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Can anyone recomend any good drills for improving accuracy, smooth draws, and/or quick sight aquisition? I dry fire alot but sometimes on the range I can find myself just placing rounds down range with no real goal in mind. So if you know of any good drills let me know! Thanks to all.
 

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I prefer a Black and Decker Versapack drill, myself.





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Blackjack
---------21----»

"The price of freedom is eternal vigilance"
-Thomas Jefferson

"I'd rather take matters into my own hands if someone were to break into my home, steal my possessions, violate and possibly murder my wife, and try to end my life as well. In short, don't enter my house unannounced. You might leave on a stretcher."
-Blackjack_21
 

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darn it, black jack beat me to it!!!

i was going to go with the makita cordless though.

milwakee makes a good drill too.

Best "drills" are just practice, drawing, target acquisition, etc. worry about a smooth fast draw then move on to more advanced things.... remember smooth = fast!

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Any gun will do if You will do.
 

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One of the best drills is single shots from the leather on a 25 yard target. When you can get center hits in two seconds every time, you will win most of your matches or other encounters.

One two-time IPSC national champion told me that was all he practiced in preparation for a match.

For the practice to be effective, you must accept only center hits, taking whatever time is necessary to achieve them.
 

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I like to do drills of: draw and fire, 2 body, one head.
I do several of these. Then do some draw and fire 2 body to several targets while moving forward, backward and laterally. Shoot till slidelock on these and do reloads. Single shots from leather will help with your draw and aim but will not give you any speed reload or shooting on the move work and will not help with your double taps. I have seen some very fast accurate shooters who fumble reloads and drop several places in matches because of it.

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"What most of these people need is a good slap upside the head. What I don't need is any more lawsuits." John "The Tooz" Matusak

[This message has been edited by BillD (edited 05-15-2001).]
 

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We call this one "Gunfight"
Set up an odd number of 6" steel plates at 10+ yards.
2 shooters, side by side facing plates.
1 shooter draws, the other reacts.
Each starts shooting on their end of the array of plates. (Left shooter starts on left side etc.)
Winner hits the middle plate.

The sound of the others gun going off makes for a REALLY stressful simulation, if you imagine that you have just been shot at. If they have hit the target, then you can imagine that you have just been shot. It is hard to go slow enough to hit when you perceive you are behind. But you cannot miss fast enough to catch up.
 

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Question: when you are just "winging" the shots downrange, are you actually hitting your ten ring? Please don't be mad - I was curious if you are paying attention to your front sight or do you ascribe to the "point shoot" method?

I'm not an expert, but I can tell you the drills my instructor (who's got a bunch o' credits, most of which I can't list here, but includes S.W.A.T. primary firerams instructor, among others) gave me, and then encouraged me to make some up as well.

The main drill I was taught was the Mozambique drill, known as the "failure" drill in certain circles, for obvious reasons. Two (double tap if you can do it) to the center of mass of the body, quickly assess as you swing your muzzle toward the head, and then one to the center of the head. If you want to make it more challenging, put up two silhouettes and practice shooting at both of them, as if dealing with two attackers at once. This keeps you from getting "target lock" on one target and usually scares the crap out of the usual plinkers at the range.

Also, try varying how you shoot your gun - one-handed is good. What if you need your other hand to call the cops, or you are holding a child or person behind you? Off-hand is one that I hate, because I'm a woman and my Kimber CCII .45 is full-sized and HEAVY when fully loaded. Plus, as you might well know, the .45 230 grain round kicks like a booger. But it's necessary - what if your shooting hand is somehow disabled or damaged or otherwise engaged? (Like wrapped around a bad guy's throat while his buddy is attacking you, or opening a door behind you.)

Shooting from concealment (i.e., over the top of the barrier) is useful - mimics shooting over your couch or other piece of furniture.

If you can get away with it, although most indoor ranges get nervous, try shooting around the corner of your stall. If you're friendly with the range owners, or if it's late and no one is there, you can do that one too.

Cover up one silhouette target halfway down the center with a reversed target - mimics someone taking cover around a corner. Shoot at the area of largest mass, and vary how the covering target covers your silhouette (most of head sticking out, most of shoulder, half of body, etc.)

I don't know about ranges in your area, but our range has an NRA night where they take down the barriers and allow you to draw from a holster. Call your local range and ask them. Of course, if you shoot at an outside range, this is not a problem (in most places). Usually, there's at least one NRA instructor there, and they'd be happy to overload you with drills (kinda like what I'm doing).

Accuracy is made up of three things: practice, practice, and more practice. Once you get accurate at a fairly close distance, such as 25 feet, start pushing it out. I usually go as far as the range will get me, with the goal to keep 80-90% of my shots in the ten ring. Most ranges go to 50 feet, some, like my range, go to 75 feet. Once you can keep 80% of your shots in the ten ring at 75 feet, then you're okay on plain old accuracy. At that point, move the target in to about 25 feet again, and start pushing your speed. If you normally have a 3 second pause between shots while you're finding your sights, consciously try to push it to 2 seconds. And so forth.

