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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been using a Galco Royal Guard holster to carry my Dan Wesson Valor for a couple weeks now and I've noticed that every time I holster and draw the gun that there are streaks on it from the holster. I've been wearing it a lot to break it in and have been drawing and holstering quite a bit. Will this go away over time or is there something wrong with the treatment of the leather holster? Thanks
 

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I would think the leather marks could be rubbed off. I think it is better than the marks you get from a Kydex holster as those would be worrisome.

My holster maker advised before I ever put my gun into it to wrap the gun in wax paper, wax side out and leave in the holster for at least 24 hours. Then remove the gun and slide the gun in and out 15-20 times. If still tight, wrap in 2 pieces of wax paper and repeat the process. That is how I broke my new holster in and it fits goo.
 

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I would suspect that the streaks rub off too.

Leather holsters take several hundred presentations to break in. I'd spray a bit of silicone lubricant on your pistol and slide it in and out a few hundred times. Chances are, once your holster is broken in and fit to your exact pistol, you won't see many - if any - streaks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the replies guys. I'll try to take a couple pics and get them uploaded today. The streaks will rub off with a little CLP and a cloth. I'm hoping it'll eventually wear in and stop leaving the marks. It's not too big of deal but it is kinda annoying to take the gun out and have streaks on the slide.
 

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You do know that the "streak" is just the leather wearing off right? You've comfirmed it when you wiped it off with oil and cloth. It will eventually leave less and less "streaks" once the leather is worn off enough. Like you said, "it's not too big a deal" :).
 

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I would think the leather marks could be rubbed off. I think it is better than the marks you get from a Kydex holster as those would be worrisome.

My holster maker advised before I ever put my gun into it to wrap the gun in wax paper, wax side out and leave in the holster for at least 24 hours. Then remove the gun and slide the gun in and out 15-20 times. If still tight, wrap in 2 pieces of wax paper and repeat the process. That is how I broke my new holster in and it fits goo.
The wax paper method has always worked well for my new leather.
 

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My carry gun has worn right through the paint down to the aluminum on the frame in some spots, but it is a crossbreed.

Gives your gun character man, nevertheless, it will stop once the leather wears in
 

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I would think the leather marks could be rubbed off. I think it is better than the marks you get from a Kydex holster as those would be worrisome.

My holster maker advised before I ever put my gun into it to wrap the gun in wax paper, wax side out and leave in the holster for at least 24 hours. Then remove the gun and slide the gun in and out 15-20 times. If still tight, wrap in 2 pieces of wax paper and repeat the process. That is how I broke my new holster in and it fits goo.
I agree that pics would help!

My further comment will irritate two kinds of people: holster makers running a con, and buyers who have been conned. A properly designed and made holster needs no break-in. None. The fit is entirely the maker's job, not the buyers'.

Yes, it CAN be done when a maker knows how. When they don't know how, or even know it can be done, or don't accept that it's THEIR job, they'll take the easy road and lay it on the buyer to do it (make the holster fit and release "ideally").

I say this with many decades of experience consulting to all the big and middle sized holster makers. At the top of the ranks are Galco, who might be forgiven for not always being able to accomplish this because of sheer volume and relying on entry-level workers.

But your "custom" makers (they're not really custom products) shouldn't be given any leeway, making their products in small lots as they do.

No, it's not relevant that my current range has tension screws in them. Riveting them shut will give the same result; the screw is for extremes (tighter than "ideal" and looser than "ideal").

The entire subject reminds me of a large company that I work for; when it comes to safety, their corporate statement is that "it's everyone's job". Also a con; safety is the company's job, because worker's often don't have the knowledge, training or experience (or common sense) to know what's safe behaviour. But by saying "it's everyone's job", they attempt to diffuse responsibility to the group. A con.
 

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Who's con-ing who Rednichols? You must have never "consulted" Milt Sparks...here's what they have to say....


"Tightness in a new holster is not uncommon and is much preferable to the alternative. If the draw is a little stiff at first, it is recommended that you work with it to see if it doesn't loosen up with a bit of use. About 25 to 50 presentations should be a good indicator of whether the holster will break in sufficiently on its own or if maybe a little blocking out of the leather is in order. There are many variables as to why a holster would be excessively tight ranging from the texture of your guns finish, to slight changes in climate or humidity from where the holster is made. Regardless of the reason, a too tight holster can easily be remedied by the end user with a method we have been recommending to customers for over 30 years.

To block out (stretch) your new holster first UNLOAD your pistol or revolver and place the gun into the 4 mil plastic bag that your new holster was packaged in. Then carefully insert the bagged gun all the way into the holster (do not! I repeat, do not!! wet or spray the holster with any solution to aid in the stretching process). The blocking out process as described above will in no way harm the crisp detailed molding of your new holster, nor will it ruin its retention qualities. It serves simply to stretch the leather a few thousands of an inch larger than the gun. The amount of stretching time needed for satisfactory results range from a just a few minutes to overnight. Any clarifications or concerns on the above, or if you would rather we talk you through the process, then please call us."

They are the standard around these parts Red....and according to you.....they've been con-ing us all along....so when you gonna get over there to set them straight?
 

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A properly designed and made holster needs no break-in. None. The fit is entirely the maker's job, not the buyers'.
Poor Lou is rolling over in his grave. Allow me to speak on his behalf, with all the kindness and knowledge he was known for..........You sir, are incorrect.
 

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I agree that pics would help!

My further comment will irritate two kinds of people: holster makers running a con, and buyers who have been conned. A properly designed and made holster needs no break-in. None. The fit is entirely the maker's job, not the buyers'.

