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So I check out gunbroker, some guy has a Series I Kimber for sale for $850! Can't argue with supply and demand. If this doesn't make Kimber sit up and take notice that nobody acually LIKES this redundant safety, I don't know what will. Some may tolerate the thing, simply because they haven't had any problem with it YET, but does anyone actually LIKE it?

I'm sure this could go in the Kimber forum, but I was hoping for some feedback from more than the cheerleading section.
 

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I'd like to thank all you guys who sold me your early Kimbers! :D
 

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I recently saw an old Clackamas Kimber for under $500 unfortunately I don't have the money right now and I figure that it will sell this week.
 

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No premiums on the pre series IIs around here.....yet!

I have both, just like I have 70 and 80 series Colts.

I don't need, want, or care for the firing pin safeties, but I really wanted the Kimber Target guns in 9mm and 10mm, so whatcha gonna do? :D

If they prove to be keepers, excising the safety isn't terribly difficult......same with the Colts.
 

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I have Clackamas marked Custom Royal on consignment at one of the local toy stores for $800 and it will be worth every dime to the lucky individual that buys it.

I have decided to unload every thing but my colt and custom builts and buy only new or old colts from now on. I find the money spent to customize a colt well spent and then I have exactly what I want, exactly how I want it.
 

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norman74 said:
So I check out gunbroker, some guy has a Series I Kimber for sale for $850! Can't argue with supply and demand. If this doesn't make Kimber sit up and take notice that nobody acually LIKES this redundant safety, I don't know what will. Some may tolerate the thing, simply because they haven't had any problem with it YET, but does anyone actually LIKE it?

I'm sure this could go in the Kimber forum, but I was hoping for some feedback from more than the cheerleading section.
Your synopsis is all fine in theory, but guess what? Kimber could care less. They're doin' their own thing baby, and they're not lookin' back. Us series 1 lovers are on our own.
 

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I picked a Custom Carry up on the net about 9 months ago for $485. Guy said it had one box through it but it didn't look like it.
 

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I was a complete idiot to trade in an early Calackamas Kimber for a new Series II with more bells & whistles. The SII was a total dud, with numerous problems mostly related to the FP safety. As a result I just picked up a NIB Series I Gold Combat Stainless, which after a little tweaking will become my main carry gun. :)
 

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So, a local shop has a series I aluminum compact for $550 OTD. Is that a good deal? I'd say it's about 90%
 

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I don't need an early model more than I need my money....If someone actually pays those ridiculous prices for them, it just proves out the old adage "A fool and his money are soon parted."
 

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A local, reputable dealer has at least least three new Series I
models at standard retail. If I was not flush with Series I models
they would not be there. I suppose that the desirablity, perceived
or otherwise, of the Series I models hasn't hit rural north Georgia.
 

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I think your general, run-of-the-mill, joe sixpack, got my tax return-gonna buy me a fancy new gun, guys will blindly purchase Kimber S2 weapons. They will take them home, they will pop a box and a half through it and declare themselves satisfied.

Those of us who have selected the 1911A1 through study, trial and error, sweat and tears, as our primary defensive weapon are lamenting the fact that S2 parts are the beginning of the end of one of the last mfg. of this thoroughbred bloodline.

I selected it because of its elegance of simplicity. All the parts you need....nothing you don't. I got it becuase not only could I find someone in almost any backwater town who could work on it if need be....I could find parts for it in almost any gun shop. Hell....I can work on most aspects of my S1 guns. zThis little bonus will begin to dissapate with the advent of proprietary parts

My dad was saddened when computer controlled, EFI, solid state, automobile engines became the norm. He couldn't afford the mainframe computer equipment required to work on his car.
Although this is not exaclty the case here....it's close enough.

The changes made do not enhance the breed. The changes are being made to make it more palatable to the gun-safety radicals. Little does Kimber and other mfg.s realize...the only modification that will ultimately satisfy these incrementalist S.O.B.s is that the ability to launch projectiles be eliminated. They would much rather see Kimber making golf clubs.
 

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Holding my Kimber Gold Combat Stainless (S1) makes me feel.....like God must feel when He holds His Kimber Gold Combat Stainless (S1)!!!!!
I like that. That's great.

45_Thud,
This change, sometimes they are for the better, sometimes not. The analogy with the cars is a good one, but remember the 70's? In that era, if your car lasted to 100,000 miles it was considered a great car or a fluke. Everyone wanted to be in the car when the odometer "rolled over".

Now-a-days, every car withing reason will hit 100 K. Most will go 150 K. You can go 100 K without a tune-up.

I will always prefer the internal extractor and the no-fp block, but manufacturers must be competetive in order to survive.

I do agree with you on one thing for sure. The liberals will never be satisfied until none of us are enjoying our current rights.

Dobe
 

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my dad's 1974 F-100 Ranger cost $5900.00 (which he thought was ridiculous) The dashboard was made from skull-crushing steel, the steering wheel had a rib-cage crushing steel frame, the razor-sharp air-conditioning condensor fins hung out of the bottom of the dashboard and cut me on more than one occaision. It got about 16 miles to the gallon.

My 1999 F-150 cost nearly $40k. All the interior parts are cushy plastic, There's more plumbing in my exhaust system that most aparment buidings. I can't tell the fuel filter from the air filter. the transfer case broke 4 days after the warranty ran out, a brake job costs $800. and it gets 14 miles to the gallon.

yeah...big improvement.

I also happen to know that that old pickup is still in use and is still happpily running.

Many times (especially around payment time) I wish I had that ol' truck.

Something tells me my son will reach for his finger-print activated, 152 bit-encrypted password activated, magazine disconnect, rubber-bullet dispensing, $8000.00 Glock 99 in the night...and wish he had his old dads Kimber Gold Combat
 

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Something tells me my son will reach for his finger-print activated, 152 bit-encrypted password activated, magazine disconnect, rubber-bullet dispensing, $8000.00 Glock 99 in the night...and wish he had his old dads Kimber Gold Combat
That is a prophecy I hope never comes true.
 

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45_THUD said:
my dad's 1974 F-100 Ranger cost $5900.00 (which he thought was ridiculous) The dashboard was made from skull-crushing steel, the steering wheel had a rib-cage crushing steel frame, the razor-sharp air-conditioning condensor fins hung out of the bottom of the dashboard and cut me on more than one occaision. It got about 16 miles to the gallon.

My 1999 F-150 cost nearly $40k. All the interior parts are cushy plastic, There's more plumbing in my exhaust system that most aparment buidings. I can't tell the fuel filter from the air filter. the transfer case broke 4 days after the warranty ran out, a brake job costs $800. and it gets 14 miles to the gallon.

yeah...big improvement.

I also happen to know that that old pickup is still in use and is still happpily running.

Many times (especially around payment time) I wish I had that ol' truck.

I don't know, I have got a 99 Z71 GMC with 182,000 miles on it with the original exhaust and brakes. The only thing I have done is put tires on it, (it's ready for it's third set) change a U joint at 120,000 miles and change the plugs and filters at 100,000.
Well that and a ton of oil changes. Physics being what it is, you aren't going to get real good gas mileage out of a big chunk of Detroit iron with a good sized V8, no matter what type of full size pickup you buy.

This "older is better" tain't necessarily so. Older is just older. Some were good and some were not. Be glad you don't have the older truck if you ever hit anything more solid than it.
 
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