1911Forum banner

1 - 20 of 42 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
318 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I have a Custom Carry II circa 2009. Love the gun. However, after about 100 rounds (factory ammo) the gun will start having problems feeding. Specifically it will fail to go into battery. The round will drop into the chamber but the slide won't quite close. A small tap is all it takes to close. Not every round, maybe one or two per mag, all the mags seem to do it. So what's the fix? More lube? Less lube? New spring (the round count is prob around 3-3500)? Break it down and clean it at the range?

Thanks for any input!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
360 Posts
When it gets to that point which requires a rap on the back of slide to get it into battery; then try to unload. Remove mag and retract slide. Does it take more force than should be required? Can it be done pretty effortlessly. Does it require you to hold the slide and rap the back strap to extract the Unexpended round?

Look at the projectile once removed. Do you see marks.

Look at the rims of your fired brass. Do you see displaced brass leaving an burrs?

What I have learned mostly from Log man is that a) Kimbers tend to have short leades that do cause failure to return to battery especially after being fired a bit. And b) the extractor needs more radius at the bottom and the breechface to inner claw gap should be .075. I have measured over a dozen Kimber 45s and they are all .069.

I used a finish reamer with gauges and increase the leade as well as. Correct the extractor gap on them all now and they run great with all ammo. The rim thicknesses vary somewhat I have found.

I would resist the urge to increase the recoil to 18 lbs or more to correct the problem. It makes the gun more dependent on more powerful ammo to eject cleanly and on the shooters technique to support function. It is just a crutch to force the round in, under and through problems that need addressed. These stiffer springs are also harder on the slide stop pin when the barrel lugs crash into it.

Maybe Log will check in with better advise and correct me on this. But this has worked on several Kimbers I have addressed for guys at work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
318 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
@mike thanks for all the feedback. The rounds don't have any marks on them and the gun doesn't take any extra force to eject. It will almost go into battery. I think the spring will take care of it... It really prob has close to 5k on it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
360 Posts
I would be insterested to know the pound strength of a 16 lb spring after 2000-3000 rounds. It should not take 16 lbs to feed chamber and lock. Gold cups come with 12s if I recall. I use a 12 to cycle a mag through check for points that may be causing hesitation and need addressed. Changing your spring may indeed solve the issue I just wanted to mention common issues I have found with Kimbers. I have been know to runs pistol thousands of rounds without cleaning. And without issue.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,220 Posts
Gold Cups come with a 12lb AND a 16lb spring. The light spring is for light target load SWC's while the 16lb spring is for "regular" 45 cal. loads.

Here is what Wolff says about changing recoil springs. They seem to know something about springs.

4. How often should I change my springs?
The performance of your gun is the best indicator of when a spring needs to be replaced. Factors such as increased ejection distance, improper ejection and/or breeching, lighter hammer indents on primers, misfires, poor cartridge feeding from magazines, frequent jams, stove pipes and other malfunctions are all possible indications of fatigued springs or improper springs.

Springs such as magazine springs, striker springs and recoil springs are subjected to higher stress levels and will require more frequent replacement than other lower stressed springs such as firing pin springs and hammer springs.

Wolff springs are made with the highest grade materials and workmanship. Most Wolff [recoil] springs will remain stable for many thousands of rounds. Some recoil springs in compact pistols, especially where dual springs are used or are replaced by a single spring may require changing after 500 - 1500 rounds. Springs that become rusty, bent or otherwise damaged should always be replaced. Again, changes you observe in your firearm's performance are the best indicators that a change is needed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
360 Posts
Yes I understand that and know about matching spring to loads. Not talking about shooting full power loads with 12 lb springs. I look at it as recoil and counter recoil. Once recoil is over the act of overcoming the disconnector, stripping the top round from mag, feeding, chambering and locking should not require more than a 12 lbs spring to complete this smoothly regardless of the power factor of the round.

I use it as a means of finding problems. My point was simply that too many people up their recoil spring to force the gun back into battery rather than to fix the real problem. Maybe I was not clear and hopefully you understand my point now.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,430 Posts
Order directly from Wolff and you'll get a free firing pin spring. Get several sets since the shipping is the same.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
318 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Update....

So I replaced the recoil spring with a Wolfe 16.5# spring. The 100-150 rounds where great. Then it started to fail to go into battery again... As it got dirtier it happened more and more. Maybe I will just wipe it down and lube it after 100 or so and see how that helps. Thoughts? Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,420 Posts
So I replaced the recoil spring with a Wolfe 16.5# spring. The 100-150 rounds where great. Then it started to fail to go into battery again... As it got dirtier it happened more and more. Maybe I will just wipe it down and lube it after 100 or so and see how that helps. Thoughts? Thanks
Some ammo's burn much dirtier than others, but even with clean-burning ammo I'll bet your gun is going to be real dirty after 100 rounds. If there is any flaw in your system (e. g., weak mag springs) you are likely to get failures at that point.

I do two things (one of which is not recommended but I have been doing it for several decades and know it helps.) First, every 75 - 100 rounds, and you don't even have to take the slide off for this, with the gun locked open and the mag out reach in with an oily rag and wipe your feed ramp, chamber opening, breach face and mag channel areas as clean as you can. (Takes about 10 seconds in between mag changes.) Second, I wipe down all my bullets with an oily rag before I shoot them (sometimes years before I shoot them). Doing those 2 things keeps my 1911's (including my C-II) operating flawlessly for a LONG time. I don't know how long because I usually run out of money after a few hundred rounds, but a lot longer than you are getting, for sure. There is nothing like a clean, lightly oiled bullet hitting a clean, lightly oiled feed ramp to ensure rounds going into battery!

Now, a bunch of people will tell you that wiping your bullets risks wetting your primers and/or impairing extraction, but neither of those things has ever happened to me. My suggestion? Ignore them and TRY IT, and tell us what happened. Without any other changes I'll bet you can get to at least 500 rounds BF.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,220 Posts
Actually what a "bunch of people" will tell you is to not oil ammo. Oil is a attractant of dirt. This is a good way to build up crud in your magazines and chamber.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,704 Posts
Update....

So I replaced the recoil spring with a Wolfe 16.5# spring. The 100-150 rounds where great. Then it started to fail to go into battery again... As it got dirtier it happened more and more. Maybe I will just wipe it down and lube it after 100 or so and see how that helps. Thoughts? Thanks
My Pro Carry and LB Stinger did the same thing for the first 400 rounds or so. I just had to add a few drops of lube every hundred rounds to the rails and wipe off the feed ramp. After break in it was fine. I'd just run it wet for the next few hundred rounds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
318 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I do have lots of rounds on the gun but the new spring has 330 rounds on it... I think a quick wipe down with a tad lube after a 100 or so might help... We try and report back. Thanks guys.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,704 Posts
^ he said he has over 3k rounds through this firearm. I don't think his problem is normal.
Missed that. Agree that something isn't quite right for it to happen after break in. Even dirty ammo shouldn't gum up at 100 rounds unless it doesn't have enough lube on the rails.
 
1 - 20 of 42 Posts
Top