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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Here is my one and only 1911.

The long term elderly owner was moving to Florida and his wife would not let him take it with him so he consigned it at the local gun store.
 

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His loss is your gain. Glad you got one. Looks like someone tried to reblue it but hopefully it's just the pics. And I an not an expert. You'll get some meaningful comments. Congrats.
 

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Wow... you have one of 5800 pistols delivered to the NAVY in 1913.

And that is original finish.....

And that is really cool.

m
 

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That's not a 1913 Navy. Look at the serial number again. That's a 1918 pistol.
Looks like it was well cared for. What about the barrel and mag?
 

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Looks to be an above average, honest example of a 'Black Army'. It appears that the finish has not been messed with, as previously mentioned.... just typical late war flaking.
 

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Looks to be an above average, honest example of a 'Black Army'. It appears that the finish has not been messed with, as previously mentioned.... just typical late war flaking.
Wow..then you got a real treasure on your hands. Mucho congrats. Do nothing to the finish except oil it. . Detail strip it and re-oil the insides. Hopefully you won't shoot it and just enjoy handling it. I would

Can you try to get the complete history from the old owner??
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the comments. Unfortunately it is not a Navy.

I did not get much information about the former owner other than he had an old revolver and this auto for a long time. His wife wanted him to get rid of both before his move to Florida so they compromised and he kept the revolver but sold the 1911.

The dealer who consigned it specializes in practical guns; class 3, Glocks, nothing made with wood, so this was not of interest to him.

The barrel has Colt 45 Auto on the lower left side and a G on the bottom with an excellent bore.

The magazine is two tone with no markings.

I believe the gun to have the original finish with the front of the slide discolored but not pitted from sitting in a holster.

The maker probably did not intend the finish to last 91 years.

I am not going to shoot it as the slide stop notch is not knurled showing that its wear is from handling and age and not use.
 

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Colt small G barrles were used as early as 1937 and as late as mid-1942. Colt large G barrels were used mid-1942 to early 1943.

Mr. Clawson includes approximate serial number ranges for these barrels in his 3rd Edition Collector's Guide. Wear patterns will still need to be examined to determine whether a barrel is likely to be original to a pistol.
 

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'I am not going to shoot it as the slide stop notch is not knurled showing that its wear is from handling and age and not use.'

I think you mean 'peened', not 'knurled'. 'Knurling' is the process of rolling the 'checkered' pattern into metal objects such as the control surface on the slide stop lever. Anyway, that is an astute observation about peening of the stop notch in the slide reflecting wear from shooting. Too bad about the barrel. Many were replaced because the ammunition was corrosive and the barrels were not always cleaned/oiled after firing, so they became corroded. Its somewhat rare to find a 'Black Army' with that much finish. The pistol is worth preserving as-is. Generally it is recommended that you not fire a M1911 because the slides have been known to crack, so you have made the right decision. Personally, I'd have to shoot it at least a couple of magazines, then put it away after cleaning/preserving.
 
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