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What can one expect as to life of Kimbers? Stainless? Aluminum? Polymer? Assume you shoot 200 rounds per week. Would it be too much to ask to get 50,000 to 100,000 before problems occur?
 

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Depends on how you maintain it.

I heard Shok Buffs help lengthen the career of a 1911. However, a well-maintained Kimber should last a life time.

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"Ain't nothin' like a finely-tuned 1911..."
 

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i heard that those shock buffs cause the slide not to complete it's mission, thus messing up the reliability of a gun as tight as a kimber. i'd steer away from those...search the forum and see what they say....oh yeah-- my pro carry's been through more than 5k rds and stil runs great w/o any real sign of wear.
 

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I've wondered about the longevity of the Kimber aluminum frame also. I've been assured, both on this forum and by Kimber, that the alloy frames are fine for a lifetime. Some good points were floated, namely that Bill Wilson uses the same exact frame (from the same exact manufacturer) in his Protector LWT.

Wilson backs all of his stuff with a full satisfaction guarantee. If he didn't trust the alloy frames, he'd surely not offer them only to replace them (for free) every few years.

Look at it this way.... Get an alloy Kimber for carry and a steel model for competition.
 

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Over 8,000 rounds through my Gold Match without any visible signs of wear.

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A man with a watch knows what time it is; a man with two watches isn't so sure
 

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Originally posted by BOLANTEJ:
i heard that those shock buffs cause the slide not to complete it's mission, thus messing up the reliability of a gun as tight as a kimber. i'd steer away from those...search the forum and see what they say....oh yeah-- my pro carry's been through more than 5k rds and stil runs great w/o any real sign of wear.
Kimber says A-OK to use shok-buffs with their CDPs.
Regards,
Sam
 
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Originally posted by BOLANTEJ:
i heard that those shock buffs cause the slide not to complete it's mission, thus messing up the reliability of a gun as tight as a kimber. i'd steer away from those...search the forum and see what they say....oh yeah-- my pro carry's been through more than 5k rds and stil runs great w/o any real sign of wear.

I use shock buffers in both my open class, (23,000 + rounds) and stock (3,000 rounds) competition Kimbers. I haven’t experience any malfunction do the using them. However I don’t use one nor recommend using one in a carry piece.
 

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It will really depend on what frame material you are talking about, how good you are with spring maintenance, and what kind of ammo you are shooting. If you are very good at maintemance and change springs when recommended by the spring makers, then it comes down to frame and ammo.

If you are using a steel (carbon, or stainless) frame and shooting US manufactured FMJ ammo. The frame should last a lifetime, with the carbon steel frame lasting a little longer. If you are using the the aluminum frame, are good at keeping it clean and lubricaed, and shoot the same US FMJ ammo, you will probably get, and possibly exceed the claimed 20,000 rounds.

If you are using foreign ammo, +P ammo, your results will vary. Foreign ammo can be quite good, but may be loaded hotter than the US FMJ ammo. The primers may be softer than the primers in US ammo which can damage firing pin holes in the slide if the primer deforms the right way. Plus foreign ammo is handled a lot more in the shipping process, this can have an adverse affect on the ammo's performance. Adverse can be hotter than normal, or less than normal, we have no way of predicting. +P will beat any pistol to death. I have seen at least one report here, or on pistolsmith.com, of a Kimber CDP frame cracking from shooting about 9,000 rounds of hotter than standard, but not quite +P ammo. +P probably would have done this sooner. Steel frames will hold up better, but they will still show the effects.

Aluminum frames present a special situation. Aluminum is used to make a pistol lightweight, as we all know, and manufacturers know that most people do not shoot any pistol a lot. So for most people 20,000 rounds is a couple of lifetimes worth of shooting. A comment that has been around for a long time is that an aluminum pistol is to be carried a lot and shot a little. The special situation for aluminum pistols is the need better attention to cleaning and lubrication than a steel frame does. The reason for this is most aluminum pistols are made from 7075 Aluminum, which is almost as stong as steel, but is very susceptible to corrosion damage, particularly from salt water. In order to prevent this the manufacturers go to great lengths to properly treat the aluminum and coat it with a good finish. Unfortunatly as we all know, over time the finish on the frame rails will wear off from use. So it is very important to keep the pistol clean and properly lubricated, to delay, or prevent the finish from wearing down to bare metal. Once the finish has worn down, using a good lubricant is improtant since it will act as a moisture barrier to keep moisture off of any bare spots.

So if you know you are going to shoot 200 rounds per week, get a steel frame. Since, at 200 rounds per week, you will reach 20,000 rounds in about 2 years.

I hope this helps.



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Str8_Shot

The best handgun for self defense, is the one you have with you.
 

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Close to 10K rounds through my Custom Classic. The slide-to-frame fit has loosened up slightly. It's still tighter than many new Springfields or Colts. Barrel fit is still tight. My hammer and sear didn't last long, but that may have had more to do with gunsmith tinkering than anything else.
 
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