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Discussion Starter #1
Do any gov't agencies, or military units, use pistol lanyards? Is there a G.I. lanyard? I got a catalog form a company called Shomer-Tec(?), and they have a lanyard that is a wire on a spring-loaded reel, so the cable extends and retracts as necessary. A TV show that purported to show SEALS in training had the guys with what looked like phone cords on their pistols. Not very hi-tech; but what they really use? Is there anything in IPSC or IDPA rules about having the weapon attached to the shooter? I'm pretty sure there's nothing about lanyards, but I suspect they anticipated stabilizing rigs, and banned anything attaching the gun to the gun hand; what about the belt?
 

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The US military has lanyards and has used them since the 1911 was adopted. The early magazines even had lanyard loops, easier to keep track of empty magazines while on horse back that way.

The lanyard was a cord with a metal slide, for adjustment, and a spring clip. The cord ends met and were clipped into the looped end of the spring clip. Imagin a small spring steel figure 8 with a spring clip/snap hook parallel to the openings of the 8. More information that you asked for, right?

Anyway the militry lanyards have remained pretty close to the original style. Mounted police units use lanyards, I've seen MP units using lanyards, some high danger units use lanyards, the French police use lanyards - the reel on the belt type - and I'm sure other units use them also. I like a lanyard while I'm in an canoe. I've used a wrist lanyard a time or two where not being attached to a pistol was not healthy.

IDPA would frown on the use of a lanyard on a concealed pistol, I'm sure. Would not attaching the pistol to the belt with a lanyard help stabalize it while shooting. A third connection point while in a two handed stance.

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[This message has been edited by Jim V (edited 04-23-2001).]
 

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In addition to using lanyards for cavalry troops early air plane pilots used them to keep magazines from going thru wings.tom.

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the responses. I'm fairly familiar with the historical use of the lanyard - they actually seemed prevalent in WWI, if published photos are any indication. Was also a big fan of Sgt. Preston and Yukon King (On, King! On, you huskies! But I digress) I have one of the suprprisingly common military lanyards of the Great War, and wondered if there'd been much advancement. I bought a Gunsite mainspring housings with loop (the only "trick" part on my project gun), and thought it might be interesting to explore the lanyard. IDPA seems like the perfect place for a lanyard, if it's mounted on the belt and tensioned. I can't believe a few ounces of spring tension could be considered any kind of stabilization. Maybe I'll spring for one of the Shomer-Tec units; or go without a phone on match days?
 

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I have heard that some FBI personnel use a lanyard on 1911 style guns and have contracted with Smith&Aexander to make a main spring housing with a lanyard loop. It is my understanding that S&A does sell them to the public, but they are not listed in their catalog or on their website.
 

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The reason You find a lanyard loop offered on a Gunsite product is that Jeff Cooper prefered to have His Colt 1911 tied around His neck at night while in hostile lands.tom.

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Tac-Ord Recovery/Retension Lanyard, $19.95
The more common concept of the lanyard is for the recovery of a dropped firearm- especially high-speed operations like maritime ops in rhibs or zodiaks. However, Tac-Ord has developed a retention curriculum that brings attention to the potential for regaining control of your sidearm if it is lost to a BG. If you use a lanyard, it only makes it more necessary to have immediate access to a sharp blade- which is one of the most surefire ways of dumping out in a hurry.

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Blackhawk also makes a lanyard. Not sure of the quality, but everything else they manufacture is top notch!

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Jeff Cooper kept a 1911 on his neck at night?! I'm assuming this was while he was sleeping and not walking around right?

Also, this is not a flame but only info I heard that I wanted to pass to help others. I heard from other websites that Blackhawk gear is no longer made in the US and contracted out overseas (Not sure where) and the newer stuff had a tendency to fall apart (of course the warranty is still excellent). Just a heads up. I think SOE, Eagle, and LBTC are still the best.
 
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