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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After lurking here for some time and browsing the wealth of information, I finally decided on purchasing a Kimber STS Gold Match. I just got back from its first range trip and am extremely happy with it.

The only problem I had and it only happened once was after firing a round, a second round went off about 1/2 a second later and before I was ready. I'm sure it was operator error due to my inexperience with such a light trigger and short trigger release travel, but it caught me by surprise. After that I made an effort to hold the trigger back during the full cycle, and then release when I was back on target which corrected the issue.

My only concern now is that I feel like I am milking the trigger to maintain pressure on it and losing some of the surprise needed for a good shot. Any suggestions out there?, I realize one range trip doesn't give you all the answers and it takes a while to get used to a new gun, so I'll keep at it.

BTW, thanks to everyone who posts here, making it an invaluable source of information.
 

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Congrat's, the Gold Match can be a nice weapon.

It will take time to become proficient with the 1911 Trigger for a novice, or one unfamiliar.

Also, Trigger use is typically different than most are used to.

For a Revolver, or other type of DA, or puedo DA type trigger, you would tend to have the first joint on the trigger, and would pull it.

With the 1911, you actually should use the pad between the first joint and tip of the finger, and press the trigger back smoothly.

Most pivoting triggers don't respond well with this technique, though for the sliding style of the 1911, it's perfect.

The suprise "Double" is indictive of the need for more Range time with the new type, and you may wish to refrain from Concealed Carry of a 1911 until you feel more comfortable with it.

Enjoy, and there is no substitute for rounds expended.
 

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I too had a problem milking the trigger when I started shooting a 1911. Two things that helped me eliminate this problem were to put my thumb on top of the saftey instead of under it. It felt awkward at first, but after a short time it felt perfectly natural. It helped me to not put a death grip on the gun as I was squeezing the trigger.

The second thing I did was to use the pad of my finger instead of the first joint. For some reason using that first knukle seems to make you want to really crank down on that trigger. Using just the pad of your finger will help you use a lite touch.

Once I incorporated those technics, my accurracy improved significantly.
 

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Ok, no offense here...but I'm totally confused and you guys are scaring me! I have been shooting firearms since I was 8 years old (a .30-06 was my first...thanks dad
)and I have never used anything BUT the pad of my finger on the trigger. I also do not "pull" the trigger (regardless if it's Double Action, Double Action/Safe Action, Single Action, 1911...whatever!)...it should be "squeezed" with adequate pressure until fired...therefore your shot is never expected. Anticipated shots will lead to "pulls", usually a drop of the shot in your group = decreased and inconsistent accuracy.
But...MOST IMPORTANTLY...I cannot comprehend this "milking the trigger" concept! Take your finger off the trigger until you are ready to fire before you hurt someone!
That's basic safety guys!
Maybe I am interpreting these posts incorrectly, but I AM a firearms instructor and from what I think your posting, I would really like to know what range y'all shoot at so I can either keep clear or bring an ambulance with me
(I am a full-time Registered Nurse)

mtbeet The Gold Match is an awesome pistol...good choice! I suggest simply slowing down and relaxing...try placing your trigger finger along the frame, under and clear of the slide (as if you were literally pointing at your target) between each shot. This should not only help prevent accidentally shooting someone
but it will steady your firearm and improve your aim. Please hold off on rapid fire sessons for a bit
. Best of luck!

Breathe, Relax, Aim, Squeeze...
 

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Originally posted by Sniper:
Ok, no offense here...but I'm totally confused and you guys are scaring me! I have been shooting firearms since I was 8 years old (a .30-06 was my first...thanks dad
)and I have never used anything BUT the pad of my finger on the trigger. I also do not "pull" the trigger (regardless if it's Double Action, Double Action/Safe Action, Single Action, 1911...whatever!)...it should be "squeezed" with adequate pressure until fired...therefore your shot is never expected. Anticipated shots will lead to "pulls", usually a drop of the shot in your group = decreased and inconsistent accuracy.

Breathe, Relax, Aim, Squeeze...
I think you may be under a slight misunderstanding of the posts...

I too have been a certified Weapon's & Tactic's Trainer and while I do agree with you in principle about the concept of "squeezing" a trigger, to understand the mechanic's of the action, especially with a trigger that pivot's, the more appropriate condition is described as "pulling" to the rear.

Now, while you may have larger finger's, or maybe more strength in your hands than other's, most who grasp a revolver, or similar style trigger, much like my Kahr Polymer will place the joint on the trigger. Believe me, I have tried to use my pad, but the feeling is much different as the angle changes on the trigger face, and the trigger tends to be more controlled at the joint.

That said... With a 1911, the most appropriate term that can describe the action of moving the trigger is to "Press" it to the rear, using the pad.

While the essence of "squeezing" the hand closed (and really, the fore-finger), is, in principle correct, it's not a complete description of the action taking place. More of a 5000 ft view of the process, while the "Pressing of the Trigger" is a more descriptive, lower altitude view.

Milking, not really sure what this is trying to describe.

It is also agreed that one's finger should not be in contact with the trigger until one is ready to actually fire, having followed the previous 3 laws/rules of firearms safety.

You may disagree with my opinion, and that's fine, though many I have trained with/under have also recognized the condition's I have elaborated to, and embraced it as well.

YMMV

[This message has been edited by jaydee (edited 08-31-2001).]
 

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Originally posted by Inspector Harry Callahan:
Ever have a Drill Sergeant scream these words into your left ear?
Screamed... Nahhhh... Just "Whisper" in a civil tone
 

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Perhaps milking the trigger is not the best description. Milking the grip may be more appropriate. As you start to squeeze the trigger, you unconsciously tighten your grip on the gun causing point of aim to drop slightly and to the left (for right shooters). At least this is what I experienced. I corrected this problem by doing as I stated in my post above.

