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First thing I noticed was near-uniform tearing downward, no tumble effect. No doubt thin paper caused this.
Have fun with your Springer.
 

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Everyone is obviously correct - it is not keyholing.

But the easiest way to see/know this, is that the actual bullet hole shows the powder/jacket residue in a nice circle. If they were keyholing, you'd see the same residue around the ripped area, as well.
 

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Nope it is the paper you're hitting the target too much for a keyhole. I have had the thin ones tear just like that. Now I only use a dirty bird style of target a bit pricy but they are 81/2 x 11 makes it a better challenge.
 

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Looks like the paper was tearing to me. I can see the round hole the bullet made . I don't think you have anything to worry about. I do not see anything that made me think a bullet was sideways when it hit the target.
Exactly..The bullet left a nice,round mark.If it was keyholing,the burn pattern would be shaped like a side bullet profile.No keyhole there..I don't think I've ever seen a 1911 keyhole..
 

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Totally +1 with the others. I spent a couple of years as a Range Safety Officer working part-time after I retired from law enforcement. On the range I saw the same exact holes in targets and often got the same queries. If your range permits, take some cardboard backing, or spend the money for an IPSC or other cardboard sillouette target, and staple your paper target to the backing. My guess is the "keyholing" will go away. Most ranges have the shooter hang the target from a frame using binder clips or some other device at the top only while leaving the bottom of the target "blowing in the breeze" -- and bullets make a small but violent breeze when moving downrange. It's cheaper and quicker that way and most casual shooters just want to see any kind of hole anywhere on the paper in the area of 10 ring when they drop the hammer. Take your keyholed target and look at it on edge. The cause will be readily apparent. Bullets don't blow a neat, round hole through paper like a hole punch -- unless the target is backed up by a solid surface like a piece of cardboard and the shooter is using wadcutter or semi-wadcutter profile bullets. If the target hangs free, the bullet will impact the surface of the paper,and a millisecond later, tear through the surface of the paper at an angle as it swings away from the path of the bullet, the bullet actually passing through at an angle -- hence, keyhole-shaped holes. And at closer inspection, they are not actually keholes but a hole and a tear caused when the paper tried to "move out of the way" when struck by the bullet, shockwave preceding it, and wind (atmospheric disturbance) following it.
 

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As everybody stated.. the paper is the problem (and lack of backing).
Cheap printing paper has long fibers and doesn´t cut well..

As I have a free supply of papertargets from my club, I only shoot competition grade paper.. that is a special shortfiber paper, pretty thick as well. Every caliber prints nice holes, Flatnose/wadcutter/semiwads cuts the best and pointy fmjs has some short starpattern tears to them but are easy to score and even the slightest keyholeing is easy to spot.
 

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Just to repeat what others said, but with an illustration, the soot on a bullet from blowby and muzzle blast makes a good marker, especially with lower velocity rounds. Below is one of your holes on the left and something more like I'd expect from a 90° keyhole on the right. Actual keyholes can come in all angles from straight ahead to completely backward and everywhere inbetween, at at short ranges you more often get ovals than full-on keyholes. But I don't see any of those, either.



One diagnostic tool would be to try shooting the same target from 50 yards to see if the holes themselves look any different. That's enough range to get at least some full sideways holes and for bullets to start to veer off-course substantially if you were getting any tumbling. But I'm confident you aren't.
 

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But the easiest way to see/know this, is that the actual bullet hole shows the powder/jacket residue in a nice circle. If they were keyholing, you'd see the same residue around the ripped area, as well.
Shane45 hit the nail on the head for future reference. If the torn portions are still attached to the target, flatten them back into position and take note of the actual bullet imprint. Keyholes will not be nice and round but oblong. A lot of times they look exactly like the side view of the bullet.
 

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No keyholing here, my friend. I've seen the real thing, and it looks nothing like this. You can see a nice, neat round hole where the bullet struck, including the dark ring left by the bullet in passing through the paper. With no backer you'll get some tearing of the paper.

With real keyholing, you'll get an oblong hole in the target, sometimes even a perfect profile of the bullet if it hits just right. Accuracy will be greatly affected as well. We had a batch of one manufacturer's 9mm a couple of years ago that was quite bad. The lead core was not centered inside the copper jacket, so the bullet wobbled downrange in its trajectory. The interesting thing was that the problem was inconsistent. You might have just a couple of rounds in a box of 50 that were bad or sometimes almost the whole box. Trying to shoot a ragged hole from just 5m was futile. You never knew where the hits would go, and they were mostly oblong-shaped. We learned of two lot #s from that manufacturer that were problematic and returned everything we had with those lots. The rest were fine. And so is your gun, BTW.
 

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Oldtimer4440

I have owned guns that key holed. Try moving you targets farther away with backing. A true key holing gun will spread the shot group because of the instability of the projectile. From looking at your targets they look more like tears from unsupported paper targets.
As to the gentleman that called your attention to the problem being a LEO, I can say that as an armor for a large PD for two years, you wouldn't believe the ineptness of many police officers with weapons. I had to regularly give classes as to how to unload different types of weapons. This after an officer killed his car trying to unload a semi auto shotgun. Incidentally, most police officers are notoriously poor shots, and only fire for qualification when forced to. Not saying this was the case with the officer that you talked to, but I would check a lot farther before writing off the barrel as flawed.
 

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Was this thin paper hung from the top and hanging free to move in the breeze ? I have seen this exact same ripping in paper targets hung by just the top corners and left hanging in the breeze to move around.
You do NOT have a key hole problem but if you think you do you could always just ship the pistol off to me and I'll shoot it until it stops ..lol
 

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YES--it IS keyholing!! Looks like it's done, for your trouble I'll give ya 250 for the parts...

Nah..You're good sir, just use thicker backers (if you used any at all)...I've done the same thing before; when I just stapled the target itself to a frame and fired slow reloads...
 
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