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I've heard alot in this forum about a variety of lead bullets (e.g., 230 grain lead "pinbuster") for pins, but I've not heard much about plated bullets. What's wrong with, say, the 230 grain FMJ flat point from Hornady? Can't you push up the velocities with that bullet with less smoke, too?

[This message has been edited by fremont (edited 03-11-2001).]
 

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I don't think velocities are the issue, because you're correct - lead and jacketed can reach enough velocity to kill a bowling pin. Smoke is a by-product of the powder you're using, not velocity - and the lube used on lead bullets.

I think you want to look at cost. lead will definitely be cheaper to shoot!

[This message has been edited by shane45-1911 (edited 03-23-2001).]
 

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I've done a lot of Pin Shooting and I use only JHP bullets. When one uses cast or plated solid bullets and you get hits on the side of the pin most of the time it will just knock the pin over. What I've found with JHP bullets if you hit the pin on its side most of the time the bullet will bite the pin, turn into the pin and spin it off the table. Also you want to keep in mind that if you are going to shoot on regulation tables its best if your loads are making a power factor of 200 or better. I'm shooting a 210 power factor out of my All-Sport Forty using a 135 gr JHP bullet. If you get a chance view the video on my web site. Hope to see you at some of the pin shoots.
Regards,Bob Hunter. www.huntercustoms.com
 

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I agree totally with what the other posts said. When I go to a match I load Jacketed bullets, cuz I remember one match where due to no air circulation after the second round you couldnt see the rest of the pins on the table. That Sucked!
I now load jacketed hollowpoints for the most part for matches, mainly due to the fact that they are the most accurate bullet style and they have the cutting effect like Bob was explaining. But dont ever forget that I am a cheap bastard and shoot as much lead as possible for practice since I cant afford to shoot jacketed all the time. If you use gas checks you can use lead with little problems, as we are doing with the 230gr .38spec bullets since after I checked into getting them jacketed, coppercoated, and every other coating shy of having them jacketed was not cost effective!(R&R now molycoats them BTW) So to make a long story short, lead for practice and some local matches, big matches with bucks on the line, Jacketed! hope this helps, DC

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I have used jacketed hollowpoints for the last few years on pins. Not because of the effectiveness, but I was lucky enough to latch on to a sponsor! Before that , I used the 255 swc in lead exclusively. It works really well if it feeds ok in your pistol. I think I used to load them with 4.2 gr of Bullseye. I won many prizes with that round and would go back to it if I ever lose my free ammo!
 

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Originally posted by fremont:
I've heard alot in this forum about a variety of lead bullets (e.g., 230 grain lead "pinbuster") <snip>
[This message has been edited by fremont (edited 03-11-2001).]
It's been a long time since I shot pins, except for just plinking in the back yard. There were not nearly as many jacketed bullets around back then (late 70's) and I adopted the Speer 225 JHP, which has some lead exposed but it fed OK (most of the time if the gun was clean) and it seemed to "bite" into the pin OK. I used 10.4 gr. of Blue-dot for a little over 1,000 fps.

I managed 2nd place at the Second Chance shoot in 1977 but Ad Clark, who was 1st, realy took the pins off with an 8 3/8" .44 and 17 gr. of Blue Dot with a Keith bullet. Ad was a top hand and could really make that .44 smoke!

It was an interesting match in that you shot 10 tables!! and you did not drop any bad ones like in later years. Ad beat me by a total of .63 seconds for all 10 tables (.06 seconds per table) but that included my disastourous run in which I split a pin and had to scoot it off the table, took 11 rounds in the end


In later years the winners seemed to start loading down - guess it worked, their times were faster but then the match was different. Though my shooting partner Bill Byrd won two years in a row with H&G 68s and 7.7 of Unique (talk about smoke!!!).

Were I to do it again I would likely use the Winchester or Rem. 230 JHP and enough fast powder (Clays or VV 320) to get 950 to 1000 fps. Something that might grab the pin if it did not hit a full caliber inside the outline and creates less smoke but has plenty of momentum. Still plain old ball would probably work just fine.

Pin shooting can be pretty instructional if the game is limited to duty guns. Less so with the stuff they use now but it is still fun!

Onward!
Jim Higginbotham
 

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Originally posted by Walking Point:
The lube used on cast bullets is a big factor with the smoke issue. Probably as much so as powder.
More. For .45 and .40 I practice with lead and use FMJ for matches. Same powder, but lead smokes like crazy, no smoke with FMJ. There are lead bullets coated with polymer lubes such as those sold by Precision Bullets that don't smoke but lead bullets are typically lubed with wax which causes most of the smoke.
 

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Originally posted by kbear38S:
More. For .45 and .40 I practice with lead and use FMJ for matches. Same powder, but lead smokes like crazy, no smoke with FMJ. There are lead bullets coated with polymer lubes such as those sold by Precision Bullets that don't smoke but lead bullets are typically lubed with wax which causes most of the smoke.

Ditto! I use very few lead bullets anymore. Great for hunting - especially those LBT monsters and the 255 Keith but then you usually only need one shot.

Carry on,
Jim Higginbotham
 
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