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If Kimber made a High Power would you purchase one? All the extras they would have as standard would make this a must buy for me...any thoughts?
 

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norman74 said:
and the firing pin safety.
The HP has a firing pin safety which is the only one on earth that adds no parts and does no harm. They opened up an area in the slide next to the sear lever exposing the FP. The newer sear levers have a projection that rests against the firing pin (holding against a machined lip on it) which is a foolproof FP block when ever the trigger is not pulled and the sear lever is at rest. Pulling the trigger moves the sear lever out of the way. No extra parts, levers, or springs added to the original design.
 

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bountyhunter said:
The HP has a firing pin safety which is the only one on earth that adds no parts and does no harm. They opened up an area in the slide next to the sear lever exposing the FP. The newer sear levers have a projection that rests against the firing pin (holding against a machined lip on it) which is a foolproof FP block when ever the trigger is not pulled and the sear lever is at rest. Pulling the trigger moves the sear lever out of the way. No extra parts, levers, or springs added to the original design.
Wow, I had no idea. I've never owned a HP, or really had one apart. thanks for sharing, learn something new every day.
 

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I would buy one. I think kimber should start a new trend and make a hi-power with all the custom goodies from the factory.
That would be a good excuss for buying more handguns
:-D
 

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There's a problem: the HI=power has some strong points (reliable design, few parts) but it has one of the worst triggers on any single action gun ever made. Gunsmiths have been sending their kids to college doing trigger jobs on them for years, and the problem is inherent in the design. The HP needs a very precise primary cut angle and relief cut angle on the sear to have a decent trigger. That also means a very small contact area and HP trigger jobs "disappear" pretty fast and they develop the old familiar hammer follow. To get a very good (and durable) trigger usually means dumping the stock parts and installing an aftermarket sear/hammer set which has a much higher hardness than the original.

I don't think Kimber would make a HP, at least not one that uses the original design. The reason is that anybody who is used to shooting 1911 triggers would thing the gun was defective and send it back (seriously). Many new HP's come stock with trigger pulls above 8 pounds and creep that is like fingernails on a chalkboard.
 

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If Kimber made a HP I'd have one tomorrow. That would be just the reason I've been looking for to buy one. And if they made a compact I'd have 2 or 3.

I can see my new PRO-Carry HP already



Train hard, Train often, and Be safe.:D
 

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Bountyhunter,
1911's were generaly lame when they came from the Factory -= people had to send them to smiths to get all the issues ironed out. Until kimber raised the bar.
If kimber made hipowers- they would ship them with already tunned triggers.
 

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pinheadbob2002 said:
Bountyhunter,
1911's were generaly lame when they came from the Factory -= people had to send them to smiths to get all the issues ironed out. Until kimber raised the bar.
If kimber made hipowers- they would ship them with already tunned triggers.
OK, then they will cost about $1500.
 

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The trigger on the Hi-Power is awful. I have one and I replaced the trigger and also replced the springs with Cylinder and Slide parts to get a lighter trigger pull. It still is not very good. The trigger has alot of over travel. I called Cylinder and Slide to ask if they could do something about it and they said they could probably help the trigger pull but that the over travel is just part of the design of the gun and there is not much you can do about it. I never noticed the over travel when I was looking at the gun before I bought it most likely because of the magazine safety. Anyway the trigger on the Hi-Power is not even close to the 1911's.
 

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bountyhunter said:
The HP has a firing pin safety which is the only one on earth that adds no parts and does no harm. They opened up an area in the slide next to the sear lever exposing the FP. The newer sear levers have a projection that rests against the firing pin (holding against a machined lip on it) which is a foolproof FP block when ever the trigger is not pulled and the sear lever is at rest. Pulling the trigger moves the sear lever out of the way. No extra parts, levers, or springs added to the original design.
There IS a spring added to the design and the firing pin "safety" DOES do harm.

The problem with the Mark III design is that your trigger reset isn't instant like it is on the Mark II design. You reset but then you have slack to take up as you overcome the additional spring that holds the rear of the sear lever up against the firing pin.

There is no mystique to a hi-power trigger job...no more than is with a 1911. It's just that fewer people have an interest in hi-powers and fewer gunsmiths know how to work on them effectively.

People in these days of CNC-machined parts tend to forget that old 1911s didn't always have the best of triggers or the best fitting out there. If someone would just come out with a hi-power manufactured to better tolerances and with just a few modifications to the trigger system, they'd be perfect.

Alterations?
1. Lighter hammer spring
2. No Mark III firing pin block
3. More "meat" on the little nub that protrudes from the front of the trigger up in the frame to prevent overtravel
4. Stronger trigger return spring than is on the Mark III hi-powers (like the older hi-powers or just the Wolff extra-power trigger return spring)
5. Never seen a problem with the hardness of the factory hammer and sear (and most hi-power gunsmiths haven't, either) but they could be replaced with other parts. If the entire gun was manufactured to tighter tolerances then the hammer and sear interface could be altered as a factory part and you could have a trigger that was good from the factory
6. No magazine disconnect
7. Oh..forgot...go ahead and have the pivot point for the sear lever in the same place as is used for the GP Competition and how it is done for the C&S improved sear lever so that you have more mechanical advantage

Those are the things that most gunsmiths will do to a hi-power to get a better trigger. There's no mystique at all, just a little more work. There's nothing on that list that couldn't be done from the factory.
 
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