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I "thought" I either read or heard somewhere it was like 2-4 years. My husband says it's 10 years. I beg to differ with him, but not until I'm sure of the answer and that I'm correct......:biglaugh:
Thanks for the input.
~*Dona*~
 

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I believe that the half life of tritium is 10 to 12 years. I'm afraid your husband is correct.:(
 

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Yeah, in theory. Actually, Kimber shipped a ton of guns with very short-lived night sights. They're replacing them for free now.
 

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Actually, Kimber shipped a ton of guns with very short-lived night sights. They're replacing them for free now.
Really? The front sight on my CDP is dead, plus something is not right with the slide stop. When I emailed Dennis he said send in the slide and we'll replace the sight and send you a slide stop! Thought that was pretty nice! :)
 

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Even though you may have just purchased a gun, there is no way to tell how long the tritium vials that are in the sights have been sitting around before they were installed in the sights. This explains the different lifespans of sights.
 

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Even though you may have just purchased a gun, there is no way to tell how long the tritium vials that are in the sights have been sitting around before they were installed in the sights.
Strictly speaking you are right, however, at one time it was easy to identify what is at least a warranty countdown starting point on a Trijicon- the date was often screened on to the side of the rear sight (and sometimes the top of the front sight).

Nowadays, with Trijicons, the sight must be removed to identify the date of manufacture, but the information is usually there to be found.

In the case of Trijicon-equipped Novaks and Heinies, Trijicon has the date of manufacture screened on to the underside of the rear sight (used to be right there on the side of the sight itself).

When HESCO owned Meprolight they used a two-letter code stamped into the underside of the sight for the same purpose.

I do not know if this is still the case with Meps under Kimber ownership.
 

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From one of Jim Higginbotham's articles on "the site"...

"If you happen to have a pistol which has the minimal requirements of highly visible sights and manageable trigger then there are many options open to you. A good sturdy set of sights which are snag free will cost you somewhere between $50 and $100 installed. Tritium night sights ( which will last about 10 or 12 years) are a bit more and, while nice, are not essential."

Sorry...
 

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The Mepros on my Kimber were always a bit dim, sent the slide back after comparing them to my SA that I recently bought (have had the Kimber for 4 years or so) and the vials were replaced and I had the slide back within a week.

Generally the warranty for tritium is 10 years. If your sights are factory installed and going dim I'd talk to Kimber and see if they'll replace the vials.
 
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