.
 

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Technically the water-cooled 1918 beat the air-cooled 1919
The water-cooled machine gun is the M1917. His next design was the M1918, known as the Browning Automatic Rifle. The M1919 medium (air cooled) machine gun was third in the series, and at the request of General Pershing after the war he designed the gun and cartridge we know today as the .50 caliber M2 HB Browning Machine Gun.

When I was in the 30th Infantry at Fort Sill, back in the Stone Age, we caught all kinds of details, including running the post Infiltration Course (where troops crawl through obstacles with machine guns firing overhead.) Because the M60 was not certified for overhead fire in training, we had six M1917s. Those were great guns!
 
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