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After about a bazillion bullets, my ancient SAECO lead pot has finally died. After a small private service and some brief period of mourning, I have come to the conclusion I might need to get a new pot. A garage without the smell of flux in the winter is almost un-American.

I am looking at either the RCBS or the Lyman pot. Has anyone used either? I am looking for good and bad ink on either. I am not too worried about cost, as I don’t mind paying for quality. I cast nothing but linotype for my Freedom Arms 41 and 454.

There is something about 378 gns of gas checked lino cookin along at 1500 fps that says love.

Tom
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My ancient SAECO pots are still kicking, but if they were to pass on, I think I'd get the Lyman pot. A local gun shop owner has the Lyman he uses for his small casting business. It looks like a good set up. I especially like the mold guide on there. It looks like the same guide on one of my SAECO pots, and it works really well.

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johnnyb
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I am on my second Lyman pot ( both bottom pour ) in about 25 years. Can't complain. After considerable use the first one tried to electrocute me, sent it to Lyman, they sent me the new ( current ) style no charge. The aluminum mold guide is a mixed blessing; nice not to have to hold the mould up but it can be difficult to see and the grade of aluminum used is subject to galling so the mould may not slide across the guide as smooth as you would like. If it quits tomorrow I will buy another unless I can find an even bigger pot to work with. Having a thermometer helped my consistency a bunch.
 

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I vote for the RCBS Pro-Melt. Heats up quickly with a large capacity and keeps a very stable temperature. Plus the RCBS warranty is the best in the reloading tool business. They are not inexpensive, but worth the money.
 

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Chalk up another vote for the RCBS Pro Melt. 22 lb capacity, adjustable bottom pour, and holds alloy temperature within a few degrees of the initial setting. I didn't realize how enjoyable casting can be until I bought the RCBS and sold my Lee Production Pot. My father-in-law bought a used RCBS pot that didn't work and sent back to RCBS for refurbishment. The charge? $0 and free return shipping. Can't beat that.

[This message has been edited by CSH (edited 10-15-2001).]
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well I ended up getting a Lyman a few days ago. Yesterday I poured a couple hundred 378's and 305's for my Casull and about 150 250's for my 41. Its winter and linotype is in the air.

The support for the handles made it a lot easier. 4 cavity LBT moulds get heavy after a while.

Today will be filled with gas checks, lubing and sizing, heat-treating and maybe even some reloading.

The color orange looks strange on my bench. I was so used to Dillon blue and Redding green it’s almost unnerving. Thanks for the advice guys.

Tom
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Well, let me be the first to go cheap.

I got a Lee Production Pot 20 pounder for Christmas over a year ago. Has all the good features. Is extremely consistent, and doesn't leak at all. And, my wife got it for me for under $70!!!

(Of course, I'm still lusting for a Magma Master Caster...........


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[This message has been edited by Powderman (edited 11-11-2001).]
 

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I have owned and used, in this order... the Lee bottom pour, the RCBS, and now the Lyman...

My Lee pot (over 20-yrs. ago) had the drizzles -- it leaked, constantly. The RCBS was great, but had limited mould support, and a fella I worked with wanted to buy it from me, so I took his money and bought a Lyman -- I really like the Lyman mould guide / support, although I did modify it to work with the wider RCBS moulds (which are WAY-better than Lyman moulds).

In my experience, it's hard to beat RCBS and Dillon's warranty service -- I occasionaly find a Lyman product that out-performs RCBS by design, but you simply cannot beat the Dillon / RCBS lifetime warranty. --CC
 

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After using a Lee Production Pot IV (drip, drip, drip), I went with the Lyman and can't complain.

Odd thing is that I've been casting with a hot plate, a soup ladle, and a cast iron frying pan lately and enjoying it quite a bit. It won't replace the Lyman for high quantities of bullets, but I cast better 405 grain 45-70 bullets with it.

For someone just starting, I think the hot plate setup is a better way to go than the Lee bottom pour. Obviously there's other ways to go about it, but those two choices cost the same.
 

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Tom: Where are you getting LBT moulds these days?

I found wheelweight bullets dropped from the mould into water, gas checked and lubed with alox to be the equal of heat treated linotype. Cheaper and less trouble. Give it a try.

I drove those bullets beyond reason in a .445 Supermag. Increasing powder gave no signs of pressure, but I couldn't bring myself to go above mumble, mumble grains of 680. Never any leading.


[This message has been edited by KLN (edited 11-12-2001).]
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I have had my LBT moulds for a few years. Did LBT go under?

I also like wheel weights, I just have a few hundred pounds of linotype laying around.

Tom
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Last I heard, LBT was no longer in operation and there was a hint of legal difficulties. I don't recall the details.

Best pistol hunting bullets ever made, I think.
 
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