The only way I know of for quick sight acquisition is practice on both the range and dry-firing. Since Rule #2 tells you never cover anything you don't want to destroy with your muzzle, I particularly enjoy taking shots at the television while dry-firing. You can also pick off zeroes and numbers during commercials, and pick items on the screen to shoot. (Mentally: "Head shot on the statue over in the corner") This keeps the dry-firing from getting boring.

If you've got a handy spouse or sig other, have them call out what to shoot while both dry-firing and at the range, using a six box. A six box is a piece of paper, with lines drawn on it like a tic-tac-toe box, number one through six. (Back of a silhouette target is best, at about 45 feet or so. If you really want to get wild n' crazy, use a regular piece of notebook paper, but watch the target hanger. Ranges get nasty when you wing their hangers. I know. Personally.) Someone stands behind you, while you stay in the low ready position. They then call out a number, and you aim (or draw and aim) and shoot the number they call out. Works well, and forces you again to not get involved in target lock on one particular spot.

Okay, that was really long-winded, even for me. Hope I gave you some ideas.
 

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A recent article in American Handgunner by Ken Hackathorn at first appeared to me to be a very basic, easy little drill. It involved firing 3 strings of 6 shots at a bullseye target at 10 yards, from a ready position. First string is "slow fire"...Mr. Hackathorn suggests over 2 minutes. The second string is 6 shots in 10 seconds and the third 6 rounds is in five seconds. Ken says if you can't keep all 18 in the black you haven't got the basics wired. Well, a little humility is good for you, so they say. I'll keep going back to the range with that damned timer until I get this right. Stay safe.
 

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dry fire, 1000's of times.

also, practice shooting with your off hand, and practice loading mags with your other hand. practice racking the slide with the back of your shoe or boot.

if you wear glasses. (or contacts like me) practice shooting without them, find out where your probablitiy is without them, even if its only a little ways, know how you can shoot without your specs.

practice walking with the gun at eye level, get so you can move without the front sight bouncing everywhere.

there are hundreds of drills, but these came to mind as self defense importance

russel the cop


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CHANCE FAVORS THE PREPARED MIND....
 

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I have used 'Farnam' targets for years. two or three set up several feet apart, or even close together. Shoot from all positions, on the move, from cover, from 40 to 50 yards, from 3 yards, weak hand, etc, etc.

These are 8"X12" targets, steel, setting on a 4" square stand. The target is made so it falls if hit well, but a poor hit may cause the target to turn sideways. Target stands are on 1" steel rod, and are driven into the ground at different heights.

The targets can also be hung from a different stand, two to a stand, and used as a rolling thunder target/s. GLV
 

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Get into shooting IDPA. Lots of fun scenarios fro self defense with a handgun.
Offical IDPA targets are great to practice with a your local range as well. Check out the IDPA web site for more info on targets and maybe a local club that holds monthly shoots.
www.idpa.com


 

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The IDPA classifier is a good thing to practice. It covers quite a few things like shooting on the move, shooting from behind cover, multiple targets, ect. Square drills are another good thing. Put 4 cones or markers approx. 10 to 15 feet apart in a square. Start at position 1 (left rear cone) and shoot while advancing toward the target(s). When you reach position 2 (left front cone), shoot while moveing laterally left to right. When you reach position 3 (right front cone) shoot while retreating. When you reach position 4 (right rear cone), shoot while moving laterally right to left. You can use different variations of the drill by reversing the order, adding or subtracting targets, or adding or subtracting number of hits to each target.
 

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Airborne,

Slow, smooth, deliberate, *consistant* grip (how your hand - what precise position - grips the gun), draw, sight picture (sights against target), sight alignment, trigger pull, and follow through.

This can be dry and or live fire. The goal is consistancy; as many thousands of repetitions as you have time for or afford.

Trigger pull should get to the point where it occurrs at the moment the sights are aligned precisely on target.

Speed can be SLOWLY increased after the desired level of consistant accuracy is achieved. Once the consistant grip is achieved, you want your eyes to be on the target, nothing else (Of course in a tactical situation, multiple targets, scanning for other threats is another matter).

Real speed can then be acheived by progression. In a life or death situation; with the aforementioned taken care of, ACTUAL speed (barring emotional blocks like "panic" etc) should occurr through with the impulse of neccessity.

[This message has been edited by LAK (edited 07-03-2001).]
 

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If you want some fun, and have a suitable place, get one of those radio-controlled cars, tie a balloon to the top of the antenna.

I tried it over in Europe with a group at a military range that had a concrete area several feet wide running the length of the target area.

Great fun! And interesting practice. You can vary the action of the car, and the size of the balloons.
 
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