Yes, it CAN be done when a maker knows how. When they don't know how, or even know it can be done, or don't accept that it's THEIR job, they'll take the easy road and lay it on the buyer to do it (make the holster fit and release "ideally").

I say this with many decades of experience consulting to all the big and middle sized holster makers. At the top of the ranks are Galco, who might be forgiven for not always being able to accomplish this because of sheer volume and relying on entry-level workers.

But your "custom" makers (they're not really custom products) shouldn't be given any leeway, making their products in small lots as they do.

No, it's not relevant that my current range has tension screws in them. Riveting them shut will give the same result; the screw is for extremes (tighter than "ideal" and looser than "ideal").

The entire subject reminds me of a large company that I work for; when it comes to safety, their corporate statement is that "it's everyone's job". Also a con; safety is the company's job, because worker's often don't have the knowledge, training or experience (or common sense) to know what's safe behaviour. But by saying "it's everyone's job", they attempt to diffuse responsibility to the group. A con.
Hogwash.
Something as simple as the holster being made in a different climate than the end user's climate can account for changes in the fit. A holster maker in Phoenix has no way to account for a user in Miami.
 

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Throw your pistol down the drive way a few times. Gives it that perfect weathered WW2 look.

Wear is the ultimate refinish. Get another DW for your glass display case if you want. :rock:
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Tried to take a pic of the streaks but I just can't capture them well enough to show up. I'm just gonna carry the damn thing.
 

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I've never seen a holster that doesnt streak up a clean gun. If its a new holster, it will wear in. Just put your fingers in the holster to check for debris. Continue to wipe your gun down and it should even out.

If you are going to holster a gun expect wear. Its ok.
 

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Wow, lots of drama outside of the Kimber forum ;)...

I wholeheartedly agree that these machines that we love so much are just that, machines with which to accomplish a task, a tool, if you will. I really do not care about the finish on my pistols, outside of its intended mission of protecting the metal. I thought I was a lone soul with the belief that a well used pistol should look the part. Its good to see I am not alone. Like a vehicle, if your intent is to collect, then collect, if it is to race or play a game, some games are rough and can scratch your equipment. If it is to save your life, it should be well maintained mechanically, but the aesthetics end at the need to paint, lubricate, hammer or mark however required to ensure you are the victor.

Red, I hate to seem like I am piling on, but seriously, no two 1911's are exactly the same (Unless the same pistol from the same manufacturer). Its just like a shoe for your pistol. All shoes require a bit of break in. The wax paper method puts a bit of solid lubricant between the high points on the pistol and corresponding areas in your holster until the break in occurs. I like my Galco holsters, but to be honest, your post read more like a personal tirade than a technical opinion on holsters.
 

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but seriously, no two 1911's are exactly the same (Unless the same pistol from the same manufacturer)
Something pointed out to me by Mr. Alessi when I bought a holster from him in 2001 or 2002...he asked what make, I said a Springer, which back then had the blocky contours. Different holster altogether. And looking at different Springers from that era, there was still noticeable (not substantial but noticeable) difference in the profiles at the dust cover. I still have Mr. Alessi's belt slide for that same un-recontoured Springer, and it is now slick as snot while maintaining excellent retention, no doubt because I listened to his maintenance advice (Kiwi neutral shoe polish only, no lexol or ballistol or similar).

I spent much of the last five years abroad, and had not heard till very recently he passed on. I can belatedly express my sorrow to this community.

Best
 

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I agree that pics would help!

My further comment will irritate two kinds of people: holster makers running a con, and buyers who have been conned. A properly designed and made holster needs no break-in. None. The fit is entirely the maker's job, not the buyers'.

Yes, it CAN be done when a maker knows how. When they don't know how, or even know it can be done, or don't accept that it's THEIR job, they'll take the easy road and lay it on the buyer to do it (make the holster fit and release "ideally").

I say this with many decades of experience consulting to all the big and middle sized holster makers. At the top of the ranks are Galco, who might be forgiven for not always being able to accomplish this because of sheer volume and relying on entry-level workers.

But your "custom" makers (they're not really custom products) shouldn't be given any leeway, making their products in small lots as they do.

No, it's not relevant that my current range has tension screws in them. Riveting them shut will give the same result; the screw is for extremes (tighter than "ideal" and looser than "ideal").

The entire subject reminds me of a large company that I work for; when it comes to safety, their corporate statement is that "it's everyone's job". Also a con; safety is the company's job, because worker's often don't have the knowledge, training or experience (or common sense) to know what's safe behaviour. But by saying "it's everyone's job", they attempt to diffuse responsibility to the group. A con.
Red, I have had the pleasure of doing business with some really good holster makers for a number of years. The 3 that I primarily use are Milt Sparks, Matt Del Fatti, and John O'Rourke, all all of them have produced holsters for me that I have used for years and still use. All of those holsters still have excellent retention. One thing that I have noticed about these makers is that I have NEVER heard them say one negative thing about the work of other makers. They let the quality of the holsters speak for themselves and certainly don't say another maker is conning someone. Your posts on the other hand are always negative toward others while "tooting your own horn" about your accomplishments. I can't say anything bad or good about your holsters because I have never used them but I can say that with the attitude that you present on here, I will never purchase one of your holsters. As to your retention screw argument, if you are as good as you say you are, why not ask your customers if they want more or less retention and then make that "perfect" holster that you are so fond of saying that you can make. If you are that good, then there is absolutely no need for a retention screw as you could always make an absolutely perfect fit. Have a nice evening and hopefully you will someday learn to be a little less negative in your comments about other makers.
 
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