I am not a firearms expert, but I have been shooting / hunting since I was 6 years old and understand the concept of keeping my finger off the trigger until ready to fire. I also understand the concept of squeezing off a shot.

Sniper, your condescending attitude is not warranted nor does it help someone who is asking for legitimate advice. Please excuse our poor use of terminology or lack of ability to explain the situation correctly. I shoot at The Range Pistol club in Fresno California. Feel free to stay clear of our range. The people I meet there are always very friendly and more than willing to go out of their way to help in any way they are able. You might feel out of place there.
 

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I don't have the certs that Sniper has but I totaly agree with him. I also have a new Gold Match and am very happy with. The most accurate pistol I've ever had.
On trigger control I just wanted to add something that helped me tremendously. Imagine that you are pulling your finger towards your shooting eye. This has helped me maintain a sraight pull and also helped me in staying focused on the front sight.
And remember. SQUEEEEEZE! Be safe and have fun!
 

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Originally posted by scarman:
Perhaps milking the trigger is not the best description. Milking the grip may be more appropriate. As you start to squeeze the trigger, you unconsciously tighten your grip on the gun causing point of aim to drop slightly and to the left (for right shooters). At least this is what I experienced. I corrected this problem by doing as I stated in my post above.
This is more appropirately termed "Mashing" the trigger, by many... Milking is a term I have not heard used until now...
 

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Originally posted by DoubleD:
I don't have the certs that Sniper has but I totaly agree with him.....

Imagine that you are pulling your finger towards your shooting eye. This has helped me maintain a sraight pull and also helped me in staying focused on the front sight.
And remember. SQUEEEEEZE! Be safe and have fun!
Okay... Like THIS makes any sense... Pull the trigger towards the eye, but remember to squeeze... ??? Did I miss something?
 

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WOW!
totally NOT what I expected or intended! Gosh, I'm gonna have to explain and possibly defend myself a bit here...

But first, yes...had Breath, Relax, Aim, Squeeze engrained in my head while in the ARMY (Gulf War Veteran) and it is very effective!...I will never forget my BRAS!
 

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jaydee

I think you may be under a slight misunderstanding of the posts...
I believe this was one of the first things I admitted to...


Now, let me introduce myself...I am a 5'4", 125lb FEMALE with hands proportionate to my body frame (meaning...small
).

I absolutely agree with your post. (are my posts being translated into a foreign language? lol). I also agree that a more descriptive and appropriate term would be "press"...a "pull" to me has a whole different meaning, that is why I used "squeeze"...in addition to my BRAS mentality...lol

scarman

Sniper, your condescending attitude is not warranted nor does it help someone who is asking for legitimate advice. Please excuse our poor use of terminology or lack of ability to explain the situation correctly. I shoot at The Range Pistol club in Fresno California. Feel free to stay clear of our range. The people I meet there are always very friendly and more than willing to go out of their way to help in any way they are able. You might feel out of place there.
Whoa! Slow down a minute here! I may tend to put a bit of sarcasm in my posts but in no way was it intended to be condescending or offensive. I sincerely apologize and I am very sorry you viewed it that way. Also, I am guessing (???) that maybe while reading the beginning of my post you were upset and didn't finish reading it...of course I have no idea
But, I felt that I was supportive of mtbeer and offered simplistic, yet sound advice. I, at the very least, intended it to be that way.

Gosh, sorry guys! My first priority with firearms is safety (and I am not saying that anyone else's isn't, please don't get me wrong...again
).

I hope this clear some things up...

"I've got PMS and a .45...was there something you wanted to say?"
 

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No problem Sniper. You are correct that for some reason at first read I took your post as having a negative tone to it. I didn't pay attention to the smilies. I read it a few days later and wondered why I took it that way. Male PMS maybe. My apologies to you. I broke my own rule. Never respond to a post in a negative way unless you've had a day to think about it. Keeps the stresses of the day from spilling over onto your internet friends.

PMS with a .45. Hmmm, maybe I should reconsider getting my wife a gun for Christmas.
 

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WHEW!...glad that's over...thanks for your apology...accepted with gratitude!


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Sniper,

No matter what forum your on you seem to get some of them good ol'boys all worked up. You go girl!!!!!
 

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<><> mtbeer, congrats on your Kimber purchase, and a big WELCOME. Just put a lot of rounds downrange and enjoy your Kimber, The more you shoot it the more you will enjoy it.

Raspy
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks for all the great pointers, after the second range trip I feel much more comfortable with the trigger. Once I stopped treating it like a DA, everything went like clockwork.

Wow, placing my strong thumb on the safety cut my groupings down at least 1/3 and dramatically reduced the muzzle flip! I thought the slide was going to tear into my thumb but it never came close. The thumb does get a little raw after 200 rounds


Thanks again for the tips, now I'm seriously hooked!
 

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Ok...I am just going to disregard the soap opera that went on above and post what I have always understood by the phrase "milking the trigger" and also finger placement on the trigger.

Milking the trigger in my world means that one puts too much of the finger on the trigger (possibly beyond the first bend) and as they squeeze, they slightly pull the gun to the side. This results in the shot going to the side of the slight motion. (Right handed means the shot goes right, left handed means the shot goes left.

(Broken down farmboy style, the "milking" action resembles the twisting action done by a shooter to the grip and finger like the same twisting action of milking a cow's utter)

Scarman said that shot analysis after "milking the trigger" shows low and left for a right handed shooter. I would be more inclined to say that type of shot would be "Anticipation".

Finger placement on the trigger:
I have always put the trigger in the first bend of the trigger finger. I can't squeeze if I try to use the "pad" of the finger! (And I just tried it, too)

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If you don't mind being where you are, you are not lost.
 
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