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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've taken to wearing latex gloves when reloading, especially when I'm loading lead bullets (which make up about 90% of what I load and shoot).

I have a strange experience, though. After about ten minutes of wearing them, I start tasting the latex. I don't know why, and NO, I do NOT put the gloves in my mouth.

WHY do I taste latex?!?!?!?

Get this: My wife said my breath starts smelling like latex after a while.

Is this a mild allergic reaction? I've never had a rash, itching, etc. associated with an allergic reaction, but that's the only thing I can think of to explain it.
 

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I've taken to wearing latex gloves when reloading, especially when I'm loading lead bullets (which make up about 90% of what I load and shoot).

I have a strange experience, though. After about ten minutes of wearing them, I start tasting the latex. I don't know why, and NO, I do NOT put the gloves in my mouth.

WHY do I taste latex?!?!?!?

Get this: My wife said my breath starts smelling like latex after a while.

Is this a mild allergic reaction? I've never had a rash, itching, etc. associated with an allergic reaction, but that's the only thing I can think of to explain it.
It is most certainly a mild reaction to the gloves.

You can buy non-latex gloves that look and feel exactly the same. My son is a Police Officer and he has reactions similiar to what you described when he started out with regular department issued latex gloves. It got so bad at one point that he not only tasted the latex like you described, his throat started to close up on him and he ended up in the ER. When the problem was identified, he purchased a box of non latex gloves from the local police supply store and he has not had a similiar problem since.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It is most certainly a mild reaction to the gloves.

You can buy non-latex gloves that look and feel exactly the same. My son is a Police Officer and he has reactions similiar to what you described when he started out with regular department issued latex gloves. It got so bad at one point that he not only tasted the latex like you described, his throat started to close up on him and he ended up in the ER. When the problem was identified, he purchased a box of non latex gloves from the local police supply store and he has not had a similiar problem since.
You know, I'm a cop too but my department issues non-latex gloves. I've never had this experience until I started using latex at home.

On the other hand, I've never had that problem when using, uh, other forms of latex protection.
 

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If you have adequate ventilation, I would not worry about handling lead bullets if:

You do not smoke(not a good idea for a whole bunch of reasons), drink or eat while reloading

You do wash your hands with soap and water as soon as the session is over.

If you are more comfortable with wearing rubber or nitrile, good onya.

I have cast and loaded many truckloads of cast bullets. I observe the simple precautions above and have always had safe lead levels in my bloodwork results.
 

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Switching to nitrile gloves would probably be a good solution.
This is an excellent suggestion.

The Nitrile material will stand up better to physical use and is non-permeable.

If you read the fine print on most latex gloves you will find you are being provided minimal protection at best.

Good Luck
 

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I have to wear gloves because I'm in the medical field and I can tell you that there are various forms of latex allergies. I have stopped wearing latex gloves not because I have an allergy but some of my patients do.

The purple Nitrile gloves are the way to go. Not quite as comfortable as latex but hypoallergenic.

I don't wear gloves when reloading but I do wear them when cleaning my guns even though Hoppes and other solvents dissolves latex.
 

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On the other hand, I've never had that problem when using, uh, other forms of latex protection.


maybe it was due to the relatively short exposure time............:biglaugh:


......sorry, couldn't resist.
 

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If you have adequate ventilation, I would not worry about handling lead bullets if:

You do not smoke(not a good idea for a whole bunch of reasons), drink or eat while reloading

You do wash your hands with soap and water as soon as the session is over.

If you are more comfortable with wearing rubber or nitrile, good onya.

I have cast and loaded many truckloads of cast bullets. I observe the simple precautions above and have always had safe lead levels in my bloodwork results.
agreed, I've been exposed to lead vapors on a daily basis for most of my life and handleing lead and mercury with 0 protection. I have'nt no negative effects from such practices. Excessive consumption of "saturated fat and cholesterol" pose a much more serious health risk.
 

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I never wear gloves while reloading. I find it uncomfortable. Besides that I wash up very well afterwords. Now If I were molding bullets id wear them . I do wear them while using gun cleaning chemicals.
Also Plus one on the Purple Nitrile gloves. There free at the Doc's office to:biglaugh:
 

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Most car mechanics are using gloves now too.
Less wear and tear on the hands.
To make a connection with this thread, I'll say that I'll think about using gloves while reloading.:cool:
 

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I haven't read anything about the need to wear any sort of protective gloves during the reloading process. Not to trying to be funny but are you being overyly cautious? Don't get me wrong on this - I observe all of the reloading rules about eating, drinking, handling things that go near or in your mouth. To date, I have no ill effects from lead. To date, I have no ill effects from lead. To date ... :biglaugh: Sorry, couldn't resist the last two sentences. That shows I haven't changed!

I don't believe that you can be too careful but wearing gloves during the reloading process seems to be over the top. Fwiw, I wear glasses, gloves and a MSA mask that removes lead and other products when I reload.
 

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latex

One of the benefits of wearing latex gloves is that afterward your hands are sooooo soft. Kinda wears the edges of the nail polish though! :bawling:
 

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I've been wearing latex gloves when reloading not because of the lead concerns but rather to keep from getting fingerprints (from my body acids) on the brass. It isn't a tinfoil hat/conspiracy theory thing but rather just to keep the brass in better (looking) shape. I bought some ammo from someone awhile back that had fingerprints (not just smudges but readible prints) on the cases and it took me forever to get them cleaned up. I know it wouldn't have affected the ammo, but it just plain didn't look good.

I have tried the blue Nitrile (the purple weren't available) gloves and I couldn't finish the box off quick enough. They felt like I was wearing Ziplock bags instead of gloves. If I can find the purple Nitrile ones, I'll give them a shot because I too feel like I am getting sensitized to the latex.
 

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I wonder if latex or nitrile gloves make it easier to pick up those moly coated bullets? Them little buggers is slick. I'll have to try that.
 

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I don't know about the moly coated bullets but the FMJ's I use pick up a lot easier with the gloves. I wear latex gloves a lot not only to reload but to use spray paint, clean out the birdbath, and tons of other stuff. Just strip them off and you're done with cleanup except for a wash to get the powder off. I'll taking my wife to the heart institute in a week or so and Harbor Freight is on the list of places to stop for gloves. I'm going to get some nitrile to try out, too.
 
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