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Discussion Starter #1
You all have seen my prized RIA 1911 with the custom made checkered grips with the USCG logo (since I'm a retired "Coastie"). Anyway, that was back in 2016 when I bought the grips and haven't touched them at all since them.
I know... shame... shame... :(

Anyway, here we are 4 years later and I decided to finally remove the USCG checkered grips (made out of Teak), and I look up various handgun grip websites and grip makers, and a majority use Boiled Linseed Oil to coat the wooden grips and help preserve them.

After 4 coats, (the first 2 coats soaked in like a sponge!) this is what my Teak checkered grips look like. I still have to wait about 24 hours or so before I put them back on.



Anyone else have advice on how to keep beautiful, "one of a kind" 1911 grips looking nice for years and years? What I meant by "one of a kind" is that the guy who made them in 2016 is no longer in business and told me personally that I was the only "Coastie" who ordered 1911 grips out of Teak for his CNC machine. I was also the only customer where he was able to test out, align, and tweak, the CNC template for the USCG logo! :cool:
 

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Go to bed bath and beyond and get some teak oil. If their teak oil will preserve a picnic table im sure your grips will love the stuff.

Sent from my SM-G970U using Tapatalk
 

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After hitting them acetone and Steel-wool...

BLO: I've had about 13 coats into my Hi-Power grips, and about 8 coats into my laminated 1911 grips. Afterwards, I've Johnson's Paste-waxed them twice - and now I just hit them with the wax about weekly, (at least weekly on the HP walnut).

My issue was "hair" rising on the left grip due to IWB carry, so I'm keeping up on the waxing, steel-wooling and so on as required.
 

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I have had Tung oil work well on wood, heard about it from a restaurant owner who used it on cutting boards that get hot water and soap on them repeatedly, daily. FWIW has microbiocidal properties too. Used it on stocks and grip without problems for about 4-5 years. Seems to dry completely (linseed doesn't?). I dilute it 1:1 with turps and then rub in using old t-shirt patches.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
From I understand "natural" Linseed oil takes forever to dry. But the common BLO (Boiled Linseed Oil) isn't actually boiled as the name suggests. From what I read it just means that is mixed some type of catalysts or whatever to increase drying time.
 

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As far as I am aware you are correct on the BLO. Tung oil gives a waterproof/water resistant finish, linseed oil does not. I have found 4-5 coats of tung oil seals well.
 

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I've used Tung before, and tried it again recently. Unfortunately, BLO is easier to work with and does a nice job, so I am chucking out the Tung Oil.
 

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I'll only use Tung oil. Thinned a bit so it soaks in deeper.
 

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Hi,
I make a BLO and premium beeswax mix for my wood projects

Make a 100% Neatsfoot Oil and beeswax mix for my leather goods.

Both work well and give a little waterproofing.
 

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The guy I got some high end cocobolo grips from said to use BLO.
Don't know if he uses that vs tung oil for quality of finish or ease of application.
 

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Good point. Once did a fire claim at a bed base manufacturer where cleaning rags started a fire near the wood drying are, did not go well.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Check it out... A total of 6 coats of BLO, let dry for 2 days, and now I just put them on my full size RIA 1911 .45 ACP :cool:

 

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I've used Tung before, and tried it again recently. Unfortunately, BLO is easier to work with and does a nice job, so I am chucking out the Tung Oil.
ALL LINSEED OIL CONTINUES TO DARKEN WITH TIME. To the point of making the figure in the wood grain eventually disappear into the over all darkness of the wood. I prefer to see more color & grain myself - even on checkered areas - which seem to soak up even more finish & darken most.

US military walnut wood rifle stocks were treated with boiled linseed oil.
Notice how dark - even lightly used ones have become. The manufacturers were concerned with cost & efficiency - NOT a beautiful, Hand Rubbed Tung Oil or Varnish finish. How you choose to finish is largely personal preference - unless trying for period military authenticity. Once Linseed oil has been applied - it prevents finishes applied over it from drying - for varying time periods - to never.
Best Wishes, C.
 

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TEAK stocks?
They look great. :rock:

I'll be trying pure Tung Oil and compare it to Tru-Oil that we used for about 2K sets of 1911s decades ago.

Glad to know I'm not alone.
An abundance of thick Teak, for an X frame project, left over from decades outfitting boats as a Marine Electronics tech and other chores.
I have some Afromosia/African Teak as well.

Not wanting to experiment with our costly laminated wood before a serious 460 Hunter tries a variation of his Nills to fit better.
Finger groove area is too tight and cramps the hand during extended range sessions. He has over 75K down range.
Spread out the Nill castings I made... trying to keep the width/thickness the same over the extended area.
After getting one side, starboard side, of the castings right I'll be making a set in Teak and bedding them. My old manual Marlin carver can reverse carve.
My grips, in Teak for masters, are under construction and are not ambidextrous.

Once he and others try them I'll make a set in my cross grained laminations and see how they hold up. Fracturing at the closed backstrap is common.
I'll spin out some with an open back as well.

I love making Christmas gifts. :D
 

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I'll only use Tung oil. Thinned a bit so it soaks in deeper.
I carved a rifle stock over 20 years ago for a rifle project. It was from a hunk of walnut I bought from a guy I knew growing up, and he'd cut it down in his yard, cut up the wood into stock blanks, and hung them up in his barn for decades.

When I finished the stock I followed some instructions I had from somewhere and put the first few coats on mixed 50/50 with turpentine. Stuff soaked in like water. Once I put enough coats on that it stopped soaking in as much, and of course it was dry, I finished it off with unthinned tung oil. The finish turned out really, really well. As far as I can tell it hasn't darkened or changed (other than dings from use) in all that time. Without being an expert in any of this, I'd reach for the tung oil again.
 
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